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Comment: Publisher: Westview Press
Date of Publication: 2005
Binding: paperback
Edition:
Condition: Good
Description: ISBN:9780813343228 Used Paperback. Covers are lightly marked. Leading corners, edges and spine ends are slightly worn. Film is beginning to peel on lower leading corners. Page block foot is marked. Binding is intact, contents are clean and clear. AM
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Race: The Reality of Human Differences Paperback – 29 Jul 2005

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Perseus; New Ed edition (29 July 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813343224
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813343228
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 785,931 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Vincent Sarichis Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.Frank Miele is senior editor with Skeptic magazine. Frank Miele'shighly regarded Skeptic interviews include conversations with evolutionists Richard Dawkins and E. O. Wilson, anthropologists Donald Johanson, Lionel Tiger, and Robin Fox, ecologist Garrett Hardin, and psychologist Robert Sternberg. His articles have appeared on many web pages, including those of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society. He lives in Sunnyvale, California, with his Great Dane, Payce


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Format: Paperback
There are many more reviews of this book over on Amazon.com, where it is amusing to see people getting their knickers in a twist trying to trash the book. I say don't listen to them, (or even to me!); buy it and make up your own mind. Anyone (and I mean anyone) who is interested in human variation should find something of interest in this book. Sure, it will make a lot of people angry, but then so what! I personally enjoyed it enormously, but if you are of a 'PC' bent it may make your hair fall out!!! ;-)
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Format: Paperback
In this age of political correctness, it is refreshing that a mainstream publisher has published a hereditarian work dealing with that most incendiary of topics – the biology of race. Unfortunately, ‘Race: The Reality of Human Differences’ by Vincent Sarich and Frank Miele is a disappointment.

The Law
The authors begin by discussing the recognition given race in the American legal system. They cite various legal cases involving affirmative action to show, “the most adversarial part of our complex society, not only continues to accept the existence of race, but also relies on the ability of the average individual to sort people into races” (p14).

As for the claim that racial categories are socially-constructed, they note the ability of forensic scientists to identify the race of a criminal from DNA fragments (p19-23).

However, while folk-taxonomic racial categories have an ultimate basis in biological differences, they are part socially-constructed as well (e.g. the 'one-drop-rule’).

It is unfortunate that the authors restrict their analysis to US law. It would be interesting to know how the race of citizens was determined in under, say, apartheid or the Nuremberg laws.

A Race-Recognition Module?
Humans are, the authors contend, innately predisposed to racially classify. Thus, Lawrence Hirschfeld found that three-year-olds already recognise the immutable and hereditary character of racial characters (p125-7). They claim, “evolutionary psychology provides… evidence that there is a species-wide module in the human brain that predisposes us to sort the members of our species into groups based on appearance, and to distinguish between ‘us’ and ‘them’” (p31).
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book sets out to prove a very simple idea, which would be commonsense if it weren't for politically correct ideology: that races in fact do exist as a biological reality, and that they do differ in many physical and (yes) possibly mental traits.

They debunk a number of politically correct but ultimately meaningless statements (e.g. "we are all Africans", or "85% of genetic variance is within ethnic groups", or "we share 99.99% of our genes with each other"), and show how political correctness has led to distorted or outright falsified accounts of recent genetic and biological findings.

They also propose how to deal with the issues of race - one might or might not agree with them, but getting the facts straight (which is the bulk of the book) is important no matter what.
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Superb book. Only part way through but all deductions in the book are fact based and logical. But it won't impress the liberal deniers who think we (the human race) are all basically the same.
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Format: Paperback
This book should be called, "Racism: We Didn't Start It!". With the help of a mere handful of historical anecdotes (which ignore broader historical evidence), the authors stumble over themselves to prove that racism did not originate with Europeans. In particular, they refer to a few derogatory comments about Black Africans made by Greeks, Arabs, Egyptians, etc., and inflate them into sweeping generalisations about the views of the ancient world. For example, two references are made to the stele of the Twelfth Dynasty Pharaoh Sesostris III, whilst carefully ignoring the centuries-long reign of the Kushite Empire; and the destructive sweep of the Aryans from the Caucasus Mountains into India, introducing the caste system and gender oppression, is also ignored. In order to justify its premise, the core of the book relies on Sarich's extensive anthropological knowledge. Whilst very informative of itself, this data provides no definitive answers to most of the authors' claims. The book ends with the expected call to avoid racism, and seems to feel that this is the task of government to force upon individuals, rather than the consequence of a more enlightened society.
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