Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
23
4.5 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 30 November 2011
I've been a fan of RAW for a year now, and Prometheus Rising really opened up a lot of things for me.
The last four months I've been reading dozens of books on quantum physics, the holographic model, the Vedas, and spirituality.
If you know very little about quantum physics or modern philosophy this book can really be an eye opener and a helpful guide to further investigation.

However, and this won't be popular, though the book is very well written, both amusing and intelligent, and even though Wilson really knows what he is speaking about, I did not agree whole-heartedly with all of Wilsons assertions. I should make very clear that this is a subjective and deeply personal objection, as should be obvious to any Wilson reader, and I do not have any real education to object. I still found this book very entertaining and thought-provoking. I guess it's a small and insignificant objection, and I'm sure Wilson has a better foundation for his claims, but for me it seems that a deeper reality, one that to me appears universal, really exists. (Notice the E-Primer, the exclusion of "is"! I still love Wilson and Korzybski, don't get me wrong)

I agree much more with Prometheus, in fact I had no objections. With this book I have one small objection, but that doesn't in any way lessen the impact, genius, legacy, and importance of this book in my library.

Namaste.
11 comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 September 2002
For people that whine and whinge, there can be no escape. We all know what it is to feel low, like there is nothing to hope for. This title offers the reader the chance to psycho-analyse thier existance, and the relationship between themselves and that which touches them, and enforce thier own positive feed-back into that existance. Not one day has gone by without me linking an example or lesson from this text, and profiting from it.
Peace of mind is only a read away.
0Comment| 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 May 2003
Undeniably one of Wilsons best books, and a real eye-opener if you've not read much about human consciousness, the influence of language on our thinking, or on how the mind works.
I found the third and last part of his book to be somewhat less factual (bordering on something between realistic fiction and wishful thinking), but the first two parts easily make up for it.
I wish someone had made me read this earlier in my life - so much insight in so few pages (it's kind-of like the babylon fish :)..
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Robert Anton Wilson said that we only really have two choices when we get out of bed in the morning. We can choose to be pessimists or we can choose to be optimists; there is no third way; it truly is that simple. However, Wilson argues that most people don't get it because they are so bogged down in their life situation, they become what they experience; a dark cloud replaces the sunshine for these people, and they end up believing the in the sh't that they have been consuming, that the box is reality and some even become deterministic in character. Wilson said that lost souls always choose pessimism and the more rational choose nihilism, all of the time. Wilson, on the other hand, chose babbling optimism, all of the time and so shall I. Optimism is the best way of seeing the world because we do have a choice, which is the point, isn't it?

So this is why Robert Anton Wilson chose to be an optimist; because he would rather write about he himself being God Almighty than the other guy being God Almighty, the trendier, and easier, moaning about materialism and science and the darkening of colour that these ontologies cause in our lives, and, to add to this moaning, also the way intelligent people choose a nihilist picture, instead of recognising the God within; you get the picture, I hope. Robert Anton Wilson was not belittling the nihilists because, well if we are honest, most people see the world as a machinery of hell, with little purpose but to war, die and to ruin even that! For nihilists, the shattered God still dwells in his ruins; but He is a ghost who is never to be taken seriously again because no one believes in him anymore, like Father Christmas, a skeleton of stones amongst the ruins of the world. Do you see how this worldview easily turns into the belief, no, the worship, of nothingness? Now for optimists to deny this logic would be disrespectful to their life situation. History confirms the evil, they say, and science argues that they are void anyway, or biological robots and, to paraphrase Marc Antony, I have neither the wit, nor the words, nor worth; action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, to stir men's blood. Instead, I choose optimism and this is as good as it gets.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 August 2015
Sometimes too radical views, no nuances, but nonetheless interesting take to read about. Either as a curiosity, either as a need to get another perspective, the theories put forward will for sure entertain you a bit. Or make you think, the same or the other way, it does not matter so much.
Not boring, but sometimes repetitive and stubborn. Which can also be fun.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 May 2003
Undeniably one of Wilsons best books, and a real eye-opener if you've not read much about human consciousness, the influence of language on our thinking, or on how the mind works.
I found the third and last part of his book to be somewhat less factual (bordering on something between realistic fiction and wishful thinking), but the first two parts easily make up for it.
I wish someone had made me read this earlier in my life - so much insight in so few pages (it's kind-of like the babylon fish :)..
11 comment| 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 December 2002
Quite simply (unlike some of the above reviews), one of the most important books you could possible read. Read it a few times and you'll soon start to understand a simple "truth", as Bucky Fuller used to put it, "I seem to be a verb". We all have the capacity to recreate our selves in any form we want in every new moment in space-time...or something.
0Comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 May 2011
I loved the book and RAW (reported missing from this part of time; I sadly suspect he's really gone this time).

There was only one of his books that I found impenetrable/annoying/unpleasing and I have read most of them (The one where every bunch of words explodes and MIRVs repeatedly in one's mind, like a definition in a Turkish-English dictionary or a box full of capsules of scout ants; I don't recall its name and it's behind two stacks of books acquired since: not handy.). Maybe he used cut-ups.

Amazon says I bought Quantum Psychology in 1975, so it's been a while since I read it but only yesterday I caught myself saying "infophobic" under my breath about a baby on the bus.

RAW likens the developing mind to electronic orbitals (energy levels or quantum states of electrons), laid down in order as you move down the periodic table, but then adds a dialectical dimension, an axis, (maybe a spin quantum #) for at least the first three. Infophobia-Infophilia is like the 1S electronic orbital, the first to be filled. I am so glad that I turned out infophilic.

You might think of the model as being an inner set of the layers of the onion that EST (Erhard Seminars Training) workshops sought to strip down. However, wave-mechanical views of electrons are dynamic and probabilistic rather than the rigid shells of earlier electronic theory and the layers of real onions.

He acknowledges a debt to Timothy Leary but his atomic/quantum way of looking at how minds and personalities are put together, made of definite components, is a vast improvement upon those proposed by other psychologists/psychiatrists who try to boil us down to a will to power, sex drive, etc.. He also points out that we don't need to be stuck with our psychological configuration but can change it, maybe with a little help from our friends.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 June 1999
A book entirely devoted to exploring the "model agnosticism" implicit in all of Wilson's books, yet (seems to me) largely free of the goofy leg-pulling and New Age glaze that sometimes clouds the "message" of other books such as Cosmic Trigger. This book should be required reading for every human on the planet.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 February 2012
This is one of the most intelligent and challenging books I have ever read. I can't tell you how long it took me to get through it. It's incredibly heavy, synthesizing as it does, a vast array of different ideas to come up with a perspective that is both profoundly illuminating and completely contradictory to accepted wisdom. If you're buying this it would help if you had a basic understanding of psychology and physics, or a lot of time on your hands! All of his ideas really need to be explored in your own life. Like all Wilson's books, this is about deprogramming beliefs in order to come to a greater understanding of the world. This can be a painful process if you have a lot of firm beliefs.I had to spend a lot of time thinking about some of his ideas and letting them sink in before I could accept them or even start to unravel their implications. Whether you accept them or not, he was an incredibly intelligent man and the ideas he sets out here warrant a great deal of examination.

Wilson argues that reality is subject to neurological relativity. That everything from our individual perceptions and thoughts about the world to the very idea of objective reality may be erroneous.But this isn't sophistry. It has a very clear and noble purpose, to get us to transcend our habit of making judgements about definite reality, so that we can grow intellectually and be more understanding of each other.

Unlike some of his books, he chose to adopt a "scientific" perspective in writing this. In other books he approaches the same ideas from a more trickster-like or mystical perspective. For this reason, this comes across as less subjective and I warrant will appeal to wider section of people, even if you interest is purely confined to the quantum/scientific elements of his thesis.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)