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The Princes in the Tower: Did Richard III Murder His Nephews, Edward V & Richard of York? Hardcover – 15 Oct 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Amberley Publishing (15 Oct. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1445619741
  • ISBN-13: 978-1445619743
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 138,684 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

‘Wilkinson investigates the prime suspects, asks whether they might have survived & presents her own theory about what really happened’ (All About History) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Josephine Wilkinson is an author and historian. She received a First from the University of Newcastle where she also read for her PhD. She has received British Academy research funding and has been scholar-in-residence at St Deiniol's Library, Britain's only residential library founded by the great Victorian statesman, William Gladstone She now lives in York, Richard III's favourite city.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book is in the format of a series of short essays, covering the main personalities of the drama. The writing style is easy and the book flows very well. The only thing I found a little disappointing is the fact that Wilkinson describes in detail the various theories surrounding the princes in the tower (interesting in themselves)but her own conclusion is rushed into a page or two. This aside, a very good representation of the mystery.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The reason that I have given this narrative 3 stars is simply that, on a subject that is highly controversial, this book simply isn't. It's bland.
Yes it goes through all that's probable/possible/likely etc., but it doesn't (and cannot) answer the question stated in the title anymore than anyone else can. It's main saving grace is that it doesn't make statements of 'fact' (which are not and cannot be proven) whereas some other so called historians do.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a well researched piece of historical investigation made all the more tantalising because we shall probably never know the truth but Josephine Wilkinson manages to neatly throw into serious doubt the popular myth about the disappearance of the two princes. Inevitably her research throws up a myriad of names which can be a little confusing as one progresses through the pages. It is a good read and thought provoking.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
But the author gives some plausible ideas of what could have happened to the princes if they survived. She suggests several possibilities. While many still insist that they were murdered, this book is really for those who prefer to have an open mind concerning the fate of the Princes in the Tower. Bear in mind that in those days, there were no cameras, CTTVs,r TVs or computers.yet even today, people have disappeared without trace but could still be living somewhere else with a name change etc so to suggest that the princes must have died because they were not seen again doesn't mean they did not survive.
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Format: Hardcover
Surrounding all the hoo haa about Richard III being found in a Leicestershire car park I found myself drawn to this book as, from what I remember of my history lessons, Richard III was the bad man who killed off his nephews. Wondering if any new light has been shed on this case I took a chance with Wilkinson's book and indeed did learn more.

As other reviewers have noted we do not find out what really happened to the boys, but the process of uncovering chronological time lines to understand who was where and doing what at the time was very interesting, as was the fact that contemporary accounts all differ from each other in their explanation of what happened to the young Edward V and his brother The Duke of York.

Were they murdered, were they spirited away abroad, were they drowned, buried under the steps in the Tower of London or were they indeed smothered in their beds?

Being sentimental I would like to think that the path was made clear for Henry VIII to become king and the boys were sent away with the permission of their Mother, but the fact That Richard III did not appear to defend himself from the rumors that he had killed them was very interesting (implicating??).

This book is quite easy to read but could have done with some family trees and perhaps an injection of other pictures to aid the readers understanding. I had to get out a British History book to read alongside this one as I started to become confused as to who was the father of who, who was married to who and what the family links were.

Wilkinson kind of takes it for granted that the reader is well versed in Tudor History but the many mentions of copious family members and even contemporary various other persons was hard to get your head around.
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Format: Paperback
Brilliant Book. Dr Josephine she did what very few writers did. She presents all available confirmed (in her opinion) information and rumours related to this mystery. She analyses the information and remains objective. Of course she express her point of view in the end based on this information without discarding the rumours.
A must book to read and have in your collection.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very thorough investigation into the disappearance of the princes. Still not conclusive though. Will we ever know the truth? Probably not.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wilkinson admits that in writing the second part of her biography of Richard III, she became too bogged down with the whole 'princes in the tower' enigma and so chose to pull some of her thoughts together in this book.

Each chapter looks at a different suspect of aspect of the mystery. I've given only three stars not because there was anything particularly wrong with what was written, I think I just expected that Wilkinson had uncovered something new or had a stunning new theory to present! The downside with reading non-fiction books on the Kindle can be that you get to about 75% in and it suddenly ends with the rest of the book being footnotes, bibliography etc.

It is a good and lucid look at the facts and the arguments, so not a bad book, just nothing new and didn't meet the expectations I had formed.
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