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Rain Tree Crow

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by trec002.
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£9.99 Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by trec002.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (8 April 1991)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Virgin
  • ASIN: B000000WI9
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 404,509 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Big Wheels In Shanty Town
  2. Every Colour You Are
  3. Rain Tree Crow
  4. Red Earth (As Summertime Ends)
  5. Pocket Full Of Change
  6. Boat's For Burning
  7. New Moon At Red Deer Wallow
  8. Blackwater
  9. A Reassuringly Dull Sunday
  10. Blackcrow Hits Shoe Shine City
  11. Scratchings On The Bible Belt
  12. Cries And Whispers

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you are looking for a carbon copy of a Japan album then you will be very disappointed, this is more in the vein of Sylvians solo work, the whole album is a journey, alive with emotion, pocketful of change is the best song, buy it, settle back with your favourite tipple, and stare out the window.
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Format: Audio CD
'Rain Tree Crow' is an album from the early 90's that I seem to play more with the advance of time. It sits well next to other greats of that era: 'Heaven or Las Vegas', 'Laughing Stock', 'Loveless', 'Hats'. I think it is as overlooked as Scott Walker's masterful 'Tilt'- a lot of this is due to the absurdity of renaming Japan Rain Tree Crow. But you have to move forward- or you're Duran Duran or Ultravox. Which is no good.
The members of Japan had played together between 'Oil on Canvas' & this: Jansen had played on all of his brothers solo albums, Barbieri had popped up on 'Brilliant Trees' & 'Gone to Earth'- while Karn's solo album featured both Jansen & Sylvian on the gorgeous peak 'Buoy' (very much a sketch of this album). The album was recorded in 1989/90 with Pat McCarthy (REM) & Steve Nye (Japan) with the feeling of 'live improvisation'- so this has more in common with 'Silent Way'-Miles or 'Eden'-Talk Talk than the pre-set world of 'Cantonese Boy'.
'Big Wheels in Shanty Town' is very world music- building to backing vocals & horns; it is as good as anything on Peter Gabriel's 'Passion'...'Every Colour You Are' is a sublime song- as great as 'Brilliant Trees', 'Orpheus' or 'Nightporter'; Phil Palmer's slide guitar makes this particularly moving. Plus we get lyrics that are very influenced by Seamus Heaney- a constant for the album...'Rain Tree Crow'is a minimal piece that contrasts with the vast instrumental 'Red Earth' (you picture Mount Fuji in your mind). Brian Gascoigne's orchestration is as fine as on Scott Walker's 'Farmer in the City'...'Pocket Full of Change' is another brilliant song- the space & tone of the organ&keyboards- plus Michael Brook's brilliant guitar effects...
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Format: Audio CD
This 1991 reincarnation of Japan (minus some-time member Rob Dean) is a delightful hybrid of the experimental styles of its reunited members, post several excellent solo albums. It starts off with a crisp and funky sound in Big Wheels in Shanty Town, but it is not long before we slip into the moody bliss at the heart of Messrs Sylvian, Karn, Jansen and Barbieri.
Certainly this album provides an opportunity for non-Japan/Sylvian fans to indulge themselves in some scintillating sounds and crisp production, without the impenetrable wall of affectation that has symbolised much of the later solo work from all involved.
There are some moments of weakness where the plot seems to have been left at home, but these are easily forgiven with the sumptuous Blackwater, Every Colour You Are and Pocket Full of Change. Overall, Rain Tree Crow offered a wonderful distraction from the lukewarm choices of the early ‘90s and remains significant today in a way that only well crafted music can.
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Format: Audio CD
Rain Tree Crow (or the reformed Japan under an assumed name... guess who thought 'that' name up ?) was essentially a largely improvised jamming album with David Sylvian's fluidic vocals layered over the top, occasionally giving rise to the odd tune. If you're intent on hearing the early-80's Japan all over again, you're in for a pretty big surprise.
Released in 1991, nine years after Japan's split, much of the offerings here are overly-pretencious, with the psychological battle of the differing musical styles of Messrs Sylvian, Karn, Jansen and Barbieri being almost audible, the very reason they split in the first place. RTC was to fold immediately after the recordings for the very same reasons, together with the fact that Sylvian wished to hold separate press conferences to the rest of the band, which must have been pretty annoying. Suffice to say, all involved vowed never to reform again after this episode, which is a pity.
However, RTC has left us with a couple of classic tracks in the gorgeous 'Blackwater' and the weird and wonderful 'Scratchings On The Bible Belt', which are perhaps worth the price of admission alone. If the rest of the album had subscribed to this kind of quality, then perhaps this could have been the lost cult album of the 1990's. Alas, it never was, and passed us by relatively unnoticed.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
better than I thought ,you can tell its japan
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