Buy Used
£2.17
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Pound of Paper: Confessions of a Book Addict Paperback – 1 Mar 2004

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 1 Mar 2004
"Please retry"
£0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (Transworld Publishers a division of the Random House Group); New edition edition (1 Mar. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553814427
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553814422
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,234,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

John Baxter is a novelist and broadcaster, as well as being a highly acclaimed film critic and film biographer. His subjects have included Fellini, Spielberg and Kubrick. He is currently completing a biography of Robert De Niro for HarperCollins.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 9 July 2004
This was something of an anticlimax. Baxter's accounts of tracking down books and authors are good, sometimes very good, but his writing too often degenerates into shapeless lists of minor authors, book titles and film titles: "...Iris Owens ('Harriett Daimler') and Austryn Wainhouse ('Pieralessandro Casavini') both had later careers under their own names, as did Terry Southern, co-author of Candy, and Chester Himes, the African-American writer of Pinktoes. Canadian poet John Glassco already had a minor reputation when he agreed to complete Aubrey Beardsley's Under the Hill for Olympia..." And so on. I suppose this is inevitable in a book by a film critic and book collector, but it becomes tedious after a while.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The life story (bits of) of an Australian book collector - chunky, but with not many words per line - doesn't sound much fun, right? Wrong. Take him on libraries: 'most librarians don't like books any more than butchers like lamb chops', and furthermore 'collectors abominate lending libraries', a tad unfairly since it was the library of the Junee Railway Institute that 'usefully introduced [him] to the mediocrity of most literature.' An early science fiction buff, he devours the stuff as well as fetishising it. But it's the Ozzy backdrop that lends this obsessive's life its exoticism for us cossetted Europeans - a chocolate box for the bookish
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I've been on a kick lately where I'm reading lots of "books about books," and/or "books about reading," which led me to pick this one up. The subtitle "Confessions of a Book Addict" is an apt one, as this is essentially a rambling memoir whose only unifying theme is the author's love of books. And while it does delve into the rarefied (and often grubby) realm of book collecting and collectors, that's not really the focus. Actually, other than the author's lifelong love of books and telling a good story, there is no real focus -- which really isn't a problem, since Baxter is able to maintain the breezy entertaining cadence of born raconteurs. And although like many raconteurs, his stories sometimes veer in unexpected directions and digressions, they are rarely unwelcome ones.

Baxter (a sometime fiction writer and noted film biographer) begins at the beginning, outlining his drab and dreary Australian childhood. Like so many bored kids, he found an outlet in books, films, and eventually pulp magazines. As a teen and young man, he grew up something of a science-fiction fanboy, joining the inner circle of Australia's minuscule sci-fi community, while working a dreary job for the national railroads. After some initial forays into writing (including bios for a porn mag), he heads to London, where his love affair with books turns him from a consumer into a collector. The reader tags along with Baxter as he hobnobs with the weird-but-true characters of the used book trade in London, before he heads off to Roanoke, Virginia to teach, then Los Angeles, and eventually Paris, accumulating and then shedding books along the way.

One has to accept that a lot of the authors and personalities he encounters and discusses aren't exactly household names -- especially for American readers.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Some amusing anecdotes for book lovers but also too much rather tedious background around it, so I gave up around half way through.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback