Rainy Milo

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Biography

Every so often an artist comes along that stops you in your tracks, who shows you exciting new possibilities, who restores your faith in the transforming power of music. Rainy Milo is such an artist. Eighteen-years old, from South London, she oozes confidence and attitude. Her voice is soulful and mature way beyond her years, while her music blends jazz, hip hop, R’n’B and pop into something effortlessly cool, forward-thinking and hugely accessible. It’s telling that the list of artists to which Rainy has been compared — it includes Lily Allen, Neneh Cherry, Corinne Bailey Rae and Amy ... Read more

Every so often an artist comes along that stops you in your tracks, who shows you exciting new possibilities, who restores your faith in the transforming power of music. Rainy Milo is such an artist. Eighteen-years old, from South London, she oozes confidence and attitude. Her voice is soulful and mature way beyond her years, while her music blends jazz, hip hop, R’n’B and pop into something effortlessly cool, forward-thinking and hugely accessible. It’s telling that the list of artists to which Rainy has been compared — it includes Lily Allen, Neneh Cherry, Corinne Bailey Rae and Amy Winehouse — have very little in common with each other. She doesn’t really sound like any of them. In fact, she doesn’t really sound like anyone else. It’s no exaggeration to say that Rainy Milo is unique.

It was never going to be any other way. “When I first started making music, I was thinking about what sort of career I would like,” explains Rainy. “I don’t like things that sound like they were made for the radio. I respect people like M.I.A. and Sade. They are real. They’ve made the music they want to make. It doesn’t feel manufactured or forced. Even though M.I.A. is big she feels underground. I like that.”

Milo’s early musical landscape was conflicted. Her mum liked Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, her dad was more into Elvis Costello, while Tupac was the soundtrack in her older sister’s bedroom. The first band Rainy loved were N*E*R*D. She started making music when she was 14. “I had a keyboard which I used to button bash,” she says. “I was into poetry at school. I realised that the poetry mixed with the stuff I was making on the keyboard could become a song.”

She did a spell at the BRIT school. Initially she found being surrounded by other creative types inspiring, but became disillusioned later on. “There were a lot of affected people,” she says. “There was a lot of chatter. That kind of thing kills your energy. I didn’t see the point of staying in school to study how to do stuff I already had the chance to do for real.”

At the end of 2011, Milo was surfing Youtube when she came across a track by a producer called BLCK RSSN. She liked the old jazz sample from Grover Washington mixed with a dusty hip hop beat. She messaged BLCK RSSN and asked him if he minded her using it as the basis of a song. He didn’t. The result was ‘’Bout You’. “I put it on the internet expecting just my friends at school to hear it,” she says. “But loads of people, A&Rs, started e-mailing me. I had to Google what an A&R was.”

Gilles Peterson added to the buzz when he included ‘’Bout You’ on his ‘Bubblers Eight’ compilation. However, Rainy’s big break came when she sent the track to an online friend she’d met while blogging about old school trainers and vintage Gucci jumpers. He worked in a vintage shop in Los Angeles. He passed the tape to the owner, whose partner worked in the music industry. Milo flew out to meet her and came back with a manager.

The Californian connection explains why, in the summer of 2012, Rainy moved to San Francisco to record ‘Limey’, a mixtape and statement of intent. “I wanted to make a CD so that when I met people I could give it to them and say, This is me. If you want to be part of it, great, if you don’t at least you know. I didn’t want to be moulded into someone I didn’t want to be. I’d rather come through the door as who I am.” ‘Limey’ fused jazz vibes, hip hop rhythms and Rainy’s seductive, smokey vocals. As well as ‘’Bout You’ and the Chet Faker-produced ‘Don’t Regret Me’, it included a brilliant reimagining of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel’s 1975 Number 1 ‘Make Me Smile (Come Up And See Me)’, which took the original’s bittersweet contrast of kiss-off lyrics and breezy melodies and turn them into something much darker.

At the end of 2012, Rainy returned to San Francisco to make her debut album. “I remember thinking on the plane, How the hell am I going to make a whole album,” she laughs. “I had three months set aside to write it, but with my music, if I’m not feeling it, I don’t force it.” In the end it wasn’t a problem. She had a phone full of ideas from her own diaries, many jotted down while travelling from the London suburbs to the city centre. “I do nearly all of my writing on the bus,” she explains. “It’s good for overhearing stuff. Girls talking about their boyfriends. You hear one side and you can imagine the other. The Number 3 bus is great because it’s a really long journey, through Crystal Palace and Brixton all the way to Oxford Circus. It takes about an hour.”
The album was overseen by Daje, who Rainy worked with on ‘Limey’; he also produced ‘Treasure Girl’ and ‘Bankrobber’ (another wildly imaginative cover, this time of The Clash). Los Angeles production duo Caswell produced seven tracks, including ‘Rats’. Inspiration came from Daje and his studio full of vintage gear. “We used a lot of vintage mics and compressors and we recorded to tape,” says Rainy. “It changes the ambience of the music. It makes all the difference. Now I couldn’t imagine not having that stuff. My favourite piece of gear is a Telefunken U47 mic from the ’60s.”

‘This Thing Of Ours’ takes the blueprint Rainy laid down on ‘Limey’ and expands upon it. It’s a stunning record. Is there any other 18-year-old making R’n’B as forward-thinking ‘Rats’ or ‘Treasure Girl’? Rainy thinks her secret is the fact that she’s unflinchingly honest. “And my music comes from a young voice,” she continues. “It’s a fresh voice. I think you can tell that a lot of the things I’m singing about, it’s the first time that it’s happened to me. Not naive, but innocent. When you listen to an artist write a song about something they’ve written about before, you can almost hear the knowingness. It’s like they know what the audience wants and they give it to them. I don’t know what the audience wants yet. In fact I don’t think about the audience. I do it for me.”

She pauses before adding. “My ambition for this record is that I’d like it to define a sound that’s my own. I’d like it so that when someone new comes along people say, This person is the next Rainy Milo.”
Rainy is a homegrown British gem-in-the-making. It won’t be long before that dream is reality.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Every so often an artist comes along that stops you in your tracks, who shows you exciting new possibilities, who restores your faith in the transforming power of music. Rainy Milo is such an artist. Eighteen-years old, from South London, she oozes confidence and attitude. Her voice is soulful and mature way beyond her years, while her music blends jazz, hip hop, R’n’B and pop into something effortlessly cool, forward-thinking and hugely accessible. It’s telling that the list of artists to which Rainy has been compared — it includes Lily Allen, Neneh Cherry, Corinne Bailey Rae and Amy Winehouse — have very little in common with each other. She doesn’t really sound like any of them. In fact, she doesn’t really sound like anyone else. It’s no exaggeration to say that Rainy Milo is unique.

It was never going to be any other way. “When I first started making music, I was thinking about what sort of career I would like,” explains Rainy. “I don’t like things that sound like they were made for the radio. I respect people like M.I.A. and Sade. They are real. They’ve made the music they want to make. It doesn’t feel manufactured or forced. Even though M.I.A. is big she feels underground. I like that.”

Milo’s early musical landscape was conflicted. Her mum liked Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, her dad was more into Elvis Costello, while Tupac was the soundtrack in her older sister’s bedroom. The first band Rainy loved were N*E*R*D. She started making music when she was 14. “I had a keyboard which I used to button bash,” she says. “I was into poetry at school. I realised that the poetry mixed with the stuff I was making on the keyboard could become a song.”

She did a spell at the BRIT school. Initially she found being surrounded by other creative types inspiring, but became disillusioned later on. “There were a lot of affected people,” she says. “There was a lot of chatter. That kind of thing kills your energy. I didn’t see the point of staying in school to study how to do stuff I already had the chance to do for real.”

At the end of 2011, Milo was surfing Youtube when she came across a track by a producer called BLCK RSSN. She liked the old jazz sample from Grover Washington mixed with a dusty hip hop beat. She messaged BLCK RSSN and asked him if he minded her using it as the basis of a song. He didn’t. The result was ‘’Bout You’. “I put it on the internet expecting just my friends at school to hear it,” she says. “But loads of people, A&Rs, started e-mailing me. I had to Google what an A&R was.”

Gilles Peterson added to the buzz when he included ‘’Bout You’ on his ‘Bubblers Eight’ compilation. However, Rainy’s big break came when she sent the track to an online friend she’d met while blogging about old school trainers and vintage Gucci jumpers. He worked in a vintage shop in Los Angeles. He passed the tape to the owner, whose partner worked in the music industry. Milo flew out to meet her and came back with a manager.

The Californian connection explains why, in the summer of 2012, Rainy moved to San Francisco to record ‘Limey’, a mixtape and statement of intent. “I wanted to make a CD so that when I met people I could give it to them and say, This is me. If you want to be part of it, great, if you don’t at least you know. I didn’t want to be moulded into someone I didn’t want to be. I’d rather come through the door as who I am.” ‘Limey’ fused jazz vibes, hip hop rhythms and Rainy’s seductive, smokey vocals. As well as ‘’Bout You’ and the Chet Faker-produced ‘Don’t Regret Me’, it included a brilliant reimagining of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel’s 1975 Number 1 ‘Make Me Smile (Come Up And See Me)’, which took the original’s bittersweet contrast of kiss-off lyrics and breezy melodies and turn them into something much darker.

At the end of 2012, Rainy returned to San Francisco to make her debut album. “I remember thinking on the plane, How the hell am I going to make a whole album,” she laughs. “I had three months set aside to write it, but with my music, if I’m not feeling it, I don’t force it.” In the end it wasn’t a problem. She had a phone full of ideas from her own diaries, many jotted down while travelling from the London suburbs to the city centre. “I do nearly all of my writing on the bus,” she explains. “It’s good for overhearing stuff. Girls talking about their boyfriends. You hear one side and you can imagine the other. The Number 3 bus is great because it’s a really long journey, through Crystal Palace and Brixton all the way to Oxford Circus. It takes about an hour.”
The album was overseen by Daje, who Rainy worked with on ‘Limey’; he also produced ‘Treasure Girl’ and ‘Bankrobber’ (another wildly imaginative cover, this time of The Clash). Los Angeles production duo Caswell produced seven tracks, including ‘Rats’. Inspiration came from Daje and his studio full of vintage gear. “We used a lot of vintage mics and compressors and we recorded to tape,” says Rainy. “It changes the ambience of the music. It makes all the difference. Now I couldn’t imagine not having that stuff. My favourite piece of gear is a Telefunken U47 mic from the ’60s.”

‘This Thing Of Ours’ takes the blueprint Rainy laid down on ‘Limey’ and expands upon it. It’s a stunning record. Is there any other 18-year-old making R’n’B as forward-thinking ‘Rats’ or ‘Treasure Girl’? Rainy thinks her secret is the fact that she’s unflinchingly honest. “And my music comes from a young voice,” she continues. “It’s a fresh voice. I think you can tell that a lot of the things I’m singing about, it’s the first time that it’s happened to me. Not naive, but innocent. When you listen to an artist write a song about something they’ve written about before, you can almost hear the knowingness. It’s like they know what the audience wants and they give it to them. I don’t know what the audience wants yet. In fact I don’t think about the audience. I do it for me.”

She pauses before adding. “My ambition for this record is that I’d like it to define a sound that’s my own. I’d like it so that when someone new comes along people say, This person is the next Rainy Milo.”
Rainy is a homegrown British gem-in-the-making. It won’t be long before that dream is reality.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Every so often an artist comes along that stops you in your tracks, who shows you exciting new possibilities, who restores your faith in the transforming power of music. Rainy Milo is such an artist. Eighteen-years old, from South London, she oozes confidence and attitude. Her voice is soulful and mature way beyond her years, while her music blends jazz, hip hop, R’n’B and pop into something effortlessly cool, forward-thinking and hugely accessible. It’s telling that the list of artists to which Rainy has been compared — it includes Lily Allen, Neneh Cherry, Corinne Bailey Rae and Amy Winehouse — have very little in common with each other. She doesn’t really sound like any of them. In fact, she doesn’t really sound like anyone else. It’s no exaggeration to say that Rainy Milo is unique.

It was never going to be any other way. “When I first started making music, I was thinking about what sort of career I would like,” explains Rainy. “I don’t like things that sound like they were made for the radio. I respect people like M.I.A. and Sade. They are real. They’ve made the music they want to make. It doesn’t feel manufactured or forced. Even though M.I.A. is big she feels underground. I like that.”

Milo’s early musical landscape was conflicted. Her mum liked Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, her dad was more into Elvis Costello, while Tupac was the soundtrack in her older sister’s bedroom. The first band Rainy loved were N*E*R*D. She started making music when she was 14. “I had a keyboard which I used to button bash,” she says. “I was into poetry at school. I realised that the poetry mixed with the stuff I was making on the keyboard could become a song.”

She did a spell at the BRIT school. Initially she found being surrounded by other creative types inspiring, but became disillusioned later on. “There were a lot of affected people,” she says. “There was a lot of chatter. That kind of thing kills your energy. I didn’t see the point of staying in school to study how to do stuff I already had the chance to do for real.”

At the end of 2011, Milo was surfing Youtube when she came across a track by a producer called BLCK RSSN. She liked the old jazz sample from Grover Washington mixed with a dusty hip hop beat. She messaged BLCK RSSN and asked him if he minded her using it as the basis of a song. He didn’t. The result was ‘’Bout You’. “I put it on the internet expecting just my friends at school to hear it,” she says. “But loads of people, A&Rs, started e-mailing me. I had to Google what an A&R was.”

Gilles Peterson added to the buzz when he included ‘’Bout You’ on his ‘Bubblers Eight’ compilation. However, Rainy’s big break came when she sent the track to an online friend she’d met while blogging about old school trainers and vintage Gucci jumpers. He worked in a vintage shop in Los Angeles. He passed the tape to the owner, whose partner worked in the music industry. Milo flew out to meet her and came back with a manager.

The Californian connection explains why, in the summer of 2012, Rainy moved to San Francisco to record ‘Limey’, a mixtape and statement of intent. “I wanted to make a CD so that when I met people I could give it to them and say, This is me. If you want to be part of it, great, if you don’t at least you know. I didn’t want to be moulded into someone I didn’t want to be. I’d rather come through the door as who I am.” ‘Limey’ fused jazz vibes, hip hop rhythms and Rainy’s seductive, smokey vocals. As well as ‘’Bout You’ and the Chet Faker-produced ‘Don’t Regret Me’, it included a brilliant reimagining of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel’s 1975 Number 1 ‘Make Me Smile (Come Up And See Me)’, which took the original’s bittersweet contrast of kiss-off lyrics and breezy melodies and turn them into something much darker.

At the end of 2012, Rainy returned to San Francisco to make her debut album. “I remember thinking on the plane, How the hell am I going to make a whole album,” she laughs. “I had three months set aside to write it, but with my music, if I’m not feeling it, I don’t force it.” In the end it wasn’t a problem. She had a phone full of ideas from her own diaries, many jotted down while travelling from the London suburbs to the city centre. “I do nearly all of my writing on the bus,” she explains. “It’s good for overhearing stuff. Girls talking about their boyfriends. You hear one side and you can imagine the other. The Number 3 bus is great because it’s a really long journey, through Crystal Palace and Brixton all the way to Oxford Circus. It takes about an hour.”
The album was overseen by Daje, who Rainy worked with on ‘Limey’; he also produced ‘Treasure Girl’ and ‘Bankrobber’ (another wildly imaginative cover, this time of The Clash). Los Angeles production duo Caswell produced seven tracks, including ‘Rats’. Inspiration came from Daje and his studio full of vintage gear. “We used a lot of vintage mics and compressors and we recorded to tape,” says Rainy. “It changes the ambience of the music. It makes all the difference. Now I couldn’t imagine not having that stuff. My favourite piece of gear is a Telefunken U47 mic from the ’60s.”

‘This Thing Of Ours’ takes the blueprint Rainy laid down on ‘Limey’ and expands upon it. It’s a stunning record. Is there any other 18-year-old making R’n’B as forward-thinking ‘Rats’ or ‘Treasure Girl’? Rainy thinks her secret is the fact that she’s unflinchingly honest. “And my music comes from a young voice,” she continues. “It’s a fresh voice. I think you can tell that a lot of the things I’m singing about, it’s the first time that it’s happened to me. Not naive, but innocent. When you listen to an artist write a song about something they’ve written about before, you can almost hear the knowingness. It’s like they know what the audience wants and they give it to them. I don’t know what the audience wants yet. In fact I don’t think about the audience. I do it for me.”

She pauses before adding. “My ambition for this record is that I’d like it to define a sound that’s my own. I’d like it so that when someone new comes along people say, This person is the next Rainy Milo.”
Rainy is a homegrown British gem-in-the-making. It won’t be long before that dream is reality.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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