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Rasputin's Shadow Hardcover – 21 Nov 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 21 Nov 2013
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (21 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1409143805
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409143802
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.1 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 439,873 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

History, mystery, suspense, and action - Khoury knows the recipe for a good read (LIBRARY JOURNAL)

As hauntings go, this is one to freeze the blood. (NORTHERN ECHO)

Book Description

From the SUNDAY TIMES bestselling author of THE LAST TEMPLAR comes a gripping, high-concept thriller in the Sean Reilly series.

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Top Customer Reviews

By Parm TOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Nov. 2013
Format: Hardcover
For me Raymonds books are a different sort of thriller, the journey is just that a journey, its never for me a thrill ride. Instead its a tale on an epic scale everytime with a problem that has global ramifications. In this latest take we are back with our old friends Sean Reilly and Tess Chaykin (the 4th book in this series). There is a splendid time-slip element, taking us back to walk in the time of Rasputin, there is a fantastic continuation of the over all story arc for Sean Reilly and Tess Chaykin (this is also going to be frustrating as hell for anyone who has not read the last book).

The plot of this book is scary as hell, the concept of the technology (that i mention due to spoilers) is a terrorist nightmare, a horror that is so easy to envisage, the software and hardware exists, the science is sound, its just not been put together......or has it?

When you read how this technology could be used by a man or a government without a conscience, that's just scary, and its that which is the true skill and power of a Raymond Khoury book, the power to provide horrifyingly realistic visions of what could be.

well worth reading

(Parm)

Sean Reilly and Tess Chaykin
1. The Last Templar (2005)
2. The Templar Salvation (2010)
3. The Devil's Elixir (2011)
aka Second Time Around
4. Rasputin's Shadow (2013)

Novels
The Sanctuary (2007)
The Sign (2009)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not as impressed as I thought I woudl be having read other books by this author. This was a slightly messy novel, with too much going on and the modern part of the story about the child seemed almost irrelevant. Okay.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a terrible book. Up to now I've enjoyed the adventures of Sean & Tess and was looking forward to them continuing. The book starts very slow because a lot of characters are introduced, some with unpronouncable and immediately forgettable Russian names and keeping track of who's who slows down the action. The majority of the first 100 pages barely involve Sean Reilly and poor Tess is reduced to two mentions, both of them sleepy utterances from bed. Don't know what she's been doing since the end of the last book but she's still sleeping it off. By page 140 I was so fed up with Sokolov that I was beginning to question whether this was a Sean/Tess book at all but by then it was too late. The book went on to the Oxfam pile unfinished and I reached for the next Scott Mariani book. Raymond, get a grip.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good Khoury novel. Not his best, not his worst. I just happen to have one question, though : why did he name one of his characters Lev (aka Leo) Sokolov ? The exact same name has already been used by fellow novelist Steve Berry in his 2010's 'the Emperor's Tomb'. Can't be a coincidence and Lev Sokolov is certainly not the most common name in Russia. Tribute or private joke ?
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Format: Hardcover
I was really eager to get stuck into Raymond Khoury's fourth novel in his Templar/Reilly series, and with the chance to read about modern Russian history and how it's most notorious mysterious character, Rasputin, fits into the present day. Khoury really does have a nifty skill at writing quick-fire action scenes, getting the blood pumping and keeping your attention until the very last page. With the previous outing, we saw a much more personal approach to the story, with protagonist, Sean Reilly, taking centre stage - and I thought it would be extremely interesting to see how things would continue here.

What hits you straight away, is the mystery of why a Russian embassy official has seemingly committed suicide, and the elderly (ish) couple who lives in the flat, mysteriously disappeared? Things just don't add up for Reilly, as he is suspicious about the Russian connection in this case; feeling as if Russian FSB agent, Larisa Sokolova, is not revealing the full truth. It isn't until we learn of an unusual device that can cause people to become so enraged that they turn on everyone around them, that we see a connection back to the early 1900's and of course to the peasant who rose the social hierarchy, gaining the love and respect of the Russian Royal family - Grigory Rasputin.

The plot in Rasputin's Shadow is pretty decent and interesting - I mean, a machine that can be used unknowingly on innocent victims to turn them into savage barbarians is pretty mind-blowing. And addictive! What I really loved, especially early on, is how the reader can see both sides of the plot as it happens. Sokolov (the elderly retired Russian) weaves the tides expertly, trying to save his captured wife, as well as bringing his own plan of action into play.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can't quite put my finger on it but did not enjoy thus book as much as khourys others and I gave read them all. However, I would not say don't read it, I did enjoy it, but nit quite as much as usual.
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Format: Hardcover
This action-packed thriller featuring Khoury's FBI agent Sean Reilly is set in present-day New York with flashbacks to Rasputin's Russia. This time Reilly's on the track of a missing Russian scientist, who's created a mysterious device that could cause catastrophe if it fell into the wrong hands.

I hadn't read the previous Reilly books, so references to Reilly's son Alex and to his search for amoral CIA agent Reed Corrigan left me scratching my head at first. But once the primary plot concerning the mind control device kicked in, and the stakes and body count began to rise, I found Rasputin's Shadow a page-turner.

Khoury has clearly done extensive research - into the life and times of Rasputin and how microwaves can influence the brain, amongst other things - but he dispenses what he's learned sparingly so it doesn't get in the way of the action. The frequent switching between different characters' points of view may not be to every one's taste, but it illuminates the plot successfully and keeps the pace moving and the tension high. As for Khoury's cheeky rewriting of the exact nature of Rasputin's influence over the Tsar and Tsarina, to take into account the mind-control device, he pulls it off with a magician's flourish.
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