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Customer reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
2

VINE VOICEon 21 October 2009
A classic little work from Jung. It's a quick read but also a must read that you'll want to come back to again. It benefits from being written as a lecture and as a consequence of this it is immensely readable. In this respect it differs sharply from the academic tone and content that he employs in books such 'The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious'.
Insightful and at times incredibly profound,he makes some points about the human condition that everyone needs to take on board - particularly in these times when society and mankind is in danger of losing its soul. Try getting your head around this one Dawkins - this book is the antidote for a rampant intellect!
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on 7 October 2004
It is hard to rate this book in terms of stars. This book is typical of Jung in its analysis of the psychology of religious experience. Jung selects the dreams of one particular patient to serve as a platform for his penetrating insights in this thin volume, which is actually an edited transcript of some 3 lectures given at Yale in the 1930s. This is a relatively thin book (120 pages or so) and so it's a quick read. This is not an introduction to Jung's most famous assertions about the collective unconscious, archetypes or the anima/animus concepts although these do crop up when appropriate in discussion about religion and psychology. There is some interesting discussion about the nature of the Trinity (and Quaternity) as a psychological phenomenon and its impact in that respect.
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