Listen Now
Go Unlimited
Start your 30-day free trial
Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can play 40 million songs, thousands of playlists and ad-free stations including new releases. Learn More
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).

  
£7.99 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 3 left in stock - order soon. Sold by marvelio-uk

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£8.27
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: roundMediaUK
Add to Basket
£8.43
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: uniqueplace-uk
Add to Basket
£9.58
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: nagiry
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.99

Rachmaninov: The Bells; Spring Cantata; 3 Russian Songs

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

Price: £7.99
Only 3 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by marvelio-uk.
14 new from £5.65 5 used from £5.64
£7.99 Only 3 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by marvelio-uk.


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Product details

  • Audio CD (14 Aug. 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Classics
  • ASIN: B000B5VMAQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 267,278 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
1
30
6:17
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
2
30
10:20
Album Only
3
30
8:07
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
4
30
10:34
Album Only
5
30
15:59
Album Only
6
30
3:17
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
7
30
5:08
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
8
30
3:39
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Jun. 2007
Format: Audio CD
If it makes sense to talk about doing gloom brilliantly then Russian composers do gloom brilliantly. This disc offers us a good hour's worth of fine frowning stuff from Rachmaninov, splendidly performed and in general, I'd say, well recorded. The sound at the start is in the middle distance rather than in the foreground, but turning the volume up a little helps, and even here the effect is perfectly satisfactory if one thinks in terms of how it might sound in the concert hall from a seat towards the back. As the disc progressed I fancied that matters improved in this respect, whether or not my impression was largely a matter of becoming accustomed to the acoustics. Where this recorded sound really scores with me is in conveying atmosphere. The impact is beautifully lugubrious, enhancing my sense of a fine, accomplished and thoroughly idiomatic set of renderings.

The words are not provided let alone translated, but the brief and anonymous liner note is actually rather a good one, telling us probably all that most of us want to know about the precise meaning of what is being sung in The Bells and Spring. These compositions seem to me not so much `settings' of texts as a kind of vocal tone-poem, with the music's programme incorporated verbally into the score rather than provided as background information in the manner of Strauss. The Bells is to an adaptation of Poe, depicting the four ages of man in a generalised and sombre idiom that slightly recalled to me the essay by the Russian tragedy-queen in one of the Hyman Kaplan books `Life, Death, what is they?
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Ralph Moore TOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Mar. 2011
Format: Audio CD
While the classic recording of this wonderfully kaleidoscopic piece might be the old Kondrashin on Melodiya, if you want modern digital sound you are likely to go for either of these two - although the couplings might heavily influence your decision.

In brief, Pletnev has the more sumptuous sound and takes a more intense, measured approach to Rachmaninov's similarly rich, layered score, while Dutoit has slightly leaner sound and is sharper and more propulsive in his interpretation - yet their timings are identical for the second Lento movement. My feeling is that Dutoit has the better overview, presenting the four movements as a true symphony whereas Pletnev brings greater impact to key moments such as the great choral outburst at "Skov" in that second "golden bells" section.

Regarding the choirs, the Philadelphians almost convince us of their ability to suggest Russian authenticity; they are a bigger outfit than the Moscow State Chamber Choir who, while obviously Russian in their attack and depth of tone, are very slightly underpowered by comparison but compensate for lack of sheer weight with more pointed underlining of the words. There is less clarity and definition in the singing of Dutoit's choir - which might also be an effect of a more blurred sound in the engineering and in the third, purely choral movement, of Dutoit's option for the denser vocal arrangement.

Dutoit has more conventional, neater-voiced soloists: Kaludov is decidedly more ingratiating of tone than the grainy, rough-voiced Larin but the latter is more characterful. Both sopranos are the real deal, making a voluminous Russian sound, but Mescheriakova, although just a little clumsy, is more exciting than the more delicate, nuanced Pendachanska.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The soloists are great but the choir is hesitant on entries and their Russian pronunciation is poor. Overall the recording is useful if you need to learn the work in a hurry.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dutoit or Pletnev? 19 Mar. 2011
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
While the classic recording of this wonderfully kaleidoscopic piece might be the old Kondrashin on Melodiya, if you want modern digital sound you are likely to go for either of these two - although the couplings might heavily influence your decision.

In brief, Pletnev has the more sumptuous sound and takes a more intense, measured approach to Rachmaninov's similarly rich, layered score, while Dutoit has slightly leaner sound and is sharper and more propulsive in his interpretation - yet their timings are identical for the second Lento movement. My feeling is that Dutoit has the better overview, presenting the four movements as a true symphony whereas Pletnev brings greater impact to key moments such as the great choral outburst at "Skov" in that second "golden bells" section.

Regarding the choirs, the Philadelphians almost convince us of their ability to suggest Russian authenticity; they are a bigger outfit than the Moscow State Chamber Choir who, while obviously Russian in their attack and depth of tone, are very slightly underpowered by comparison but compensate for lack of sheer weight with more pointed underlining of the words. There is less clarity and definition in the singing of Dutoit's choir - which might also be an effect of a more blurred sound in the engineering and in the third, purely choral movement, of Dutoit's option for the denser vocal arrangement.

Dutoit has more conventional, neater-voiced soloists: Kaludov is decidedly more ingratiating of tone than the grainy, rough-voiced Larin but the latter is more characterful. Both sopranos are the real deal, making a voluminous Russian sound, but Mescheriakova, although just a little clumsy, is more exciting than the more delicate, nuanced Pendachanska. Both are very good indeed, just as are both celebrated the Russian baritones; Leiferkus has the more dangerous edge in his tone and Chernov the more beautiful voice.

Pletnev's unusual choice of coupling in Taneyev's John of Damascus might be a deciding factor for some. It is a very grand, noble choral composition, fusing Russian folk and liturgical music with strict counterpoint in the style of Bach; the concluding fugue is exciting in its own right and much more than a mere academic exercise. The chance to own and hear this might prove more attractive than Dutoit's more predictable coupling with what is arguably some of Rachmaninov's less striking choral writing. This, in combination with richer sound and Pletnev's greater depth of feeling, inclines me to the DG disc.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DARKNESS AUDIBLE 8 Jun. 2007
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If it makes sense to talk about doing gloom brilliantly then Russian composers do gloom brilliantly. This disc offers us a good hour's worth of fine frowning stuff from Rachmaninov, splendidly performed and in general, I'd say, well recorded. The sound at the start is in the middle distance rather than in the foreground, but turning the volume up a little helps, and even here the effect is perfectly satisfactory if one thinks in terms of how it might sound in the concert hall from a seat towards the back. As the disc progressed I fancied that matters improved in this respect, whether or not my impression was largely a matter of becoming accustomed to the acoustics. Where this recorded sound really scores with me is in conveying atmosphere. The impact is beautifully lugubrious, enhancing my sense of a fine, accomplished and thoroughly idiomatic set of renderings.

The words are not provided let alone translated, but the brief and anonymous liner note is actually rather a good one, telling us probably all that most of us want to know about the precise meaning of what is being sung in The Bells and Spring. These compositions seem to me not so much `settings' of texts as a kind of vocal tone-poem, with the music's programme incorporated verbally into the score rather than provided as background information in the manner of Strauss. The Bells is to an adaptation of Poe, depicting the four ages of man in a generalised and sombre idiom that slightly recalled to me the essay by the Russian tragedy-queen in one of the Hyman Kaplan books `Life, Death, what is they?' Spring is another vocal tone-poem, this time with no soloists, recounting the tale of a Russian peasant brooding through the depths of the Russian winter on his wife's infidelity, from which dark thoughts he is aroused by the coming of spring, but only relieved to a certain extent from the sound of it. It's rather a pity that the liner-note writer doesn't sketch in the meaning of at least the first two of the Three Russian Songs, but the general harmonics of these seem to be along the same lines as those of the foregoing pieces. The last of the three songs is a folk-song adaptation, and I have to admit that within the parameters of each national culture's folk-song idiom one tends to sound to me very much like the next.

The performances strike me as outstandingly good. The orchestra is of course the great Philadelphia, and the conductor is the admirable Dutoit. The chorus are just right for me, and I could almost see them all in fur hats. Absolutely superlative are the three vocal soloists, their tone grand and ringing and their technical accomplishment total.

`Come, divinest melancholy' says Milton in Il Penseroso. To use a commoner expression, it all works for me.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Look for similar items by category