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The Profligate Son: Or, a True Story of Family Conflict, Fashionable Vice, and Financial Ruin in Regency England by [Phillips, Nicola]
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The Profligate Son: Or, a True Story of Family Conflict, Fashionable Vice, and Financial Ruin in Regency England Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Length: 361 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

A tale of juvenile folly turning into serious crime is afforded by Nicola Phillips's splendid The Profligate Son ... which charts the boy's chosen path to its sordid and inevitable end and in the process makes an age come wonderfully alive. (The Wall Street Journal)

Nicola Phillips tells this colourful tale well, but she also takes the opportunity at various points to describe the context in which the Jacksons moved. There is much to be learned in this book about the duties that a father was thought to owe to a son and vice versa; about the workings of the law, particularly in relation to debtors; about the process of transportation; and about the government of a colony in its earliest days. It is the work of an historian with a sure-footed knowledge of the period, and one who understands the value of archival research. (Leslie Mitchell, English Historical Review)

The engine of this book is its author's empathy, but Phillips also has an eye for detail ... There is so much to admire here ... Phillips is an excellent historian. (Literary Review)

It's a very sad story: Phillips tells it impeccably, in racy parts interspersed with compelling accounts of daily life in debtors prisons; she evokes and explains the illusionary and illusory nature of credit. She writes brilliantly about the high roller's descent into low life; about how society looked both ways, to money and to morals (how familiar is that?); about the nuances of fraud, forgery and great expectations. (Clare Brant, Times Higher Education)

A white-knuckle ride into the abyss of the Regency Underworld. (Cotswold Life)

This book is a cautionary tale of absorbing and unremitting decadence, criminal and otherwise... It is the work of an historian with a sure-footed knowledge of the period, and one who understands the value of archival research. (The English Historical Review, Leslie Mitchell)

About the Author

Nicola Phillips is an expert in gender history and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Politics at Kingston University. Her first book was on women in business from 1700 to 1850, and her research focuses on eighteenth-century gender, work, family conflict, and criminal and civil law. Nicola is also an advocate of public history. A co-founder of Kingston University's Centre for the Historical Record, she is also a member of the National Archives User Advisory Group and the Historical Association's Public History Committee, and has acted as a historical consultant for the National Trust, the Royal Mail, and Addidi Wealth Ltd. She has also contributed to radio and TV programmes on gender history.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6299 KB
  • Print Length: 361 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (24 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00FGYEL0K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #585,213 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By Keen Reader TOP 100 REVIEWER on 18 July 2016
Format: Paperback
This book was referred to when I read another book recently, (An Infamous Mistress, by Joanne Major and Sarah Murden). It sounded most intriguing, so I made a point of looking it out. It is an absolutely wonderful read, hugely interesting, and extremely tragic as a tale of social and familial history of the eighteenth century. While a non-fiction book, the story that unfolds herein is utterly engrossing, and highly engaging, and is written in a most informative and enlightening way.

The profligate son was William Jackson, the dearly loved and only son of William Collins Jackson and his wife Jane. Born in 1791 in India, William and his mother had returned to England while his father continued in his role as an East India man. But in 1798, Mr Jackson made an apparent error in his dealings with one of the local leaders, and the Company recalled him to England. In 1803 Jackson was acquitted of all the charges by the Court of Directors, but Jackson felt that his reputation had suffered. While a wealthy man by the standards of the time, his character had been impugned, and the remainder of his life was spent trying to live up to the standards that he imposed on himself, and on his family, with tragic consequences for his son.

Striving to give his son the best possible education for the life of a gentleman’s son, and a gentleman himself, Jackson placed William with highly recommended educational institutions, but William seemed determined to ruin every chance he was given, and the chances for a good education grew slimmer with every discouragement. By the age of twenty, William was already the despair of his father, but Jackson was still grimly determined to try and make William learn the lessons he felt he needed to.
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By Keen Reader TOP 100 REVIEWER on 18 July 2016
Format: Hardcover
This book was referred to when I read another book recently, (An Infamous Mistress, by Joanne Major and Sarah Murden). It sounded most intriguing, so I made a point of looking it out. It is an absolutely wonderful read, hugely interesting, and extremely tragic as a tale of social and familial history of the eighteenth century. While a non-fiction book, the story that unfolds herein is utterly engrossing, and highly engaging, and is written in a most informative and enlightening way.

The profligate son was William Jackson, the dearly loved and only son of William Collins Jackson and his wife Jane. Born in 1791 in India, William and his mother had returned to England while his father continued in his role as an East India man. But in 1798, Mr Jackson made an apparent error in his dealings with one of the local leaders, and the Company recalled him to England. In 1803 Jackson was acquitted of all the charges by the Court of Directors, but Jackson felt that his reputation had suffered. While a wealthy man by the standards of the time, his character had been impugned, and the remainder of his life was spent trying to live up to the standards that he imposed on himself, and on his family, with tragic consequences for his son.

Striving to give his son the best possible education for the life of a gentleman’s son, and a gentleman himself, Jackson placed William with highly recommended educational institutions, but William seemed determined to ruin every chance he was given, and the chances for a good education grew slimmer with every discouragement. By the age of twenty, William was already the despair of his father, but Jackson was still grimly determined to try and make William learn the lessons he felt he needed to.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By Keen Reader TOP 100 REVIEWER on 18 July 2016
Format: Hardcover
This book was referred to when I read another book recently, (An Infamous Mistress, by Joanne Major and Sarah Murden). It sounded most intriguing, so I made a point of looking it out. It is an absolutely wonderful read, hugely interesting, and extremely tragic as a tale of social and familial history of the eighteenth century. While a non-fiction book, the story that unfolds herein is utterly engrossing, and highly engaging, and is written in a most informative and enlightening way.

The profligate son was William Jackson, the dearly loved and only son of William Collins Jackson and his wife Jane. Born in 1791 in India, William and his mother had returned to England while his father continued in his role as an East India man. But in 1798, Mr Jackson made an apparent error in his dealings with one of the local leaders, and the Company recalled him to England. In 1803 Jackson was acquitted of all the charges by the Court of Directors, but Jackson felt that his reputation had suffered. While a wealthy man by the standards of the time, his character had been impugned, and the remainder of his life was spent trying to live up to the standards that he imposed on himself, and on his family, with tragic consequences for his son.

Striving to give his son the best possible education for the life of a gentleman’s son, and a gentleman himself, Jackson placed William with highly recommended educational institutions, but William seemed determined to ruin every chance he was given, and the chances for a good education grew slimmer with every discouragement. By the age of twenty, William was already the despair of his father, but Jackson was still grimly determined to try and make William learn the lessons he felt he needed to.
Read more ›
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