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Postcards From Nam by [Duong, Uyen Nicole]
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Postcards From Nam Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Length: 115 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

About the Author

Uyen Nicole Duong earned a B.S. in journalism/communication from Southern Illinois University, a J.D. from the University of Houston, and an LLM from Harvard Law School. She worked for ten years as a law professor in Colorado before moving to Houston, Texas, where she lives today. Postcards from Nam is the third installment of a three-book series on the end of the Vietnam War and the settlement experience of Vietnamese Americans in the United States. The first two books are Mimi and Her Mirror and Daughters of the River Huong, the latter of which has been used in Vietnamese studies courses at Yale University and San Jose State. In addition to writing fiction, she pursues L’Art Brut (raw art).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1246 KB
  • Print Length: 115 pages
  • Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (15 Aug. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00546IDP4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #197,303 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Although this novella was only 90 pages long, it delivered quite a punch. With a slow start describing Mimi's life as a lawyer in America, the book opens out to describe her past as a child in Saigon before it fell to the Communist North, and the difficulties of escaping from the country.

Mimi's escape was traumatic enough and she was devastated to leave a much beloved grandmother. But many were even less fortunate and suffered as the 'boat people' that we heard so much about on the news at the time. With storms, pirates and often refusal on their eventual arrival, this was an hugely risky way to escape.

The postcards of the title arrived from Thailand without return addresses, signed 'Nam'. At first Mimi could not fathom who they could be from, but when she finally realises the identity of Nam she is forced to remember suppressed memories from her childhood.

Mimi interviews several survivors, to relate a piece of history that has probably slipped from many memories.
Although this is the third of a trilogy, I did not feel I should have read the other books first. Having read Postcards From Nam, however, I would very much like to read the previous 2 books.
Written in a slightly awkward style, I would still recommend this for its powerful content.
For an alternative read based in Vietnam, I would also suggest The Man From Saigon by Marti Leimbach.
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By Lincs Reader TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 31 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I chose this book from the Amazon Vine newsletter, the premise of the story really appealed to me, and I've not read many novels set around Vietnam before - so was interested to learn a little more. This is a novella really at just 100 pages long, but every one of the pages contain words that really touch the heart.

Mimi is a succesful lawyer based in America, she is a Vietnamese immigrant who has americanised both her name and her lifestyle. Mimi's family were lucky enough to be able to leave their home in South Vietnam just before the North took over. Other family members and friends were not so lucky though, and Mimi has distanced herself from the memories of her past. Then, out of the blue, postcards begin to arrive. Beautifully, hand drawn postcards that are personal to Mimi, and to her past. Who is sending them, and why? What do they mean?

After speaking with her family, it becomes clear to Mimi that these cards are being sent by Nam. Nam was a childhood neighbour back in Vietnam and Mimi has heard nothing from him for years. Determined to find out more about the cards and about Nam, Mimi tracks down refugees and learns through them, of Nam's ordeals over the past years. He has suffered dreadfully, yet still he remembers her.

There are some haunting passages in this short novel, the terrors suffered by Nam over the years are harsh, yet his love for Mimi never dies and his art work iives on.

This is a beautifully crafted story.
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By D. Pearce VINE VOICE on 16 May 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is more of a Novella than a novel, but it doesn't suffer from this brevity. Many novels outstay their welcome but this one knows when to stop before leaving the reader wanting less! The postcards of the title are sent to a lawyer called Mimi who has settled in America after escaping from the Vietnam of her childhood. They bring back memories of that time and each one is simply signed 'Nam'. Clearly Nam knows her but she doesn't know Nam. Mimi goes on a search for him, but will she like what she finds? This is best read in one sitting and will reward the reader with a deceptively emotional story.
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By HJK VINE VOICE on 17 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a Novella in less than 100 pages and is a work of fiction.

Mimi (Mi Chau originally from Saigon) starts to get Postcards from Nam in Thailand in 1988.

Mimi at first cannot remember Nam - then memories slowly start to surface and flood back - memories that have been suppressed for many years and it takes her a decade to find out what became of Nam and looks at the tragic events in their lives from the end of the war in Vietnam.

The Novella leaves you wanting to know so much more and yet it does convey very much in its short format.

This book leaves you wanting to learn more about the history of Vietnam. The author has written 2 other books both recently published in March 2011: Daughters of the River Huang & Mimi and her Mirror. I think this is the same Mimi and if so would like to read this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
really disappointed. the history is piecemeal and you don't really learn anything. Mimi doesn't have many redeemable features so there is no reason to become emotionally involved. Too short to be good and Mimi is irritating
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful, beautifully written and sensitive book which gives an insight into the travails of the Vietnamese people who were
transported to the United States after the fall of Saigon in 1975.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At times the book became very slow but overall a good story line kept my attention and made me empathise with the characters and their situations. The folly of war and how it changes lives of those who live through it was well demonstrated. Would highly recommend
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By S Finnerty TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a short novel of appoximatly ninety pages and is the third installment of a trilogy. It explores some meaningful issues from the Vietnamese point of view after the US-Vietnam War giving voice to the Vietnamese Boat People and the Vietnamese immigrant communities. This is a short novel and further padded out by a ten page postscript written by a friend of the author who attempts to interpret its meaning praises the author's creativity talent. Not a bad read but not one I would go back to and came away wanting to know so much more detail than what was delived about the characters and how they developed. Maybe a forth novel in the series will deliver this.
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