Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Raise High the Room Beam, Carpenters Mass Market Paperback – 1 Apr 1991

4.6 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback, 1 Apr 1991
£0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 1st LB Books Mass Market Pbk. Ed edition (April 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316769517
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316769518
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,141,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Salinger attended a military academy in Pennsylvania and three colleges.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 20 Mar. 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a short story about Salinger's brother Seymour (also written about in 'Lovely day for Bananafish' and 'Seymour: An Introduction')and it so moved me as to now be considered one of my all time favourite reads. Seymour's life story, although tragic, is what I feel to be the most beautiful and complete summary of what it means to be human that I've ever come across. Salinger writes this book with such love, the work comes across as poetic more than novelistic.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Both these stories are interlinked with that of "For Esmé with love and Squalor" and "Franny and Zooey" giving a greatly detailed view of the family's lives. When these stories are read with the other two books we can amazingly link the lives together especially thanks to this book. I would recommend reading this book after reading the other two first, thus you can interlink all the lives together and discover why future events may have happend. In conclusion this book is worth the money you pay for it, although I would not buy this before you get to know the authors past first. Christian Barron
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Recommend this reading for real literature lovers. You either love Salinger or don't get a clew what's it about. In this book there two stories about Glass family in usual Salinger style: talking about inner family relationship and their attitude to the outer world. The family is 'different' from 'normal', 'typical' people. If you like such a type, Salinger is your author. Not a lot of 'outer' action, everything is inside. Cannot say more, once you read something of Salinger, you get it. If you like it you want to read other his stories: Franny and Zoe, Nine stories, etc. Why I respect Salinger: he wrote his best and then stopped writing because he could not say more. If other authors would follow him, we would have less waste-paper.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
"Raise High..." is the book which I have recommended to book-loving acquaintances over the years more than any other. My urge is to share with them the exquisite writing of the scene in the wedding car. It is such a marvellous painting of the awkwardness of the experience for Buddy, I first read it in my late teens and laughed so hard and long that I have never forgotten the joy of the discovery in all the intervening years. As with much of Salinger's writing it is difficult to believe that he is not describing real events, my mind's eye has a startlingly vivid image of the bride's father's uncle which will remain with me for ever.

At just a little over 50 pages you'll read it in an hour or so and I hope remember it like I do.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have to disagree with some reviewers here. Seymour: an Introduction, is one of my favourite books despite the fact that I loathed it the first time I read it as it doesn't follow any conventions of traditional narrative or 'book writing'. Essentially in Seymour an Introduction, Salinger gives up the restrictions that a plot forces upon a writer in having to move logically from point to point in order to develop 'a story' and instead he offers a series of highlights or lovingly crafted 'best bits' by way of an INTRODUCTION to a character. This results in a zig-zag unconnected approach that is the antithesis of narrative (this is similar in structure to Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations). Like anyone asked to describe a loved relative, fictional or not - we would not pedantically recount their life's story, but like Salinger we would repeat a number of incidents and anecdotes that most seemed to sum up that person in order to give the listener an idea of what they were actually like. If you absolutely demand a bog standard book which follows easy narrative rules to carry you through then don't buy this. If on the other hand, you'd like to get to know Seymour and the rest of the Glass family better - then buy this now.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If these two, very different but related, pieces were published separately (as originally they were, in the magazine The New Yorker), I would give Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters four stars and Seymour: An Introduction three.

Both are fiction and both are about members of the Glass Family, primarily narrator Buddy and his dead and much revered elder brother Seymour. In both cases, the setting is mainly the upper reaches of Manhattan Island, New York City, where the Glass family were brought up. Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters tells us of what would have been Seymour's wedding day, had Seymour presented himself at the ceremony, which he did not. Buddy put himself to some trouble to be there, and afterwards endured an uncomfortable taxi ride with other guests whose sympathies were entirely with the apparently forsaken bride. He regained his dignity when his fellow passengers accepted his invitation to a conveniently located and blessedly air-conditioned apartment belonging to Seymour and himself. His faith in his elder brother and pride in all members of his family needed no restorative, however; of those he never suffered a moment's doubt.

The parallels between Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters and The Catcher in the Rye are clear and Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters makes as good follow-on reading to Catcher in the Rye as Salinger offers in any of his writing.

Seymour: An Introduction is less accessible and, although much previously unknown detail about Seymour and other members of the Glass Family is revealed, the story represents the point at which lovers of Catcher in the Rye looking for more of the same are likely to become permanently stuck.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback