£14.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Portrait of the Artist as... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, A (Penguin Drop Caps) Hardcover – 6 Jun 2013

4.0 out of 5 stars 58 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 6 Jun 2013
£14.99
£7.28 £10.78
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£21.66
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, A (Penguin Drop Caps)
  • +
  • Ulysses (Everyman's Library Classics)
  • +
  • Dubliners (Everyman's Library Classics)
Total price: £37.37
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: PENGUIN BOOKS - USA; Reprint edition (6 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143124315
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143124313
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.5 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 519,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Winner of the 2012 Fifty Books/Fifty Covers show, organized by Design Observer in association with AIGA and Designers & Books
Winner of the 2014 Type Directors Club Communication Design Award
Praise for Penguin Drop Caps:
"[Penguin Drop Caps] convey a sense of nostalgia for the tactility and aesthetic power of a physical book and for a centuries-old tradition of beautiful lettering."
"Fast Company"
Vibrant, minimalist new typographic covers . Bonus points for the heartening gender balance of the initial selections.
Maria Popova, "Brain Pickings"
"The Penguin Drop Caps series is a great example of the power of design. Why buy these particular classics when there are less expensive, even free editions of "Great Expectations"? Because they re beautiful objects. Paul Buckley and Jessica Hische s fresh approach to the literary classics reduces the design down to typography and color. Each cover is foil-stamped with a cleverly illustrated letterform that reveals an element of the story. Jane Austen s A ("Pride and Prejudice") is formed by opulent peacock feathers and Charlotte Bronte s B ("Jane Eyre") is surrounded by flames. The complete set forms a rainbow spectrum prettier than anything else on your bookshelf."
Rex Bonomelli, "The New York Times"
"Drool-inducing."
"Flavorwire"
"Classic reads in stunning covers your book club will be dying."
"Redbook""

Book Description

A highly autobiographical tale of the growth of a young man's mind, and his striving for independence. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Having read no Joyce before other than 'The Dubliners', which underwhelmed me slightly, I was not really expecting to enjoy 'Portrait...' madly. However, I was pleasantly surprised, and if it was a little hard going at times, the passages where Joyce really turns it on make 'Portrait' a decidedly worthwhile read.

The autobiographical novel consists of a number of disconnected episodes from the hero Stephen Dedalus' life, presented in chronological order. Though written in the third person, we are treated to an extremely personal account of Dedalus' late childhood, adolescence, and early manhood. He goes through several psychological phases as he comes to terms with the conflict between Catholicism and his own desires; as a young man myself (though not a Catholic), I certainly found a good deal to identify with.

Joyce's writing is strange. It is not obviously and consistently brilliant, as (for instance) Hemmingway or Fitzgerald. For pages, one feels a little bored as he describes grim Irish life with little attempt at entertainment or insight, but then suddenly he changes gear and nails you with something unsurpassably brilliant. As an example, I'll quote the last paragraph of chapter two - it's quite long, but should give you the idea.

"With a sudden movement she bowed his head and joined her lips to his and he read the meaning of her movements in her frank uplifted eyes. It was too much for him. He closed his eyes, surrendering himself to her, body and mind, conscious of nothing in the world but the dark pressure of her soflty parting lips. They pressed upon his brain as upon his lips as though they were the vehicle of a vague speech; and between them he felt an unknown and timid pressure, darker than the swoon of sin, softer than sound or odour.
Read more ›
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
SO I read this at the tender age of seventeen, and I couldn't have picked a better time to do it. This book is brim-full of wisdom, elegance, beauty, ideas and inspiration it's incomparable to anything else I've read.

We greet Stephen Dedalus in his early childhood and follow his strenuous journey from withdrawn child to a flourshing Young Man, and learn a lot about Joyce's own life, and Irish politics/religion all at the same time. The edition certainly has some nice facts footnoted at the back.

What's amazing about this novel though is the language and the masterly way Joyce handles it. In childhood the language is wonderfully childlike and innocent (and indded has some childish grammar mistakes) but this develops as Dedalus develops, and it makes us feel like we're growing up with him - a tactic wholly immersing and means the beautiful prose of the last few chapters really stands out. Furthermore, the knowledge Joyce himself shows off is delightful - philsophers and latin thrown around like two gold coins in a pit of beggars.

There is, however, a minor lull in the middle of the novel, when Dedalus enters religious camp (so to speak), and we too recieve the lengthy lectures about Hell and Eternity, which although are equally elegant in their style, can get a little tedious. But it must be remebered that that is the whole point of the novel; expressing the moments that shape a man (not matter how boring there are!).

But as a conclusion, this novel is a great intorduction to Joyce and is (in my humble opinion) a better read than his more famous Ulysses. Read this, for a wonderful insight into youth and experience, and for inspiration to become a similar young artist like Dedalus.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 2 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
"Portrait of the Artist.." is perhaps one of the more accesable of James Joyces books, and also, for me one of the most enjoyable. The actual "story" of the book, is blataly autobiographical, concerning Stephen Dedalus/James Joyce's early life, at school - first encounters with women, and the enourmous inner conflict with Religion. The story is of little consequence really.. however, you've got to admire Joyce's honesty, if this truely is autobiographical. He has the irritating habit of trying to make Dedalus/Joyce seem somehow, superior, more intelligent than his peers, without actualy ever demonstrating this superiority at all. And, I'm afraid, I couldn't relate to the Religious conflict at all.. however it is an interesting insight. What does make this unique is the language, the "stream of conciousness" style, which at times, like at the end of the fourth chapter can be awesomely beautiful. It is this quality that makes Joyce worth reading. By his close observation and use of language he is sometimes able to completely transport the reader, intoxicate the reader. There is, however, an uneasy air which hangs over the works of James Joyce, and I can't quite put my finger on it...
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd obviously heard of Joyce before reading this book, though I hadn't read any of his major works. I had high expectations though, and I was thoroughly disappointed. I found the prose confusing and hard to get along with. Not a lot happened but everything was described to such an extent that you lost interest in anything that did happen. If you're a Joyce fan, you may find it interesting to learn a little about his life, but as a stand-alone piece of work, I didn't find it enjoyable to read in the slightest.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback