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Primary Colours CD

3.9 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (4 May 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: XL
  • ASIN: B0021H5FN2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,586 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

BBC Review

When The Horrors first arrived on the cover of NME a couple of years ago, being bugled as the best band in the country, various hackles were raised and naturally the inbuilt cynicism of your everyday Enemy fan smelt dubious hype. They looked amazing, and in the 100 or so seconds of the single Sheena Is A Parasite, sounded pretty good too. However, their black clad eyes and tendency to smear audiences in soot didn't suggest a long term career plan, and within a few moments of their not-that-bad debut album Strange House being released, they had been written off as some sort of novelty that it wouldn't been a shock if there were collectible Japanese action figures made of them. Primary Colours, then, is likely to be a bit of a shock to those expecting further Screaming Lord Sutch hysterics.

Oh yes. A colossal sounding amalgam of incredible influences - Neu!, My Bloody Valentine, Mary Chain, DAF, Acid house, Loop, krautrock, even Kitchens Of Distinction etc, broadening their palette enough as so not to get confused with The View. Within minutes of the first single - the eight minute Sea Within A Sea - being made available on their site, the net was vibrating with nothing but Blimey!s, and various words were in the process of being eaten.

Curiously for an album apparently made in almost total darkness, it sounds at its best in the sunshine. Like a baby Kevin Shields, Josh Third's guitar weaves undulating waves beneath opener Mirror's Image - this isn't anything, this is a full-on rebirth - the swooning vastness of guitar and vintage organs on Three Decades; I Only Think Of You is the Velvet Underground you can sunbathe to; If we lived in a world where Jesus & Mary Chain once had Top Ten hits, then there's no reason why Who Can Say with its Joe Meek-ian organs and girl-group homage, can't repeat such a thing.

There's barely a bad moment here. You are left more in awe that A: this is The Horrors and B: it stands tall above so many other things. Genuinely, really, very, very good indeed, people. Hell, even an album of the year. --Ian Wade

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I have to admit that, back in 2006, when the Horrors first emerged I was, pardon the pun, horrified. Their old sound was generic and they stank of the style over substance nonsense that the NME had come to adore; nothing but a product of the hype machine. Fast forward to 2009, however, and things are completely different. The "quirky" magazine-friendly image is still there, but this time the band have remembered to write some decent tunes too. They also decided that, rather than copy the bands they idolised, they could take the bits they liked, mix them together with other bits and make something new and exciting. Large elements of Primary Colours sound a bit like other bands, but it's safe to say that none of those bands ever made a sound quite like this. The Jesus and Mary Chain, Joy Division, Siousxie and The Banshess, MBV, Can, Neu!: it's all here, but it's never in doubt that you're listening to any other band. With an array of experimental sounds and plenty of feedback throw in to the equation, it's clear when listening that great care has gone into every track. Each song rewards repeated listens and all of them contain plenty to like beyond the obvious. Credit here surely goes to the production team, who, by all accounts, helped to bring out the best in the band creatively as well as adding their own particular talents to proceedings. That the album shares 4 production credits (one of which being the band themselves) is, I feel, one of the reasons that each track sounds distinctive, and there are many different sounds explored throughout the course of the ten tracks. Because of this, the album sounds great as a whole; something that is sadly lacking with a lot of releases lately.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
Tis not hype that caused a sizeable proportion of crtics to declare this 'Album of the Year', twas talent. The Horrors have managed to create what the Doves have always tried to - an aural landscape that sucks you in and lets you float in it for forty-five minutes. No two tracks are the same and each one gels into the next perfectly. It takes a lot for a crusty 47 year old grandfather to get excited but this album did it with out any effort what so ever. Buy and enjoy.
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Format: Audio CD
Rarely do I get an album and then play it all the way through several times a day for days on end, which is what I'm doing with The Horrors follow-up album. From start to finish this is a top album. Yes the influences are there for everyone to see, but so what? I like the fact that there's a song which sounds a bit like David Gedge from the Wedding Present singing for My Bloody Valentine (Three Decades) and that the final song (Sea Within A Sea) has a keyboard style influenced by 70's German music. These two tracks are my favourites on the entire album. There are traces of the old Horrors style left, most noticeably on New Ice Age, but the guys should be congratulated for not producing Strange House MKII. Unless someone else comes up with an absolute stormer of a record in the next three months, I can see Primary Colours easily being my album of the year.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Before the superb 'Primary Colours' The Horrors were the biggest enigma in music. There was clearly talent there but they wasted it by playing naff Garage Rock and trying too hard to be goth. But they stepped up to the plate here and sound like a modern day My Bloody Valentine with deep voiced Faris Badwan in charge.

'Mirrors Image' is a wash of loud guitars and powerful bass. 'Who Can Say' is like a modern day Jesus and The Mary Chain. While stand out 'Scarlet Fields' is dreamy and bouncy whilst keeping its gloominess, as does the tile-track which sounds like something out of an 80s light hearted vampire film. 'Sea Within A Sea' is the highlight, starting like a distant Joy Division before bursting into pure krautrock-esque synths.

Their funny lads so its a suprise at how visceral this is. If you want something lighter look at the equally great 'Skying'.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Few people have ever been in doubt that the Horrors have cracking record collections, a collective eye for natty threads, as well as coercible hairdressers. It was a pity therefore that they seemed intent on strangling their musical endeavours with a selection of broken pedals and their own hype. They were black and white, style over substance.

That was then. Primary Colours now shifts their monochrome focus into a more vivid arena. Little has been cut however from Strange House, but plenty has been added. Notably, it's in with intelligible organ, Joy Division homages and My Bloody Valentine drone. Tellingly, it's out with schlock-shock screaming, faux-goth and stubborn resistance to include a tune. Primary Colours contorts from curiosity into contender really rather quickly.

As Strange House hinted at surf-punk, Primary Colours hints at spectral girl groups, distorted, of course on `Who Can Say'. `I Can't Control Myself' has persuaded Spiritualized's `Come Together' to guest on its own re-imagining. Elsewhere it's Bauhaus grooming a fledgling Cramps, the title track is Jesus & Mary Chain as fronted by the sombre ghost of Ian Curtis. 7-minute closer, `Sea Within A Sea', is a joyously optimistic show of synth, which, if a little light in itself, is a krautrock paean to triumph in adversity, a tacit statement of self-assured self, a told-you-so to the naysayers.

Its knockers will still cite originality as a major downfall, but there is an art to pastiche, an art in which the Horrors have become proficient. Their former incarnation as skinny clotheshorses has allowed them to evolve and run confident streaks across the record like a rainbow breaking out of a storm, spreading the primary colours of Loveless, Pyschocandy and In The Flat Field across their canvas. Pastiche with power, it's as easy as one-two-three: red, green, ... and as blue as White Lies.
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