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Programming the Human Bio-Computer Paperback – 29 Apr 2004

3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Ronin Publishing; Abridged By Potter; Abridged Edition edition (29 April 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579510655
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579510657
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 563,758 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
'Programming and Metaprogramming in the Human Biocomputer' made by Dr. John C. Lilly is a reprint of a very important scientific book that was written almost fifty years ago, still being the most sincere and well-made try to explain and examine the psychedelic experience while using LSD.

Besides those subject Lilly discusses the invention of float tanks, communication with dolphins and other interesting things related to our brain, or as he called it - human biocomputer.

Certainly, Dr. John C. Lilly was a different type of scientist who has turned his back on the academic community to perform research about things that no matter how interesting were still for a long time taboo.

Therefore, if you want to read a scientific book which though fifty years old is today as fresh as in 60s when it was written, you will not regret it if you will select 'Programming and Metaprogramming in the Human Biocomputer’. Writing it Lilly managed to create work that in same time uses scientific approach and particular personal inner states.
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As outlined by the previous reviewer, John Lilly was an incredible genius, who took the rare steps to explore his mind as scientifically and impartially as possible, using tools such as the floatation tank, and LSD. This book should be a tour de force.

Instead, it is highly abstract to the point of irrelevancy. The title gives an indication that it is of practical use, whereas it is really a general discussion of Lilly's experiments, without any specifics of how the results were obtained. The finished book is therefore of little practical use, and will provide very frustrating reading to most folks.

The most accessible chapter is chapter 6, as he gives plenty of examples to demonstrate what he is talking about, and it deals with mainstream psychology. However, the rest of the book leaves the reader struggling to penetrate this very dense material.
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Format: Paperback
Lilly was one of the greatest scientists and pioneers on the limits of human possibility of modern times but after his death a collective amnesia has descended and his is now almost forgotten.

Lilly was a generation (or more) ahead of his time. He is almost single-handedly responsible for the great interest in dolphins (which led to the Marine Mammal Protection Act in the USA and helped to found the animal rights movement). In 1958 he noted that the brains of elephants and cetaceans were larger than ours, that we should not abuse them and that it was one our most important projects to communicate with them. He invented sensory isolation tanks (at NIMH in 1954) and used them extensively with and without powerful psychoactive drugs at a time when it was thought that either the brain would shut down or one would go insane if external stimuli were eliminated.

He created methods for implanting electrodes in mammal brains and was planning to do it to himself. He was one of the first to make serious use of computers in bioscience research and created the hardware and software to make the first attempts to communicate with dolphins. He self experimented with dangerous physiological investigations in high altitude medicine for the military during WW2, took LSD with dolphins and movie stars, submitted himself to the rigors of Arica training, and taught classes at Esalen.

He was the first one to investigate the bizarre psychedelic ketamine, and his results (published in the two last chapters of his book `The Scientist`) are still the best data on the dose/effect relation of any psychedelic on one person. And all this happened before most of us were born!
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Format: Paperback
Lilly was one of the greatest scientists and pioneers on the limits of human possibility of modern times but after his death a collective amnesia has descended and his is now almost forgotten.

Lilly was a generation (or more) ahead of his time. He is almost single-handedly responsible for the great interest in dolphins (which led to the Marine Mammal Protection Act in the USA and helped to found the animal rights movement). In 1958 he noted that the brains of elephants and cetaceans were larger than ours, that we should not abuse them and that it was one our most important projects to communicate with them. He invented sensory isolation tanks (at NIMH in 1954) and used them extensively with and without powerful psychoactive drugs at a time when it was thought that either the brain would shut down or one would go insane if external stimuli were eliminated.

He created methods for implanting electrodes in mammal brains and was planning to do it to himself. He was one of the first to make serious use of computers in bioscience research and created the hardware and software to make the first attempts to communicate with dolphins. He self experimented with dangerous physiological investigations in high altitude medicine for the military during WW2, took LSD with dolphins and movie stars, submitted himself to the rigors of Arica training, and taught classes at Esalen.

He was the first one to investigate the bizarre psychedelic ketamine, and his results (published in the two last chapters of his book `The Scientist`) are still the best data on the dose/effect relation of any psychedelic on one person. And all this happened before most of us were born!

He had courage, honesty and integrity that is rare anywhere and almost nonexistent in science.
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