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The Quantum Universe: Everything that can happen does happen Paperback – 21 Jun 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 320 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (21 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241952700
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241952702
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (320 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,055 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

A scientific match made in heaven...as breezily a written accessible account of the theory of quantum mechanics as you could wish for - from the Planck constant to the Higgs particle and everything theoretically in between (Observer)

Mindblowing ... what is novel about this attempt is that the writers take an intellectual rather than a historical approach ... it is a surprisingly rich idea that allows the authors to avoid using too much mathematics (Christopher Potter Sunday Times)

[Cox and Forshaw] stand together at the cutting edge of their discipline ... despite their elevated status, both men remain tiggerishly excitable about their subject ... Cox and Forshaw's book is a carefully guided tour through this quantum world ... popularize[s] without dumbing down (Christopher Cook Financial Times)

A thrilling voyage into the subatomic world (The Economist Books of the Year)

With brightness and gusto, the opening chapters deal with the culture shock that thinking about the sub-atomic world entails ...They are good at drawing connections between seemingly esoteric theory and everyday practicalities (Doug Johnstone Independent on Sunday)

The rock star of science... In Quantum Universe they do a great job of bringing a difficult subject to life (Hannah Devlin The Times)

Breaks the rules of popular science writing...admirably shies away from dumbing down...the authors' love for their subject-matter shines through the book (The Economist)

Admirably, Cox and Forshaw...treat topics that do not usually show up in popular books...readers will enjoy this engaging, ambitious and creative tour of our quantum universe (David Kaiser The Guardian)

By explaining theories about the world, Cox and Forshaw show that the workings of the universe can be understood by us all (Fanny Blake Woman & Home)

Book Description

From the writers of Why Does E equal mc2?, a highly engaging and accessible explanation of Quantum Mechanics and why it matters. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Have only just started the book and it will take me a while to get through as I have to factor all those staring into space trying to get my head around the information moments. That said it a fascinating read so far and written so that it is relatively straight forward (in a mind blowing way) to read. Highly recommend anyone interested in the wonder that is our universe to take some time and give it a go.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This ebook needs to be reviewed at two levels - as a book, and as a reading experience on a Kindle. As a book it offers a very clear explanation of what are some very wierd areas of modern science and is well worth reading. I'm glad I did. BUT on a kindle the diagrams - of which there are plenty of important ones - just do not work. If you come to this ebook with a good grounding in modern physics, you'll survive but be really annoyed. If you rely on understanding diagrams to help you through a book like this, stick to print. (It may be okay on Apple devices. I don't know.)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting book about a confusing subject, I enjoyed it
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book great read
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
awesome book, can get extremely complicated though !
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good value
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Format: Paperback
Mmmm...with the name of such a well-known TV personality on the cover, this book will probably disappoint many who are looking for a popular "explanation" of quantum mechanics (if such a thing were possible). I may be wrong, but I get a strong impression that the book is culled from lecture notes by the other author, with the name of the popular guy added chiefly to expand the probability wave function of the sales. But perhaps I am too cynical.

I'm a retired Electronics Engineer, so I'm reasonably familiar with wave theory,Fourier analysis,vectors and the like, and it was reassuring to know that abstract probability waves could be treated in a very similar way to any electromagnetic waves such as light or sound waves. The authors choose to represent their amplitude and phase by "clocks" (why don't they just call them "vectors"?)and with great enthusiasm spend rather a lot of tedious time manipulating them. I think it would be better if they had concentrated on expounding the principles and leaving out much of the calculation. As an oldie, I am too mentally lazy to follow such detail, and I suspect I am not alone in this respect among potential readers. It is not that the individual steps are so difficult to follow; it is more that it is hard to retain all that has gone before when taking the next step. I do blame the authors for the densely packed way they present the information; I have recently read John Gribbin's book "In Search of Schroedinger's Cat", which I found gives a much more digestible overall view of the subject. So I would not recommend the book under review to the layman in search of an easy introduction to quantum mechanics.
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Format: Paperback
What a fantastic read! I can now say I completely and utterly, with crystal clarity, understand Quantum Physics. Or not. I won't know until I'm observed reading this book and my waveform collapses. If you get that poor joke, then this book will make sense to you. If you didn't get it, then buy the book and read it. Soon after reading this book you may well awake at 2 in the morning howling with laughter at that poor joke of mine. If you are at all interested in particle physics but have yet to penetrate the language, let alone the maths, then this is the primer for you. It sets out in clear language what we believe to be going on in the sub-atomic world, which simply cannot be possible. There are some daunting equations and graphs in the book but understanding those is not essential to understanding the general thrust of the book which is : the sub-atomic world does not behave in any way, shape or (wave)form that our brains, which have been hardwired to understand the world through 5 senses, can make sense of. We make sense of the world, our paradigm if you like, through our five senses. We cannot sense or even measure to any degree of accuracy what occurs at the sub-atomic level but we can deduce. These deductions based on theory, observational correlation (not least from the LHC) and extrapolation therefrom, expose the domain of the really, really small as really, really bizarre. That's the fun and the challenge. Reading the assumptions and propositions set out in this book will really open your eyes to the appalling strangeness of our universe. So if the title of this book is true, then somewhere, somewhen there is a me that totally understands quantum physics, and I HATE him!
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