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Rattle And Hum

4.5 out of 5 stars 79 customer reviews

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Product details

  • DVD Audio
  • Please Note: This is a DVD-Audio disc which is playable on most DVD players as well as all DVD-Audio players.
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • ASIN: B005C8S06Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 847,907 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Most of this 1988 release was recorded during the band's Joshua Tree tour. It is often derided for marking the moment U2 began to balloon out of control, veering into something near parody. To be fair, there are several highly inspired moments including "Desire," "Heartland," and "All I Want Is You." An uneven listen.

Rattle and Hum is an expression of U2's urge to have it both ways. A sprawling double album that incorporates live tracks, cover versions, collaborations, snippets of other people's music and a passage from a taped interview, the record is an obvious effort to clear the conceptual decks and lower expectations following the multiplatinum success of The Joshua Tree.

But ambition has always been U2's gift and curse, and the band clearly doesn't feel fully comfortable with its sights lowered. Consequently, if amid the rather studied chaos here, you feel moved to draw comparisons with masterpieces of excess like the Beatles' White Album or the Rolling Stones' Exile on Main Street, you can be sure that Bono, the Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr. won't mind a bit.

This record doesn't quite ascend to those heights, but U2 does win half the prize. In its inclusiveness and rollicking energy, Rattle and Hum caps the story of U2's rise from Dublin obscurity to international superstardom on a raucous, celebratory note. At the same time, it closes off none of the options the band might want to pursue for its next big move - and, possibly, the album even opens a few doors.

Despite Bono's insistence in the blistering "God Part II" that "I don't believe in the 60's in the golden age of pop/You glorify the past when the future dries up," Rattle and Hum is in large part a paean to the tradition of Sixties artists that U2 reveres.
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Format: Audio CD
Somewhere along the extended length of a career, whether you're a writer or filmmaker or musician, you hit a creative peak and along with impulse and self-belief comes the reasoning that you can do no wrong. On the whole critics are quite good at identifying that creative peak in artists too, and the reviews and analyses that follow usually move in one of two directions: either it's your masterwork and will never be bettered; or you've become bloated, self-indulgent and think that if you write, direct or sing the telephone directory, people will go out and buy it in droves. Well, if The Joshua Tree was U2's peak (and arguably their re-invention with 1991's Achtung Baby runs it close!) Rattle and Hum was by-and-large, as reviews have noted, their comedown. A mishmash of ideas said the critics, a potpourri of studio outtakes and ill-considered "classic" covers that U2 had no right touching. And then there was that "discovery-of-America" odyssey that the accompanying film turned out to be. Hindsight is always useful in these instances and now history is being somewhat kinder to Rattle and Hum - possibly because in comparison to Pop-era U2 in the late '90s, this record now looks like Sgt Pepper, Pet Sounds and Exile on Main Street all in one! There are vignettes here - Van Dieman's Land, Hawkmoon 269, the Dylan collaboration, Love Rescue Me - that don't really work, and one can still accept that All Along the Watchtower isn't quite Hendrix in his pomp. But the thrust of Desire, the grandeur of All I Want is You and the sheer joy of re-creating Memphis-sound rock and soul with Angel of Harlem (surely a bona-fide U2 classic?!) makes this a record worth re-visiting every now and then.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
This is a tribute album which U2 at the time of its release were heavily criticised for, but what critics fail to see is the outstanding use the band make of their roots in songs like "Heartland", "Love rescue me" and "Hawkmoon 269". What can be seen is an intensity carried on from the Joshua Tree, with an influence of blues, folk and country, which deliver beautiful melodies and powerful sounds. U2 were criticised for not delivering anything new, but how can songs like "All I want is You" and "Desire" not be considered original material. There is something about U2 in this album, Larry Mullen's intensity behind the drums, Adam Clayton's heartbeat sensation, Edge's atmospheric echoes and Bono's even stronger commitment to reaching his listeners, creates something enourmous, something which bursts out of your speakears, which renders this piece of music as original and as intense as U2 meant it to be.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I liked the album when it was release, but got bored after a while and sold it. U2 has been cooking the same old stew for too long and there is hardly an album after Achtung Baby that is still enjoyable. Rattle and Hum is one of them.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
good buy for the price, the last song on the cd skips a bit but for what I paid for it I don't mind, I polished the scratch out and it is fine, I would buy from them again as it did say on the copy I bought "minor scratches"
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By O E J TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Jun. 2008
Format: Audio CD
I can't understand why any U2 aficionado would criticise RATTLE AND HUM. I have THE JOSHUA TREE too, which seems to be everyone's favourite, but this one is surely on a par. Well, it's all a matter of opinion, and mine is that it is! Seventeen tracks, no less, and some classics among them. For me the best include Desire, I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For, Pride (In the Name of Love), Angel of Harlem, God Part II, and the best of a fantastic lot: All I Want Is You. Even if you removed all these outstanding songs the album would still be pretty decent. 25 years down the line and this one album contains some of the best rock music in an entire generation. Forget the 'Americanist' allegations, the moaning about the accompanying feature film - this is U2 at their best. A landmark musical creation by any standard, and an indicator of what made U2 one of the greatest rock bands on earth.
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