Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£0.00
Free with your Audible trial
Free with Audible trial
£0.00
Buy with 1-Click
£11.65

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
When I bought this book I was slightly sceptical; after all, how could one person (Steve Jobs) be THAT good at presenting that a whole book could be dedicated to him?

As I read on I realised that the style of Steve Jobs is the key here. He uses simple words, simple pictures and powerful stories to convey his messages. Even a technical analysis of his presentations (lexical density, hard words, Fog index etc.) reveals that his messages are surprisingly simple yet paint the most powerful pictures.

Throughout the book there are references to threes; three bears, three elements of a good story and so on. And as if to follow suit, the book is also divided into three sections:

1. Create the story
2. Deliver the experience
3. Refine and rehearse.

Steve Jobs is a legendary presenter. Not many people would launch a world-beating computer (Macintosh) by quoting Bob Dylan! Yet Steve's simple, almost overly simple, presentations do exactly what they are supposed to do; they hold the audience and convey the message.

This book is full of technical support notes regarding the use of language, the effectiveness (or otherwise) of bullet points and the best way to construct a presentation. There are even a range of tips of getting the best from PowerPoint and a number of excellent insights into the way other legendary individuals communicate.

This is a great little book for anyone who has to, professionally or occasionally presents and conveys messages and offers so many simple and common sense ideas that it's a wonder why we have to sit through so many poor presentations.

Read this book and make your next presentation so much more memorable for all the RIGHT reasons.
Comment 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Steve Jobs is considered one of the best presenters of all time. He walks on to the stage in blue jeans and a poloneck and just chats with the audience, effortlessly.

Jobs may have talent, but it doesn't come without effort. And he does everything right. If you read all the books on presentation design, Reynolds, Duarte, Atkins, Kawasaki, Williams, etc., you will find that Jobs is the case study that does it all.

He creates the story, the unforgettable headline; "Today Apple reinvents the phone", "The world's thinnest notebook", "One thousand songs in your pocket", the passion statement, the metaphors and analogies, he develops demonstrations and supporting slides.

More than anything, he answers the essential question: Why does it matter? Why does the audience want to know. Where does it hurt? And he answers without clutter, simplifies to emphasize.

Most of his slides, those that aren't pictures, are just a few words, in fact most of them would pass Reynolds' 'max six words on a slide' rule. The screen never competes with what he says, only supports and elevates.

Jobs might look like he is just ad libbing on stage, but the truth is he spends hours and days rehearsing. Every word and every gesture is scripted and refined and rehearsed and rehearsed and rehearsed. That is what it takes to be perfectly relaxed, just chatting with the audience.

His Macworld keynotes, which is where he really excels, are long, an hour, some times longer. That is why he 'chunks' his presentation. Every few minutes, ten at the most, something new happens, a demo, a guest, a video, something to re-engage the audience.
Read more ›
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
And I read them all!
Over the years I have read many hundreds of books on public speaking. Lots of them regurgitate the same old, same old - but this is different.
Steve Jobs of Apple has reinvented the genre of public speaking as pitch. People queue up all night to get into one of his talks. What can we learn from him? A lot! The author is not just a Jobs fan but an expert public speaking coach.
Granted there's some repetition half way through and the Jobs love is a bit pukey at times, but it's worth hanging in there through that.
The book is NOT for first time speakers or nervey types wanting to get a little better, but if you are a speaker and have some experience of public speaking and want to learn how to be even more persuasive, no - wildly effective - get this book. I speak in front of hundreds of people everty week and have done so for years, and can't wait till tomorrow to implement some of the advice here.
1 Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I like the content of the book, but for a book about presentation skills I am quite surprised why it has such poor typography. The page spread, the often far too big number of different fonts on a single page, the pages generally far to full, the gimmicky 'frames'. This is a collection of typographical sins. Maybe one can't expect any better from a book layout company who call themselves in the imprint of this book 'interior designers'? It looks as if it was designed by somebody on a screen who never learnt what can be printed on real paper and what can't. What a shame, this book deserved better.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Jeremy Walton TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Sept. 2013
Format: Hardcover
I picked this book up in Changi airport a few years ago whilst waiting for a flight back to the UK, and was sufficiently interested by the parts I read to get hold of my own copy. Whilst reading it over the past day or two, I began to wonder if I'd've done better to finish it off whilst standing in the airport. It really only takes a few hours to read, but the amount of information it contains could be ingested in a much shorter period of time.

As the title suggests, the book uses examples from Steve Jobs's product presentations to suggest ways in which the reader's talks could be improved. I've been interested in the area of presentation skills for a while, and have already compiled my own list of do's and don'ts (some of which occurred to me while watching video of Jobs's talks), so I mainly found this book useful as reinforcing what (I think) I already knew about effective presentations: they focus on answering a single question, they're delivered with enthusiasm, and they've been thoroughly rehearsed. All of these things - and a few others - are described here, and are nicely illustrated with some passages from a few of Jobs's talks. Chief among these is his 2007 presentation which introduced the iPhone, to which the author returns again and again - for example - he uses it to directly demonstrate why a speaker who has a conversational, seemingly-spontaneous style (like Jobs) is better at engaging with the audience than one who reads from cue cards (like the CEO of Cingular, who was brought onstage to talk about the network for the iPhone).

This is all good stuff since - as the author points out - all the Jobs talks he refers to in the book are handily available on YouTube for our delectation and education.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse