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Quantum Field Theory Paperback – 26 Oct 1993

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Paperback, 26 Oct 1993
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Product details

  • Paperback: 372 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 2nd Revised edition edition (26 Oct. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471941867
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471941866
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.1 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,566,755 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"...designed as a short and simple introduction to quantum field theory for students beginning research in theoretical and experimental analysis." (Zentralblatt MATH, Vol. 972, 2001/22)

From the Back Cover

Quantum Field Theory Revised Edition F. Mandl and G. Shaw, Department of Theoretical Physics, The Schuster Laboratory, The University, Manchester, UK When this book first appeared in 1984, only a handful of W ± and Z° bosons had been observed and the experimental investigation of high energy electro–weak interactions was in its infancy. Nowadays, W ± bosons and especially Z° bosons can be produced by the thousand and the study of their properties is a precise science. We have revised the text of the later chapters to incorporate these developments and discuss their implications. We have also taken this opportunity to update the references throughout and to make some improvements in the treatment of dimen–sional regularization. Finally, we have corrected some minor errors and are grateful to various people for pointing these out. This book is designed as a short and simple introduction to quantum field theory for students beginning research in theoretical and experimental physics. The three main objectives are to explain the basic physics and formalism of quantum field theory, to make the reader fully proficient in theory calculations using Feynman diagrams, and to introduce the reader to gauge theories, which play such a central role in elementary particle physics. The theory is applied to quantum electrodynamics (QED), where quantum field theory had its early triumphs, and to weak interactions where the standard electro–weak theory has had many impressive successes. The treatment is based on the canonical quantization method, because readers will be familiar with this, because it brings out lucidly the connection between invariance and conservation laws, and because it leads directly to the Feynman diagram techniques which are so important in many branches of physics. In order to help inexperienced research students grasp the meaning of the theory and learn to handle it confidently, the mathematical formalism is developed from first principles, its physical interpretation is stressed at every point and its use is illustrated in detailed applications. After studying this book, the reader should be able to calculate any process in lowest order of perturbation theory for both QED and the standard electro–weak theory, and in addition, calculate lowest order radiative corrections in QED using the powerful technique of dimensional regularization. Contents: Preface; 1 Photons and electromagnetic field; 2 Lagrangian field theory; 3 The Klein Gordon field; 4 The Dirac field; 5 Photons: covariant theory; 6 The S–matrix expansion; 7 Feynman diagrams and rules in QED; 8 QED processes in lowest order; 9 Radiative corrections; 10 Regularization; 11 Weak interactions; 13 Spontaneous symmetry breaking; 14 The standard electro–weak theory; Appendix A The Dirac equation; Appendix B Feynman rules and formulae for perturbation theory; Index.

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Format: Paperback
A very good first book for someone having the necessary background in Quantum Theory. Covers the essentials in the subject of Field Theory. Easier to penetrate than Weinbergs recent "field theory bible".
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
clean and new copy, very good introduction to qft
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very poor book, constantly uses symbols that haven't been defined, impossible to follow unless you already know the topic it is covering. Good for a review, not for learning the subject.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 12 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars okay 25 Jun. 2014
By D.amazon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
used this book as textbook for a class, not too bad to read. not too hard to understand, but still needs quite effort. some of the homework problems are good. don't think it's good for beginners. probably won't read it again after passing the course.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best introduction books 3 April 2014
By Nate - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a tough call between this and Klaubers "Student Friendly Quantum Field Theory" for who has the best true introduction to QFT. Klauber is certainly more thorough and he painstakingly goes through every single possible step. So if you pretty much can't get caught. This book is less thorough in walking through steps, but it doesn't seem to be a problem. The book is still fantastically easy to learn from. You can't go wrong with either text. It certainly would be nice to have both.

One thing to point out is that this text covers many more topics than Klaubers. Klauber stops at renormalizability of QED. This book continues through QCD and the electroweak theory.

I guess you could say that Klauber makes a great companion for a QFT1 course through basic QED while Mandl/Shaw will take you all the way through a first year curriculum.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Formulas hard to read in kindle 3 Jan. 2014
By Rolf Marius Aase Solberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great to have this book in a digital format, but the formulas are scanned, and hard to read (at least on an iPad). Hope the formulas will be LaTeXified in future editions.
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars So, this is QFT? 19 Jun. 2005
By V. Puller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I never had a formal QFT course in my life, so I was curious to learn it on my own. My curiosity was only incresed by what is called "QFT methods in condensed matter physics", which I am exposed to quite a bit.

The book by Mandl and Shaw is certainly easy to read. In my case I obtained some idea about how the diagrammatic techniques look in covariant form. However, many questions I had had are still left unanswered. While it is obvious that the book is out of date, and it is hard to blame the authors for that, there is no even brief overview of the field and the basic problems it faced in that period. There is no mentioning of the approaches altenative to diagrammatic techniques. In general, the book is not very systematic, but rather present more detailed solutions for several problems that the reader is assumed to be already familiar with. Therefore, I assume, the book is good only as a supplementary material for those studying diagrammatic methods for QFT.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful introduction to QFT 12 Jan. 2008
By Ryoji Watanabe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I just want to contribute my five stars.

I'm not a specialist or active in this field, but I enjoy trying to to keep up with interesting things I was led to in college. Hence perhaps I provide the ideal perspective of the perpetual student...

I have several of the other standard texts, which I have at least perused to understand their level and approach. I find Mandl and Shaw to be the best *introduction*. Here are some reasons I like it:

- It is the best book of the bunch that is both completely deep in what it covers and self-contained (but of course it strictly assumes the implicit prerequisites: core quantum mechanics and everything you are likely to have studied if you studied that).
- It focues on the canonical approach. I'm a rabid Feynman worshipper, but in my opinion the path integral approach is best left to the second pass, because it requires two hurdles: a math one-- path calculus--, and a physics one-- shifting focus to the Lagrangian approach to QM. I find the canonical approach a better continuation of core quantum mechanics, hence a better entry point. So learn to count breadth-first; and then have fun discovering you can count it depth-first too.
- The text has a thoughtful logical order of development: Spin 0, 1/2, 1... I think I see a pattern...

Lastly, it is sprinkled with really physically deep commentary on results. Eg, how to understand spin and statistics; or when they frankly describe high-k regularization (a.k.a. math fudging) as possibly modeling new real physics. This arena is both foundational and cutting-edge-- "unfinished"; I like it that they tell it as it is.
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