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Pull Yourself Together Audio CD – Audiobook, 23 Oct 2012

3.2 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Audiobook, 23 Oct 2012
£4.61 £14.63
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Corporation; Unabridged edition (23 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1469209675
  • ISBN-13: 978-1469209678
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 2.9 x 14 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Thomas Glavinic is considered one of the guiding voices in Austrian literature. Born in 1972, he is the author of several novels, as well as a number of essays and short stories. His work has garnered both critical acclaim and commercial success and has been translated into sixteen languages. The Camera Killer was awarded the 2002 Friedrich-Glauser Prize for crime fiction and Glavinic was short-listed for the German Book Prize in 2007. Pull Yourself Together reached the top of the Austrian bestseller list. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I found this book very difficult to get on with. It's not badly written. The opposite in fact. The characterisation of the narrator is very sharply defined and we see the world through his eyes and from his point of view. The trouble was, I couldn't bear him. He is an unattractive, facetious, posturing, idle waste of space whose charm was not sufficient to keep me interested.

I know that some people have found this book hugely amusing, so it really does depend on whether or not you can cope with Charlie. I suggest you look inside and have a taster. You will be able to decide very quickly which side of the fence you are standing on as he comes at you full blast from the word go.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was attracted to this by the description of being a coming-of-age story with a likeness to The Royal Tenebaums - two things I like a lot - but I was mildly disappointed. It's not much like them at all. The story follows a boy growing up and is largely focused on his lustful feelings towards girls, parts of his family life weaved in and bits of various jobs and activities, but generally the plot seems to add and remove events without much explanation or understandable relevance. It's hard to remain engaged as mid way through it just seems to go nowhere, the plot does not thicken as they say - and unfortunately this just results in skim reading from boredom. The idea of it being written in second person is also very annoying - creative and interesting at the start but after realising it lasts through the whole book, it loses it's charm and it just feels like you're being told what to think.

There are a few sentences of great writing here and there, and it starts off great, but overall it wasn't really worth reading. It just lacks so much depth, the main character is weak and unrelateable, and this might be down to my own personal stupidity but it was hard to understand the purpose of any of the storyline.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really liked Austrian novelist Thomas Glavinic's last book, 'Night Work', which was taught, mysterious sort-of-thriller/dystopian fantasy, vaguely in the mould of Kafka. I was expecting more of the same but 'Pull Yourself Together' is absolutely nothing like it at all... although I enjoyed it nevertheless, for what it is: a smart, wry, character-driven satire, with an almost cinematic quality, redolent of some US indie movie like 'Rushmore'... to build on the previous reviewer's (spot-on) Wes Anderson comparison. Good then, but not expected.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
To be truth to people around, one must be drunk. But you can't be drunk all the time unless u r a politician or a journalist!!!! Good read, the story flows easily and u can't say fiction from reality. The style is good except of the notes. Why did the author need to bring in 3 deaths by the main character??? Does not sound plausible and therefore 3 stars even though we recognize ourselves in Charlie's multiple faces
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Format: Kindle Edition
Charlie is a Nietsche-reading slacker who worries more about how his is perceived by others than by how he actually feels. He dreams of being a rock star and tries to bed as many women as possible. You get the picture.

But Pull Yourself Together is more than the tale of a self-proclaimed wimp. The story reads like a Wes Anderson - with every shot considered and carefully presented, and a cast of quirky, fascinating characters.

As Charlie faces his comeuppance, the book galvanises around him; the story is one of redemption, and is at times funny, moving and sad. I highly recommend this new voice.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Thomas Glavinic is a young Austrian writer who has won various awards and scholarships in his home country. Pull Yourself Together is the third of his books to be translated into English. Its a sort of coming-of-age novel about Austrian teenager Charlie Colustrum, an over-weight boy with bad skin who lives with his alcoholic mother.

The book opens on the night Challenger space shuttle broke up in mid-flight in 1986, and finds Charlie about to lose his virginity with his first girl-friend. We then follow the course of Charlie's youth and young-adulthood through to the night in 2003 when the space-shuttle Columbia broke up on re-entry. I suppose that as far as marking the path of a life goes these markers are as good as any!

Although Charlie's mother is an alcoholic he has a number of close relatives including the "aunticles" (a pair of stern and demanding sisters), and a very old great aunt who acts as a fount of wisdom and a refuge for Charlie when he needs top-ups of unconditional love or much-needed schillings (this is pre-euro days of course).

Each chapter records various events in Charlie's life as he moves through seventeen years of his life. Despite his weight (a constant worry to him), he manages to get through several girl-friends during his progress through college and on to a variety of jobs. The story is told in the first person and Charlie has a self-deprecating, ironic voice which allows the readers to hear his inner commentary on the things which happen to him.

Charlie likes to think of himself as a philosopher and attempts to cover up his sense of inadequacy by wearing a black cloak and carrying around volumes by Nietzsche and Kant. In reality he is consumed with superstitious fears and has an unhealthy dependence on self-help guides.
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