Buy Used
£3.31
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item is used and has some wear. Qualifies for free shipping and prime programs.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Politics of Modernism: Against the New Conformists Paperback – 29 Jun 1989

5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5 out of 5 stars 1 review from Amazon.com |

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 29 Jun 1989
£49.44 £0.01
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

Product Description

Review

Williams is the Western thinker who, along with Antonio Gramsci, has done most to enlarge our understanding of the political complexities of culture.

"A toughly analytic mind is fueled by the rich emotional resources of a creative writer."--Terry Eagleton

"Williams is the Western thinker who, along with Antonio Gramsci, has done most to enlarge our understanding of the political complexities of culture."--"Village Voice"

A toughly analytic mind is fueled by the rich emotional resources of a creative writer. Terry Eagleton
Williams is the Western thinker who, along with Antonio Gramsci, has done most to enlarge our understanding of the political complexities of culture. "Village Voice"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

The death of Raymond Williams in 1988 robbed us of one of the most formidable British intellectuals. Considered to be the founding father of British cultural theory, Williams was concerned throughout his life to apply a materialist and socialist analysis to all forms of culture, defined generously and inclusively as 'structures of feeling'. In this, his last major work, Williams applies himself to the problem of modernism. Rejecting stereotypes and simplifications, he is especially preoccupied with the ambivalent relationship between revolutionary socialist politics and the artistic avant-garde. Judiciously assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the modernist project, Williams shifts the framework of discussion from merely formal analysis of artistic techniques to one which grounds these cultural expressions in particular social formations. Animating the whole book is the question which Williams poses and brings us significantly closer to answering: namely, what does it mean to develop a cultural politics which goes 'beyond the modern' and yet which avoids the trap of postmodernism's 'new conformism'? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's not the politics you're thinking of 7 Jun. 2010
By K. Floyd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Politics of Modernism is a fantastic look at the way that political climates inform artistic movements. It's got a very specific Marxist bent to it, but the idea that art is not something we make up out of the air is compelling. He argues that in every generation the bourgeois produce unique, distinctively bourgeois dissidents. Modernism wasn't just an artistic movement, it came also from calls for women's rights, anti-imperialism, etc. I was shocked to read his assessment of the present economic crisis: "Managed affluence has slid into an anxiously managed by perhaps unmanageable depression. Some political consensus underlying it has been visibly breaking down, and especially at the level of everyday life [...] the dominant messages are of danger and conflict, and that the dominant forms are of shock and loss [....] Yet these rhythms are familiar to history. They can be traced, with some accuracy, to a dying social order and a dying class" (96). Except that this was written in 1972, which proves that these things are cyclical, despite their appearance of being unique every time. I have to confess at this point that I am, in fact, a literary Marxist a lot of the time, but after reading Williams' manifesto you'll probably find that you are too.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback