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The Politics of Truth: A Diplomat's Memoir - Inside the Lies That Led to War and Betrayed My Wife's CIA Identity Hardcover – 6 Apr 2004

4.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 6 Apr 2004
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Empire Press, US; First Edition edition (6 April 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 078671378X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786713783
  • Product Dimensions: 24.3 x 16.2 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,198,353 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

While many former Bush administration officials published books airing their gripes and concerns in advance of the 2004 election, few got as personal as Joseph Wilson's The Politics of Truth. A career diplomat, Wilson found himself working for an administration that apparently leaked information revealing his wife, Valerie Plame, to be a CIA operative soon after Wilson cast doubt on Bush's claims of Iraq trying to buy uranium from Niger. When columnist Robert Novak named Plame, there was widespread speculation about who leaked the information. In The Politics of Truth, Wilson points a finger at Dick Cheney's chief-of-staff I Lewis (Scooter) Libby and national security aide Eliot Abrams although Wilson never really presents smoking gun evidence against them. There is little here that breaks new ground in terms of hard facts being revealed. Nonetheless, Wilson's account, personal and well written, maps out the human impact of the situation in ways that major newspapers never could.

Wilson's animus toward the administration is made stronger by his support of the president in the 2000 election and he held out hope that a centrist conservative approach would help America's position in the world. That scenario withered, in Wilson's mind, when the plan to invade Iraq became increasingly inevitable and, like many traditional conservatives, Wilson mourns the rise of the ideological "neo-conservatives" who shaped foreign policy. But while a true-life secret identity/betrayal story is inherently fascinating, and Wilson's indignation and scorn is powerfully delivered, there is more to recommend his book. Wilson tells of being stationed in the Persian Gulf in the days leading up to the first Gulf War, a haunting encounter with Saddam Hussein, and years of efforts to establish democracy in Africa. The Politics of Truth provides a glimpse inside the high-stakes world of international intelligence and, Joseph Wilson says, that world can be vicious. --John Moe, Amazon.com

About the Author

Joseph Wilson, a political centrist, was a career United States diplomat from 1976 to 1998. During Democratic and Republican administrations he served in various diplomatic posts throughout Africa and eventually as ambassador to Gabon. He was the acting ambassador to Baghdad when Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. In February 2002, as special envoy to Niger he investigated reports of Iraq's attempt to buy nuclear material there. In October 2003, Wilson received the Ron Ridenhour Prize for Truth-Telling from the Fertel Foundation and the Nation Institute. He lives in Washington, D.C.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.


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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I own and read books from all extremes of the current debate (or debacle, depending on your viewpoint). This has to be one of the best, along with Ron Susskind's The Price of Loyalty about O'Neill's dismissal. Why? It's extraordinarily well-written (no ghost-writer) and it's the story of a patriot and truth-teller who hated the disillusion and power games with which he was forced to come to terms. So, it's no polemic; just the slow unwinding of all kinds of pain.
He'll rank, in due course, with the Old China Hands who were dismissed the service for telling the truth in the 1940's, and maybe even with Ed Murrow. And, by the way, his anecdotes are so engaging that he's one of those people I want to be trapped in an airport lounge with ... whatever your views, don't miss.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating book. I came to it after viewing the movie 'Fair Game' and was simply intrigued. Mr Wilson provides a very thorough- and in the circumstances a relatively objective account of how his family's reputation was besmirched by that family's government, specifically the Bush administration. These are not the allegations of someone who is anti government or anti USA but an American Ambassador and his CIA staffer wife. In fact 'allegations' is the wrong word as it suggests that there is much debate about what happened. There isn't. But it is not for me to reveal how Wilson proves his case. But prove it he does.
As he fairly points out and as it is explored in the movie the outing of his wife as an agent put many people at risk throughout the world.
The book is an important work and a lesson to us all about how governments can behave abominably and criminally against their own citizens.
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Format: Hardcover
Joseph Wilson's career gave him considerable experience. His arguments are well reasoned & I personally found his point of view compelling & credible. Not to be dismissed lightly, this book is essential reading to understand certain facets of diplomacy and the current Bush administration.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Firstly, I'm not a fan of non-fiction, especially memoirs. The only other memoir I enjoyed reading was Angela's Ashes so you get the picture.
This I loved. It's really well written. It's interesting. I read the whole thing over two days, it was that good.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I started this book after watching the movie. The book is a true page-turner and give you a very good picture of what went on with one of the most controversial situation of the recent years.
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