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ROMANS. An Exposition of Chapter 8. 17-39 The Final Perseverance of the Saints. Hardcover – 1 Dec 1975

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 472 pages
  • Publisher: The Banner of Truth Trust; First Edition edition (Dec. 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0851512313
  • ISBN-13: 978-0851512310
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 3.4 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 894,946 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Martyn Lloyd-Jones (1899-1981) was born in Wales. He was a dairyman's assistant, a political enthusiast, debater, and chief clinical assistant to Sir Thomas Harder, the King's Physician. But at the age of 27 he gave up a most promising medical career to become a preacher. He had a far-reaching influence through his ministry at Westminster Chapel in London, England from 1938-68. His published works have had an unprecedented circulation, selling in millions of copies.


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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is another great book by MLJ. His expounding of truth in Scriptures is extremely solid, straightforward, passionate and reverent! His teachings would edify both the new Christian and the student of theology. I simply love his presentation of the Bible and I highly recommend it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 18 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Witness of the Holy Spirit in the Life of the Christian 7 Jun. 2006
By Leslie Richford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is the seventh volume in Dr. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones’s epoch-making exposition of Paul’s letter to the Roman Christians and contains thirty-three Bible studies originally held in London’s Westminster Chapel in 1960 and 1961; these sermons first appeared in book form in 1974 and have been continuously in print since then, both this and the fact that the original sermons drew a thousand and more listeners being evidence of their helpfulness.

It would be impossible to summarize briefly all that Lloyd-Jones has to say here, and he has, as usual, a great deal to say (the book has no less than 438 pages, although it deals with only 13 verses of Paul!). It seems, however, that the main message of the book is as follows: In Romans 8, Paul returns to what he had been describing in Romans 5: the spiritual position of the born-again Christian. In these initial verses of Romans 8, he emphasizes in particular that Christians are the “sons of God”. This is especially evidenced by two things. One is that sons of God, that is all Christians, are “led by the Spirit”. Lloyd-Jones examines this concept and shows that its basic meaning can be applied to all who know the Lord Jesus Christ personally, and that it does not necessarily imply the kind of “personal leading” (by supposed revelation) that is sometimes talked about in more enthusiastic Christian circles. The other is that sons of God receive the “spirit of adoption”, that is, they become partakers of the “witness of the Spirit”. It is at this point that Lloyd-Jones takes a comparatively controversial stand. The “witness of the Spirit” is, for him, a personal experience that is not necessarily connected with being born again. He makes a connection between this experience and the “baptism of the Holy Spirit” and quotes extensively from the writings of 17th and 18th century Christians to prove that an overwhelming experience of God’s love and fatherhood, subsequent to conversion, used to be the norm. He draws the conclusion that Christians today, if they have not yet experienced this, should seek the kind of experience that he has been describing, as it gives the kind of assurance of salvation which cannot be obtained by mere deduction.

In the years since these sermons were held, this particular contention has been the object of considerable controversy. The more charismatically-inclined sections of Christendom have tended to quote Lloyd-Jones to support their teaching about the Holy Spirit, whereas more theologically-minded evangelicals such as John R. W. Stott have criticized Lloyd-Jones for reading more into the text than is actually there. It is not for me to solve this controversy here, and each reader will have to make up his own mind. I personally feel that although John Stott may be right as far as exegesis is concerned, Lloyd-Jones has certainly made a valid point that needs to be heeded, especially among Bible-orientated evangelicals in more traditional Protestant denominations, where the Holy Spirit tends to be treated as an abstract doctrine rather than as the Third Person of the Trinity and as the present power of God in the lives of true Christians.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Romans 8 by Lloyd-Jones Anyone who reads Charismatic Chaos by John MacArthur should also and Charismatic Chaos by John MacArthur 14 Nov. 2009
By Christina Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Anyone who reads Charismatic Chaos by John MacArthur should also read Romans Exposition of Chapter 8:5-17 The Sons of God by D. M. Lloyd-Jones before coming to any final conclusions on the topic of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit in our times. I am writing this review to encourage people to read Lloyd-Jones' extremely thorough biblical exposition of this important topic.

John MacArthur has been pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, since 1969. He has written numerous books and articles in a Reformed tradition. Wikipedia labels him "a conservative Baptist". He can be heard daily on the radio program "Grace to You". He is president of The Master's College and Seminary, a Christian university in Santa Clarita, California. John MacArthur is a deservedly well-respected authority in his field.

D. M. Lloyd-Jones was born in South Wales in 1899. First serving as a medical physician, he became a minister of a Welsh Presbyterian Church until 1938, when he went to London to serve with Dr. G. Campbell Morgan as minister of Westminster Chapel. He remained at this post for 30 years, long after Morgan's retirement in 1943. He retired from that post in 1968, but still continued to preach and write. He died in 1980. Lloyd-Jones has written volumes of evangelical/reformed theological works, many of which are compilations of his sermons. He was and is very widely read, an authority in his field.

MacArthur wrote Charismatic Chaos for the specific purpose of warning against and refuting what he perceives to be dangerous, biblically unsound teachings regarding the manifestations of the Holy Spirit in our times. His topics include speaking in tongues, experiential evidence of God's truth, prophecies today, miracles and other topics of a similar vein.

Lloyd-Jones wrote Romans-Exposition of Chapter 8:15-17-The Sons of God as one of a series of highly expository sermons given between the years of 1955 and 1968. Lloyd-Jones' book is a biblical exposition, a digging out, of the meaning of the text stated in the title.

Many people today are interested in the topic of the Holy Spirit in the Christian life. Both Lloyd-Jones and MacArthur's books speak on this topic. MacArthur's is a negative presentation dealing with what he sees as excesses and pitfalls in the charismatic segment of the church today. Lloyd-Jones' is a positive expounding of the word of God. Both can be useful in their respective spheres. They need to be read together.

If I had to choose one book over the other, I would choose Lloyd-Jones'. Compared to Lloyd-Jones' book, MacArthur's book has relatively few direct scriptural quotations. Lloyd-Jones' book is packed with them. Of course, the books were written for different reasons. I would not be encouraged to seek the Holy Spirit in my own life after reading Charismatic Chaos, but after reading Romans Exposition of Chapter 8:5-17 The Sons of God, I am highly encouraged to pray and seek out this marvelous Being, who does manifest Himself inside a person in mysterious, yet very concrete and real ways.

Lloyd-Jones is anything but a charismatic. I have read several of his books, including his exposition of Romans 7. Lloyd-Jones is a perfectionist in the field of biblical exposition. His thoroughness is extreme, often tedious, and seemingly repetitive. He examines scripture with a fine tooth comb. He is passionate, but not flamboyant. He expounds with the thoroughness of a lawyer whose own son was on trial. His presentation is flat, dry, scholarly, thoroughly non-autobiographical. In all of Romans 8:5-17, he never once gave the slightest hint of any experiences he himself may or may not have had.

And yet, Lloyd-Jones gives a great exposition of scriptural evidence for the experiential manifestation of the Holy Spirit inside the believer today. But not only today, he traces the manifestation throughout New Testament times, early church times, pre-Reformation times, post Reformation times, and throughout the last century. He quotes extensively from church fathers and famous theologians and respected preachers of all eras, who themselves experienced directly the manifestation of the Holy Spirit within themselves. He includes theologians and preachers of all denominations. He quotes extensively from all, or very nearly all, the books and letters of the New Testament.

It's not about speaking in tongues. Lloyd-Jones barely mentions that topic. He does not deny the existence of tongues today, but his purpose is very different than to expound upon phenomena. There are only one or two sentences in the whole book about tongues, although he talks extensively about the Baptism of the Holy Spirit.

Lloyd-Jones' main arguments concerning the presence of the Holy Spirit in Christian experience are presented in the eighteen chapters (Yes! Eighteen entire chapters!) dealing with the assurances of sonship given in verses 14, 15, and 16 of chapter 8. He presents the assurances in three tiers, or levels.

Before going into those verses, Lloyd-Jones states that all Christians, true Christians, born-again believers, have the Spirit of Christ, the Holy Spirit, dwelling within them. Verse 9 of Romans 8 states this very clearly. But how does a Christian become assured, or certain, of his or her salvation, since an eternity in either heaven or hell is at stake?

Verses 14 through 16 address the issue of assurance of salvation. Lloyd-Jones expounds verses 14, 15, and 16 as three distinct and separate levels of assurance. Tier one in verse 14 presents sonship in terms of the Christian's walk, his or her daily obedience to the precepts and commandments of God. Obedience to God's word indicates the presence of the Holy Spirit within. This first level is where the greatest emphasis of MacArthur's teaching resides. Both authors greatly emphasize the importance of obedience to God's word as a proof and assurance of genuine salvation. One cannot be a genuine Christian without enduring obedience to God's written word.

But Lloyd-Jones moves on to verse 15 and presents it as a distinct tier of assurance, that is, the Spirit of sonship within, which cries out, "Abba, Father". The Holy Spirit who dwells within believers impassions them to have filial feelings of affection towards God the Father. This is a level of assurance distinct from the walk of obedience to God's word. Christians indwelt by the Holy Spirit have love towards God, similar to the love of a child towards his father. This love expresses itself by crying out to God the Father in prayer, in worship, and in praise.

Verse 16 is a yet higher tier of assurance distinct from the first two. Verses 14 and 15 show what the believer expresses towards God (obedience, worship, prayer, and praise), while verse 16 shows what God Himself expresses towards the believer. It is this last tier, verse 16, which is entirely absent from MacArthur's book, Charismatic Chaos. But Lloyd-Jones presents this last tier as the crowning joy, the highest of all possible experiences a person can have in this life.

Verse 16 says in the New King James version, "The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God,". Lloyd-Jones spends eight chapters expounding this verse. He carefully shows that this verse is not a repetition in different words of either of the other two verses, 14 or 15. He expounds from scripture, comparing scripture with scripture throughout all parts of the New Testament. And, as I indicated above, he quotes from the autobiographies and writings of church theologians and preachers of all denominations and of all church ages. Clearly, something is happening in the hearts of Christians of which MacArthur's book gives no hint at all.

Lloyd-Jones states directly in more than one place that not all Christians experience this witness of the Holy Spirit within themselves. In fact, many do not. He expounds the witness of the Holy Spirit within believers as coming wholly of God. There is nothing anyone does to earn, merit, or convince God to give him or her this witness. But the Holy Spirit does so manifest in many, many Christian both today and throughout the church ages.

Based on an abundance of comparative scriptural evidence and the autobiographical writings of numerous well-respected and highly significant Christians throughout church history, Lloyd-Jones presents the conclusion that the witness of the Holy Spirit within a believer is both real and much to be desired. Therefore, he encourages all Christians to eagerly and earnestly seek this witness for themselves, mainly through prayer.

The witness does not take the form of phenomena, such as speaking in tongues, although Lloyd-Jones does not deny that such a phenomenon may exist. But the witness is much more wonderful than any external phenomena, since it is a manifestation within the heart and subjective experience of a believer of the very Person of God Himself.

In conclusion, anyone interested in knowing the Holy Spirit should read Charismatic Chaos by John MacArthur, but more importantly, Romans Exposition of Chapter 8.5-17 The Sons of God by D.Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The former book may spare the reader from falling into certain pitfalls, but the latter book will ground the believer in biblical and historical reasons for pursuing an intimate knowledge of this great and Holy person of the triune God.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 Meaty Expositions of Paul from a moderate Calvinist viewpoint 19 July 2006
By Leslie Richford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Dr. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Romans: An Exposition of Chapter 8:17-39. The Final Perseverance of the Saints. First published in 1975 by the Banner of Truth Trust, Edinburgh, Scotland. xii, 457 pages. Hard-cover with dust-jacket.

This is the eighth volume in Martyn Lloyd-Jones's series of Bible Studies from Paul's Epistle to the Romans. It is also the last volume that Lloyd-Jones himself prepared for publication. These studies were first preached in the form of sermons on Friday evenings between May 1961 and May 1962 (at London's Westminster Chapel, a free evangelical church). It covers the last two-thirds of the eighth chapter of Romans in which the Apostle follows up what he has been saying before, both in chapter 5, in chapters 6 and 7 and at the beginning of chapter 8. After dealing with suffering in the life of the Christian, Paul goes on to examine the basis for assurance and certainty in the Christian life. His conclusions are some of the most wonderful verses in all of Scripture: Verse 28 says, "We know that all things work together for good to them that love God and are the called according to His purpose." In verses 29 and 30 Paul goes on to detail the purpose of God, tracing it from "foreknowledge" or "election" through "predestination" to "calling", "justification" and final "glorification." Then, on the basis of what he has so clearly stated, he reaches his climactic statement that "Nothing ... can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus."

Lloyd-Jones preaches 36 times in a row on these verses, explaining practically every nuance and often referring to the Greek text and to translations or comments by modern scholars. However, he does not do this in a way that is at all dry or theoretical; rather, he is at pains to make each sermon speak to the heart and challenge the mind. After the initial section on suffering and on the "eager expectation of the creature", Lloyd-Jones goes on to examine very thoroughly the "ordo salutis" of verses 28 to 30, spending no less than seventeen weeks (seventeen sermons) on these verses. As an intellectual evangelical Calvinist, Lloyd-Jones defends the inspiration of the Apostle and brings out clearly what, if all philosophical considerations are left out, he must have meant. Lloyd-Jones quotes a large number of parallel texts to support his theses and is also careful to show how these verses are a logical continuation of what Paul has already said, as well as preparing the ground for what he will say later in chapters 9 through 11. The doctrinal position that must be drawn from these verses is the one usually known as the "Perseverance of the Saints". Lloyd-Jones defends this doctrine at length, examining a whole battery of Bible verses which are often quoted as disproving the doctrine. His exposition is very clear and logical, although I think, in the end, there is perhaps less difference between his position and that of his evangelical opponents than he would have admitted: The opponents say a born-again Christan can fall away from grace, Lloyd-Jones says (and I must summarize very briefly) that those who do finally fall away were not really born again in the first place (but probably had some kind of psychological experience).

However you stand on this issue, reading Lloyd-Jones should give you a fresh insight into what the Scriptural text is really saying and at the same time challenge you personally on the issue of assurance. This is "meaty" material that can provide ample inspiration for preachers and leaders of home Bible studies.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Romans The Sons of God and Charismatic Chaos 14 Nov. 2009
By Christina Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
Anyone who reads Charismatic Chaos should also read Romans Exposition of Chapter 8:5-17 The Sons of God before coming to any final conclusions on the topic of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit in our times. I am writing this review to encourage people to read D. M. Lloyd-Jones' extremely thorough theological exposition of this important topic.

John MacArthur has been pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, since 1969. He has written numerous books and articles in a Reformed tradition. Wikipedia labels him "a conservative Baptist". He can be heard daily on the radio program "Grace to You". He is president of The Master's College and Seminary, a Christian university in Santa Clarita, California. John MacArthur is a deservedly well-respected authority in his field.

D. M. Lloyd-Jones was born in South Wales in 1899. First serving as a medical physician, he became a minister of a Welsh Presbyterian Church until 1938, when he went to London to serve with Dr. G. Campbell Morgan as minister of Westminster Chapel. He remained at this post for 30 years, long after Morgan's retirement in 1943. He retired from that post in 1968, but still continued to preach and write. He died in 1980. Lloyd-Jones has written volumes of evangelical/reformed theological works, many of which are compilations of his sermons. He was and is very widely read, an authority in his field.

MacArthur wrote Charismatic Chaos for the specific purpose of warning against and refuting what he perceives to be dangerous, biblically unsound teachings regarding the manifestations of the Holy Spirit in our times. His topics include speaking in tongues, experiential evidence of God's truth, prophecies today, miracles and other topics of a similar vein.

Lloyd-Jones wrote Romans-Exposition of Chapter 8:15-17-The Sons of God as one of a series of highly expository sermons given between the years of 1955 and 1968. Lloyd-Jones' book is a biblical exposition, a digging out, of the meaning of the text stated in the title.

Many people today are interested in the topic of the Holy Spirit in the Christian life. Both Lloyd-Jones and MacArthur's books speak on this topic. MacArthur's is a negative presentation dealing with what he sees as excesses and pitfalls in the charismatic segment of the church today. Lloyd-Jones' is a positive expounding of the word of God. Both can be useful in their respective spheres. They need to be read together.

If I had to choose one book over the other, I would choose Lloyd-Jones'. Compared to Lloyd-Jones' book, MacArthur's book has relatively few direct scriptural quotations. Lloyd-Jones' book is packed with them. Of course, the books were written for different reasons. I would not be encouraged to seek the Holy Spirit in my own life after reading Charismatic Chaos, but after reading Romans Exposition of Chapter 8:5-17 The Sons of God, I am highly encouraged to pray and seek out this marvelous Being, who does manifest Himself inside a person in mysterious, yet very concrete and real ways.

Lloyd-Jones is anything but a charismatic. I have read several of his books, including his exposition of Romans 7. Lloyd-Jones is a perfectionist in the field of biblical exposition. His thoroughness is extreme, often tedious, and seemingly repetitive. He examines scripture with a fine tooth comb. He is passionate, but not flamboyant. He expounds with the thoroughness of a lawyer whose own son was on trial. His presentation is flat, dry, scholarly, thoroughly non-autobiographical. In all of Romans 8:5-17, he never once gave the slightest hint of any experiences he himself may or may not have had.

And yet, Lloyd-Jones gives a great exposition of scriptural evidence for the experiential manifestation of the Holy Spirit inside the believer today. But not only today, he traces the manifestation throughout New Testament times, early church times, pre-Reformation times, post Reformation times, and throughout the last century. He quotes extensively from church fathers and famous theologians and respected preachers of all eras, who themselves experienced directly the manifestation of the Holy Spirit within themselves. He includes theologians and preachers of all denominations. He quotes extensively from all, or very nearly all, the books and letters of the New Testament.

It's not about speaking in tongues. Lloyd-Jones barely mentions that topic. He does not deny the existence of tongues today, but his purpose is very different than to expound upon phenomena. There are only one or two sentences in the whole book about tongues, although he talks extensively about the Baptism of the Holy Spirit.

Lloyd-Jones' main arguments concerning the presence of the Holy Spirit in Christian experience are presented in the eighteen chapters (Yes! Eighteen entire chapters!) dealing with the assurances of sonship given in verses 14, 15, and 16 of chapter 8. He presents the assurances in three tiers, or levels.

Before going into those verses, Lloyd-Jones states that all Christians, true Christians, born-again believers, have the Spirit of Christ, the Holy Spirit, dwelling within them. Verse 9 of Romans 8 states this very clearly. But how does a Christian become assured, or certain, of his or her salvation, since an eternity in either heaven or hell is at stake?

Verses 14 through 16 address the issue of assurance of salvation. Lloyd-Jones expounds verses 14, 15, and 16 as three distinct and separate levels of assurance. Tier one in verse 14 presents sonship in terms of the Christian's walk, his or her daily obedience to the precepts and commandments of God. Obedience to God's word indicates the presence of the Holy Spirit within. This first level is where the greatest emphasis of MacArthur's teaching resides. Both authors greatly emphasize the importance of obedience to God's word as a proof and assurance of genuine salvation. One cannot be a genuine Christian without enduring obedience to God's written word.

But Lloyd-Jones moves on to verse 15 and presents it as a distinct tier of assurance, that is, the Spirit of sonship within, which cries out, "Abba, Father". The Holy Spirit who dwells within believers impassions them to have filial feelings of affection towards God the Father. This is a level of assurance distinct from the walk of obedience to God's word. Christians indwelt by the Holy Spirit have love towards God, similar to the love of a child towards his father. This love expresses itself by crying out to God the Father in prayer, in worship, and in praise.

Verse 16 is a yet higher tier of assurance distinct from the first two. Verses 14 and 15 show what the believer expresses towards God (obedience, worship, prayer, and praise), while verse 16 shows what God Himself expresses towards the believer. It is this last tier, verse 16, which is entirely absent from MacArthur's book, Charismatic Chaos. But Lloyd-Jones presents this last tier as the crowning joy, the highest of all possible experiences a person can have in this life.

Verse 16 says in the New King James version, "The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God,". Lloyd-Jones spends eight chapters expounding this verse. He carefully shows that this verse is not a repetition in different words of either of the other two verses, 14 or 15. He expounds from scripture, comparing scripture with scripture throughout all parts of the New Testament. And, as I indicated above, he quotes from the autobiographies and writings of church theologians and preachers of all denominations and of all church ages. Clearly, something is happening in the hearts of Christians of which MacArthur's book gives no hint at all.

Lloyd-Jones states directly in more than one place that not all Christians experience this witness of the Holy Spirit within themselves. In fact, many do not. He expounds the witness of the Holy Spirit within believers as coming wholly of God. There is nothing anyone does to earn, merit, or convince God to give him or her this witness. But the Holy Spirit does so manifest in many, many Christian both today and throughout the church ages.

Based on an abundance of comparative scriptural evidence and the autobiographical writings of numerous well-respected and highly significant Christians throughout church history, Lloyd-Jones presents the conclusion that the witness of the Holy Spirit within a believer is both real and much to be desired. Therefore, he encourages all Christians to eagerly and earnestly seek this witness for themselves, mainly through prayer.

The witness does not take the form of phenomena, such as speaking in tongues, although Lloyd-Jones does not deny that such a phenomenon may exist. But the witness is much more wonderful than any external phenomena, since it is a manifestation within the heart and subjective experience of a believer of the very Person of God Himself.

In conclusion, anyone interested in knowing the Holy Spirit should read Charismatic Chaos by John MacArthur, but more importantly, Romans Exposition of Chapter 8.5-17 The Sons of God by D.Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The former book may spare the reader from falling into certain pitfalls, but the latter book will ground the believer in biblical and historical reasons for pursuing an intimate knowledge of this great and Holy person of the triune God.
5.0 out of 5 stars PERSEVERE WITH MARTYN LLOYD-JONES 17 Nov. 2014
By A Grandmother - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to admit that I have not actually read this particular book in the series on Romans by Martyn-Lloyd Jones because I'm in a Bible study on Romans and we have not reached the 8th chapter as yet. The 5 stars are because I have read other volumes in the series on Romans and other books by Martyn Lloyd Jones and cannot imagine this one being anything but up to par with the rest of the books. Romans is so very, very important to understanding the salvation in which we stand! He is very thorough, easy to understand and my favorite author.
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