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Poisonwood Bible Mass Market Paperback – 1 Sep 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 400 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Harper Collins Publ. USA (1 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062213709
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062213709
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 3.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (400 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 241,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Amazon Review

As any reader of The Mosquito Coast knows, men who drag their families to far-off climes in pursuit of an Idea seldom come to any good, while those familiar with At Play in the Fields of the Lord or Kalimantaan understand that the minute a missionary sets foot on the fictional stage, all hell is about to break loose. So when Barbara Kingsolver sends missionary Nathan Price along with his wife and four daughters off to Africa in The Poisonwood Bible, you can be sure that salvation is the one thing they're not likely to find. The year is 1959 and the place is the Belgian Congo. Nathan, a Baptist preacher, has come to spread the Word in a remote village reachable only by airplane. To say that he and his family are woefully unprepared would be an understatement: "We came from Bethlehem, Georgia, bearing Betty Crocker cake mixes into the jungle," says Leah, one of Nathan's four daughters. But of course it isn't long before they discover that the tremendous humidity has rendered the mixes unusable, their clothes are unsuitable and they've arrived in the middle of political upheaval as the Congolese seek to wrest independence from Belgium. In addition to poisonous snakes, dangerous animals, and the hostility of the villagers to Nathan's fiery take-no-prisoners brand of Christianity, there are also rebels in the jungle and the threat of war in the air. Could things get any worse?

In fact they can and they do. The first part of The Poisonwood Bible revolves around Nathan's intransigent, bullying personality and his effect on both his family and on the village they have come to. As political instability grows in the Congo, so does the local witch doctor's animus toward the Prices, and both seem to converge with tragic consequences about halfway through the novel. From that point on, the family is dispersed and the novel follows each member's fortunes across a span of more than 30 years.

The Poisonwood Bible is arguably Barbara Kingsolver's most ambitious work, and it reveals both her great strengths and her weaknesses. As Nathan Price's wife and four daughters tell their story in alternating chapters, Kingsolver does a good job of differentiating the voices. But at times they can grate--teenaged Rachel's tendency towards precious malapropisms is particularly annoying (students practice their "French congregations"; Nathan's refusal to take his family home is a "tapestry of justice"). More problematic is Kingsolver's tendency to wear her politics on her sleeve; this is particularly evident in the second half of the novel, in which she uses her characters as mouthpieces to explicate the complicated and tragic history of the Belgian Congo.

Despite these weaknesses, Kingsolver's fully realised, three-dimensional characters make The Poisonwood Bible compelling, especially in the first half when Nathan Price is still at the centre of the action. And in her treatment of Africa and the Africans she is at her best, exhibiting the acute perception, moral engagement and lyrical prose that has made her previous novels so successful. --Alix Wilber, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Kingsolver's powerful new book is actually an old-fashioned 19th-century novel, a Hawthornian tale of sin and redemption and the 'dark necessity' of history." -- Michiko Kakutani, "New York Times""Haunting . . . A novel of character, a narrative shaped by keen-eyed women."-- Front page, Verlyn Klinkenborg, "New York Times Book Review" "Barbara Kingsolver has dreamed a magnificent fiction and a ferocious bill of indictment..What we have here--with this new, mature, angry, heartbroken, expansive out-of-Africa Kingsolver--is at last our very own Lessing and our very own Gordimer." -- "The Nation""A powerful new epic . . . She has with infinitely steady hands worked the prickly threads of religion, politics, race, sin and redemption into a thing of terrible beauty."-- "Los Angeles Times Book Review" "Fully realized, richly embroidered, triumphant."-- "Newsweek"Powerful . . . Kingsolver is a gifted magician of words." -- "Time""There are few ambitious, successful and beautiful novels. Lucky for us, we have one now, in Barbara Kingsolver's "The Poisonwood Bible" . . . his awed reviewer hardly knows where to begin." -- Jane Smiley, "Washington Post Book World" "Beautifully written . . . Kingsolver's tale of domestic tragedy is more than just a well-told yarn . . . Played out against the bloody backdrop of political struggles in Congo that continue to this day, it is also particularly timely." -- "People" "Tragic, and remarkable . . . A novel that blends outlandish experience with Old Testament rhythms of prophecy and doom."-- "USA Today" "The book's sheer enjoyability is given depth by Kingsolver's insight and compassion for Congo, including its people, and their language and sayings."--"Boston Globe" "Most impressive are the humor and insight with which Kingsolver describes a global epic, proving just how personal the political can be." -- "Glamour" "Compelling, lyrical and utterly believable."--" Chicago Tribune" "A triple-decker, different coming-of-age novel, but also a clever look at language and cultures." -- "San Diego Union-Tribune""A bravura performance . . . A subtle and complex creation, dealing with epic subjects with invention and courage and a great deal of heart." -- "Newsday" "A novel that brims with excitement and rings with authority." -- "Portland Oregonian""Kingsolver's work is a magnum opus, a parable encompassing a biblical structure and a bibliography, and a believable cast of African characters." -- "Atlanta Journal-Constitution""Memory believes before knowing remembers. Believes longer than recollects, longer than knowing even wonder." -- William Faulkner --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Until I read this book, I had thought I would never find a book I loved as much as Memoirs of a Geisha. I was wrong.
I finished The Poisonwood Bible about two weeks ago and am still having what can only be described as withdrawal symptoms now. I wanted to re-read this book the moment I finished it. Throughout the book, as the remaining pages dwindled, I began to dread the end, and made a conscious effort to slow down and savour the words on every page. It was a truly absorbing and beautiful journey through an incredibly well written and researched book - a completely plausible story of a family's experiences in the Belgian Congo in a highly political era.
The wife and 4 daughters of a devout evangelist follow Nathan Price in his mission to the Congo to educate the 'Tribes of Ham' in the teachings of Jesus, unaware of what they are to learn from a starkly different way of life than that lived in Georgia, USA. Wholly unprepared for the consequences of a white family's presence in a country which is being politically abused by the American Government, they all have lessons to learn quickly. Add this to the unrelenting and almost inhospitable environment of the country itself and the reader senses from early on that there is a recipe for disaster brewing. Indeed, the reader pre-empts and fears that moment's ultimate arrival, having developed an extraordinary empathy for the characters along the way.
The author writes beautifully, holding the reader's interest by providing a rich tapestry of historical and political education and an examination of family life in difficult times. The book combines humour and sadness with diplomacy and skill leaving nothing to dislike or criticise. The author herself states that she waited forty years for the knowledge and wisdom to write the book. Trust me, it was worth the wait. Read this and weep.
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Format: Paperback
The Poisonwood Bible is a wonderful book which I wholeheartedly recommend to anyone and everyone. I picked it up at a jumble sale and took it on holiday with me, hoping to be entertained for a couple of days, but instead found myself completely entwined with the story. Kingsolver’s ambitious narrative follows a Baptist minister, his wife and four daughters on their mission to the Congo in the late 1950s, as the region takes its first steps towards independence. The life of each family member is utterly changed by the experiences in the Congo, and even after the sudden and shocking ending of the mission the Congo remains the heart of darkness and of light in each life.
Orleanna Price, the mother, narrates the first chapter in each section, and each following chapter is narrated by a different daughter. This device allows the reader to become quickly and intimately acquainted with the family, but the father, Nathan, remains a distant and ominous figure, reported differently by each narrative. Rachel, the eldest, longs to return to her friends and home, Leah and Adah, the unidentical twins, become fascinated and at home in the Congo, and Ruth May, the baby, tries to understand what she sees around her, accepting her surroundings without surprise. Adah in particular offers fascinating, comic and razor-sharp portraits of those around her. Kingsolver creates an instantly recognizable voice for each speaker. The book encompasses with powerful themes such as freedom, redemption, free will, love vs. survival and many more. The girls have all been brought up on Nathan’s fire and brimstone religion, which leaves no room for compromise or the lessons that are to be learnt from other cultures.
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Format: Paperback
I came to this book with a fair amount of prejudice. Having just read Achebe's Things Fall Apart (an African perspective on colonialism), how could an American have anything to add. Yet Kinsgsolver, through the ingenious device of five different narrative voices (the mother and four daughters), manages to bring several completely different perspectives to the many topics coverd by the book. I found the book gripping, and as the sage evolves, intensely involving and it was a delight to find a book which I genuinely found hard to put down and then counted the hours untill I could pick it up again. This author is "mature" in the best sense of the word, bringing to her work an authority and insight which to me has elevated the work to the maybe cliched category of "twentieth century classic". I am pleased it was recommended to me and that I bought it and read it. Excellent
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Format: Paperback
I couldn't wait to get stuck in to reading The Poisonwood Bible, the blurb sounded fantastic. The narrative is shared between the four sisters, Rachel, Leah, Adah and Ruth-May and their mother, Orleanna. This adds an unusual dimension to the novel, as you get a really profound understanding of each character's personality (however, I found alot of Adah's entries frustrating with the backward text.)
At times this book was so beautifully written, so emotive and powerful that it reduced me to actual tears. At other times I stifled yawns.....personally speaking, I found the biblical and political references very hard going. I enjoyed being able to find out what had become of the women in the story once their Congo experience had come to an end.
Definitely enjoyable, but NOT light reading.
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