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Ravel - Bolero CD

4.1 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Audio CD, CD, 18 Sep 2006
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Product details

  • Orchestra: Anima Eterna Orchestra
  • Conductor: Jos van Immerseel
  • Composer: Maurice Ravel
  • Audio CD (18 Sept. 2006)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Zig Zag Territoires
  • ASIN: B000GLKRR4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 175,777 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
1
30
17:02
Album Only
2
30
6:09
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3
30
21:00
Album Only
4
30
4:12
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5
30
2:07
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6
30
2:40
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7
30
6:43
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8
30
12:10
Album Only

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
We've had Tchaikovsky, Strauss, Borodin and Rimsky-Korsakov - now the excellent period instrument orchestra Anima Eterna under the baton of Jos van Immerseel has finally reached the first part of the 20th Century with the French composer Maurice Ravel. This is new territory for the period instrument movement and it is hard to predict how this disc will be received.

Inevitably the programme starts with Bolero, taken here at an historically accurate slow pace - Ravel thought the piece should last 17 minutes, and Anima Eterna is very close to this target. There's not much to say about such a well-known piece, other than the excellent dynamics if this recording showcase one of the longest crescendos in music. This is followed by the tranquil (and quiet) Pavane pour une infante defunte, orchestrated by Ravel from the original piano score.

The one-movement Concerto for (piano) Left Hand, written for pianist Paul Wittgenstein in the early thirties who had an arm amputated in the First War, is played here (one-handed) on a 1905 Erard by Claire Chevalier. Not as strange as it sounds, the piece is superbly orchestrated and the whole range of the piano is used with great dexterity.

Rapsodie espagnole continues with the Spanish theme of Bolero and is four movement cycle of short pieces . The disc is rounded off with La Valse, a somewhat mutated Straussian waltz but pleasant listening none the less.

Apparently Immerseel used Ravel's own 78rpm recordings as a blueprint for tempi and style. The use of authentic technique, early 20th century wind instruments and gut strings is, as with other discs by Anima Eterna, rather academic as the quality of the orchestra speaks for itself. The sound is rich and full of colour but still retaining a certain transparency. As ever the recording itself can't be faulted. Highly recommended.
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Format: Audio CD
This is a magnificent disc of some of the most popular Ravel orchestral music, coupled with the lesser known (because difficult to perform) Concerto for Left Hand. Straight away it needs to be said that "authentic instrument" does NOT equal weak and thin sound; on the contrary, this is one of the richest recorded Ravel compilations I have ever heard, coupled with a sharp detail for all the shades of instrumental colouring that makes Ravel's music so endlessly fascinating. The Concerto with the 1906 Erard piano is quite astoundingly good, and the great surprise of the disc was a riveting performance of Bolero, which works wonderfully well at the slower speed of approximately 17 minutes (Dutoit's Decca disc with the Montreal Orchestra is an interesting comparison: recorded sumptuously in Decca's best sound the 15 minute performance still misses the mesmeric quality of this disc). The individual instruments, including a wonderfully seedy tenor sax, make this an ear-prickling experience. All the wind instruments, and the celesta and other percussion instruments, are from the period contemporaneous with Ravel's own life. Wonderful! If you have other recordings of this music then this disc will make you hear the music afresh. If you don't then I honestly suggest that you buy this disc and don't worry too much about even the "classic" performances by Monteux, Munch, Paray and so on. There is not a weak performance on the disc and two of them, the Concerto and La Valse, have claims to be the very best on record so far. A disc to buy whilst it is still available and treasure when bought!
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Format: Audio CD
We've had Tchaikovsky, Strauss, Borodin and Rimsky-Korsakov - now the excellent period instrument orchestra Anima Eterna under the baton of Jos van Immerseel has finally reached the first part of the 20th Century with the French composer Maurice Ravel. This is new territory for the period instrument movement and it is hard to predict how this disc will be received.

Inevitably the programme starts with Bolero, taken here at an historically accurate slow pace - Ravel thought the piece should last 17 minutes, and Anima Eterna is very close to this target. There's not much to say about such a well-known piece, other than the excellent dynamics if this recording showcase one of the longest crescendos in music. This is followed by the tranquil (and quiet) Pavane pour une infante defunte, orchestrated by Ravel from the original piano score.

The one-movement Concerto for (piano) Left Hand, written for pianist Paul Wittgenstein in the early thirties who had an arm amputated in the First War, is played here (one-handed) on a 1905 Erard by Claire Chevalier. Not as strange as it sounds, the piece is superbly orchestrated and the whole range of the piano is used with great dexterity.

Rapsodie espagnole continues with the Spanish theme of Bolero and is four movement cycle of short pieces . The disc is rounded off with La Valse, a somewhat mutated Straussian waltz but pleasant listening none the less.

Apparently Immerseel used Ravel's own 78rpm recordings as a blueprint for tempi and style. The use of authentic technique, early 20th century wind instruments and gut strings is, as with other discs by Anima Eterna, rather academic as the quality of the orchestra speaks for itself. The sound is rich and full of colour but still retaining a certain transparency. As ever the recording itself can't be faulted. Highly recommended.
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