£12.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Portuguese:A Modern H... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Portuguese:A Modern History Paperback – 30 Jan 2011

4.4 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.99
£5.97 £9.77
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Portuguese:A Modern History
  • +
  • Conquerors: How Portugal seized the Indian Ocean and forged the First Global Empire
Total price: £32.99
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Signal Books Ltd (30 Jan. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904955770
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904955771
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 115,818 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Hatton clearly loves Portugal and has written an engaging, often delightful history.' --Publishers Weekly

'Barry Hatton has written a lively and rigorous account of how a nation that is so often overlooked has come through disaster, dictatorship, revolution and economic mismanagement. . . The Portuguese is a must-read for first-timers wanting to know more about the country, but it is also a constant delight for those already well-versed in a fascinating nation.' --Iberosphere

About the Author

Barry Hatton has been a foreign correspondent in Lisbon for more than twenty years. He has previously co-authored a biography, in Portuguese, of Portugal's first ever woman prime minister, Maria de Lourdes Pintasilgo.


Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I see from the image of the book that the subtitle has been changed from Portrait of a Nation, which is a more accurate description, to A Modern History in my edition (which I found meaningless). The subject matter is partly history, partly personal reminiscence and partly about Portugal after its accession to the European Union. Mr Hatton addresses questions which constantly assail us expatriates. How has the leader of European exploration and imperial expansion fallen on hard times? Why do the forcados challenge bulls in the bullring? How did a democracy emerge from the forty years of Salazarism? Why is Portugal so poorly developed in comparison with Spain? How is Portugal really doing in the modern rat-race? Where are the success stories in modern Portugal? The book emerges as Portugal occupies centre-stage in Europe for the first time since the Carnation Revolution of 1974, but this time for financial reasons.

The answers are characteristically upbeat as the author explicitly disparages the Portuguese national habit of self-deprecation. His daughter pleaded with him not to portray the Portuguese as labregos, or bumpkins, and he follows her wishes admirably. His chapters on fado, on the eating customs of the Portuguese, and the Portuguese love of idiosyncrasy and individualism, even anarchy, provided this reader with fresh insight. In his quarter of a century in Portugal, Mr Hatton has come to know and to love the Portuguese character, and he conveys his enthusiasm with clarity. He admires their skill at improvisation, their courage, their love of good living. In an interview, he allows some frustrations to emerge such as the Portuguese lack of respect for punctuality, their disorderly parking and their parochialism both geographic and professional.
Read more ›
2 Comments 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I lived in Portugal for 8 years, back in the late 80s and through to the mid-90s, so I know a bit about the country, the politics, and the people. Barry Hatton has done a wonderful job of getting under the skin of the place, and this has to be the best book in modern times about one of Europe's least known countries.

The author writes very entertainingly about Portugal's history, gastronomy, economy and culture, and he manages to find wonderfully apposite quotes and personal accounts to illustrate his points. If I were going on holiday to Portugal, or thinking of re-locating there, this book would be my first choice to get an in-depth understanding before I set out. But it's well worth reading on its own account, just for the quality of writing and entertainment value. Highly recommended!
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Pluses: This is a captivating work with noble intentions expressed in the Preface, of showing appreciation for the Portuguese people and raising Portugal's profile. Equally captivating is the lively journalistic style in which the book is written. Yet another plus is the good variety of topics, amongst them a chapter on 'Fado Music and the Soul of Portugal' and one on 'The Importance of Eating Well'.
Minuses: You may be rather disappointed if, based on the book title, you were expecting a History. As the author honestly explains in the Preface, some of the evidence is 'anecdotal' and he hopes 'to provide a view'; he is not claiming he has written a history. This book is a very interesting but personal view. It is fundamentally a subjective account.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Interesting view of Portugal and the Portuguese. This book makes a good attempt to relate Portugal's history to contemporary life in Portugal. Modern day anecdotes don't quite help in understanding current thinking amongst Portuguese. Too much is made of regional differences, rivalries and jealousies when compared to say Spain, for example, Portugal is reasonably coherent in terms of culture. After all this is a small country with a common language for 1000 years. Fado, for example, was originally an urban blues originating in Lisbon. Today it is sung throughout the country in urban and rural environments with a growing number of fado venues in Porto and many well known singers from the rural Alentejo. Although Lisbon is still the centre for fado music, many contemporary singers (fadistas) originate outside the capital. Even in football you will find many Benfica supporters in Porto even though Porto is by far the most successful team of the last 2 decades.
Some factual errors and lack of understanding are surprising given that the author has lived in Portugal for many years, is married to a Portuguese and has children who considered themselves Portuguese. E.G. it is stated that the great literary figure of the first half of the 20th century Fernando Pessoa wrote under 3 pseudonyms, when in fact he wrote under at least 9 heteronyms and some say as many as 20. Pseudonyms are false names to hide the identity of an author. Heteronyms are written as if the author was another person. Fernando Pessoa invented very different personages and wrote as if he was that person. Most of the heteronyms were Portuguese but some were British and wrote in English.
Read more ›
1 Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback