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The Realm: The True history behind Game of Thrones by [West, Ed]
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The Realm: The True history behind Game of Thrones Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Length: 86 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3342 KB
  • Print Length: 86 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JFCAV0S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #144,737 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book about a week ago and started reading it immediately. I'm at the end of Season 2 of the HBO series, Game of Thrones, and as a professional historian, I was intrigued about the history which people had said inspired George R.R. Martin's books. Having enjoyed Mr West's previous non-fiction works which mainly have to do with modern social issues, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that he had written The Realm, which discusses the historical parallels between what we see/read in Game of Thrones and events that actually happened in British history. West describes, in excellent detail, the ancient tribes (Celts, Picts, Anglo-Saxons, etc) that lived here in the British Isles and the impact Celtic and Nordic mythology had upon them and upon Martin's story. I was impressed by West's knowledge of a variety of religions and his way of conveying that information to readers. I would ignore the mean-spirited poor review, because most true history lovers would enjoy this. In short, this is a very enjoyable ride through Westeros and history and not to be missed!
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Format: Kindle Edition
I was quite intrigued by the cross references between a song of ice and fire and British medieval history. Being interested in history, although shamefully ignorant of all but the most notorious characters and spectacular events, I was happy to learn more. However, I also found it confusing at times and I was constantly going back to check which king I was reading about, and how he was related to the various protagonists. This is probably a fault of history itself being complex, rather than the author, but that is why I gave it four stars.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is very clever. The book takes a not very well known period of English history,.the early middle age start of the wars of the roses and uses this to mark out how the underpinning games of thrones royal houses challenge each other fir the iron throne. Excellent
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Greatly enjoyed this, found it informally informative, written with wit. It is very much a primer, but that was clearly the intent, right? An invitation to further reading on the subject, drawing parallels with Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire saga. Enjoy!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This little book was truly fun to read and provided an alternative view on English history which can be rather boring to read in the more usual fashion. It also identified the background to the Game of Thrones books which, incidentally, are much better than the TV series.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a massive thrones fan & history teacher I was so looking forward to reading this book. I was massively disappointed. I was expecting intelligent analysis and comprehensive comparisons and what I got was brief speculative drivel followed by poor and disjointed historical narrative. No introductory or concluding chapters, no clear thematic or chronological structure. My S4 pupils can write better history.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I was intrigued by this book, perhaps hopig to learn something new I didn't know about, yet this book proved to be a pointless read. While I liked the first chapter about the houses Lancaster and York, the second chapter presents the parallels between the migrations of real-world Britain to those of Westeros in a rather haphazard fashion. There are two major problems in the author's work - the lack of research of George R.R. Martin's statements and the ignorance of real history, both resulting in bad interpretation of A Song of Ice and Fire in terms of inspiration. Considering that is the whole point of the book, I would not be so enthusiastic about reading it.

The author's attempts to draw parallels between migrations and religious changes in Westeros with those of Britain. First Men had adopted the animistic religion (as George R.R. Martin characterises it) of the original population, but they also pushed the ancient inhabitants of Westeros into seclusion, so much so that the Children of the Forest are believed to be extinct. First Men are therefore both Celtic with regards to religion and Anglo-Saxon with the runic alphabet and wergild system. The parallel between Andals and Anglo-Saxons can't be taken seriously, because Andals are monotheists, not polytheists like Angles and Saxons, even though Ed West thinks Andals are polytheists.

In fact, Andals bring the Faith of the Seven to Westeros, which is a belief in seven gods who are one. A Song of Ice and Fire books are full of these references. George R.R. Martin himself says that the Faith of the Seven is based on Catholicism, but while Christians have a Trinity, three gods in one, the Faith of the Seven has...well...seven gods in one.
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