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Raiders of the Nile: A Novel of the Ancient World (Novels of Ancient Rome) by [Saylor, Steven]
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Raiders of the Nile: A Novel of the Ancient World (Novels of Ancient Rome) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews

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Kindle Edition, 25 Feb 2014
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Length: 351 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"If you're going to tour the ancient world, you could find no better guide than Saylor, who has proven his mastery of the form" --"USA Today" on "The Seven Wonders"
"A vivid and robust writer, Saylor invests his books with exquisite detail and powerful drama." --"The Philadelphia Inquirer" on "A Mist of Prophecies"

"As always, Saylor excels at bringing the past alive, in particular by incorporating the political issues of the day into the action." --"Publishers Weekly" (starred) on "The Seven Wonders
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"Vivid....Saylor has found a marvelous way to bring Roman history and mores alive. This is an excellent entryway to ancient Rome." -"Booklist" (starred review) on "The Seven Wonders"
"Saylor's ability to re-create the classical world is always astounding, and "The Seven Wonders" is no exception. Expertly researched and beautifully written... A thoroughly enjoyable read." -"The Deseret News"
"Steven Saylor's engrossing series centers around Gordianus the Finder--a kind of Roman Sherlock Holmes." -"The Wall Street Journal" on "The Triumph of Caesar"

If you're going to tour the ancient world, you could find no better guide than Saylor, who has proven his mastery of the form "USA Today on The Seven Wonders"

A vivid and robust writer, Saylor invests his books with exquisite detail and powerful drama. "The Philadelphia Inquirer on A Mist of Prophecies"

As always, Saylor excels at bringing the past alive, in particular by incorporating the political issues of the day into the action. "Publishers Weekly (starred) on The Seven Wonders"

Vivid .Saylor has found a marvelous way to bring Roman history and mores alive. This is an excellent entryway to ancient Rome. "Booklist (starred review) on The Seven Wonders"

Saylor's ability to re-create the classical world is always astounding, and "The Seven Wonders" is no exception. Expertly researched and beautifully written A thoroughly enjoyable read. "The Deseret News"

Steven Saylor s engrossing series centers around Gordianus the Finder a kind of Roman Sherlock Holmes. "The Wall Street Journal on The Triumph of Caesar""

Book Description

From the bestselling author of Empire and Roma comes the new adventure featuring Gordianus the Finder

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1590 KB
  • Print Length: 351 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books (25 Feb. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00F8HJ5F6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #345,716 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It seems to be the done thing at the moment for the author of a series of books to either take their main character back to their youth, or in the case of Lindsey Davis, get Flavia Alba, the daughter of Marcus Didius Falco to follow in the footsteps of her father. I struggled initially with Flavia Alba, The Ides of April (Falco: The New Generation) but I had no such problem with a younger Gordianus the Finder. First introduced to the reader as an 18-year-old in the book The Seven Wonders.

I found it rather strange initially to come to terms with the fact that Bethesda, is the slave of Gordianus, rather than his bossy, but loving wife from the earlier books. It is also the rashness and youthful strength of Gordianus that shines through, rather than the resourcefulness and mental agility of the more mature character of the earlier books. The return to the younger Gordianus is an astute move by the author as it gives his character a subtle freshness.

Gordianus has left his teens and is now a young man of twenty two, living in Alexandria. The storyline revolves around the wrongful kidnapping of Bethesda and the attempts by Gordianus to find and rescue her before the kidnappers realise they have got the wrong woman and decide that the easiest way out of their predicament is to silence the sassy Egyptian slave girl for good.

As with all of Steven Saylor's books in the Roma Sub Rosa series there are twists and turns aplenty to give the reader food for thought. The author is a past master at setting the scene and I found the switch from Rome to Alexandria an interesting interlude. Finally if returning Gordianus to his younger days extends the life of the series, I am all for it. Steven Saylor still manages to write books good enough to see off most of the competition.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the second prequel to the author's 'Gordianus' series. Set in Egypt, it follows Gordianus' early life, and this episode has him trying to rescue Bethesda, his slave, after she is kidnapped by a gang of bandits.
As with the first prequel, I didn't find it as gripping as the original series. I can't fully explain why; perhaps because the outcome was known, perhaps because the setting seems less well defined as the Rome of the main series. Still interesting and worth reading, but if you are new to Saylor's work, I would recommend reading the later series first.
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By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 16 May 2014
Format: Paperback
Steven Saylor has written the series known as the Roma Sub Rosa series, featuring the sleuth Gordianus the finder, and his family in late Republic Rome. The first twelve books in the series, published between 1991 and 2008 went in chronological order from 80 BC to 46 BC. Then Saylor wrote The Seven Wonders (2012) which goes back to Gordianus’s youth, and is set in 92-90 BC. This book, Raiders of the Nile follows on from The Seven Wonders so again features Gordianus as a young man, and is set in 88 BC. (Two other books, Roma: The Novel of Ancient Rome (2007) and Empire: The Novel of Imperial Rome (2010) are generational epics from Early to Imperial Rome through to 141 AD and the rule of Hadrian. Those books do not feature Gordianus.) These are absolutely wonderful books, and I have read them all (though prior to my Amazon reviewing, so I have not yet reviewed them).

At the end of The Seven Wonders Gordianus had brought a slave, Bethesda (little knowing how closely linked her future and his were to be, as we know from the later chronological Gordianus books). Now, in 88 BC Gordianus is living in Alexandria and has just celebrated his 22nd birthday. As he tells us in the first sentence of the book, “I had a long list of things I wanted to do, but taking part in a raid to steal the golden sarcophagus of Alexander the Great had never been among them.”

Where the chronologically later Gordianus books take us into the depths of the narrow streets and lanes of Republican Rome and its environs, these latest two books have taken us into Egypt – through the dusty streets of Alexandria and down the Nile, and in this latest book across the Delta with only a streetwise young slave called Djet and a vaguely amenable camel for friendly company.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Nicely written and researched Roman/Egyptian romp from the early days of our hero but the plot seems a bit too modern for the setting, no reason to suppose this sort of thing did not happen it just feels wrong. If you have read the other books in this series you will not be disappointed with this road trip and it's escapades.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Loved this book. of Gordianus' early days. Read it at top speed and now will read it again more slowly. Would like more of Gordianus' youth and also later ones of his daughter and son in law taking over the business.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is impossible not to enjoy Saylor's tales. However, by his own high standards, I found this rather disappointing. I am among those who think Gordianus loses some of his allure when taken out of his strictly Roman setting. The prequel books are about the young Gordianus abroad - in a Greek/Egyptian setting. This is frequently emphasised by the characters he meets referring to him - disparagingly - as "Roman" The best part about the book is the Author's Notes - & you have to wait to the end for these. These explain the ancient sources which inspired the story: but the sources are so ancient as to have been well trodden before. The resulting novel had the feel of a potboiler. Young Gordianus is not nearly as interesting as his more mature self was in the earlier novels. I hope Saylor can be persuaded to skip back to the more rounded Gordianus & the streets of Rome.
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