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The Poet Paperback – 2 Apr 2009

4.4 out of 5 stars 221 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (2 April 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741756995
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409116936
  • ASIN: 140911693X
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.4 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (221 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 190,495 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A suspense novel by a master of the genre. Once you're 50 pages in, I defy you to put it down (STEPHEN KING THE TIMES)

Book Description

A cunning, poetry-quoting serial killer of unprecedented savagery executes one homicide cop after another . . . An unputdownable thriller from the award-winning No. 1 bestselling author

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Connelly breaks away from his highly-accomplished Bosch series to tell the tale of a reporter Jack McEvoy who's brother (a detective) has apparently taken his own life. McEvoy eventually works out it was homicide, sees links to other suspicious cases and convinces the FBI there's a serial killer at work (lines from poems by Edgar Allan Poe are found on all the victims - hence the nickname) He then inveigles his way into the investigation.

The story fairly rattles along giving good insight into the world of tabloid reporters,as well as the skills used in the Bureau task force. Tension builds up nicely as the force gets closer to the killer, and twists and false trails abound.Many of these are predictable, and the ending is a little too convenient. Despite obvious cliches this is still a very good read and is strongly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
I enjoyed 'The Poet' because it had a very strong 'can't put downable' quality. It had a fast pace and it was exciting to read.

'The poet' was the second book I read written by Michael Connelly (the first being 'The Lincoln Lawyer') because having read one of his books, I concluded that he wrote well. In this sense, 'The Poet' didn't dissappoint. Connelly writes clearly and is able to keep the reader in suspense throughout the book. Connelly creates characters and their personalities well - he gives the characters that 'likeable' quality - which adds to the story. The plot is exciting and is clear enough to be understandable but is still able to suprise the reader, using twists and turns.

I enjoyed reading 'The poet' - it entertained me and was able to do so throughout the book (despite the fact that it is fairly lengthy, I was kept in suspense throughtout). I would reccomend this book to people who enjoy thrillers and books with a fast pace. Perhaps people who are keen on James Patterson but maybe feel like 'slight change of scenary!'
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Format: Paperback
You know how some artists do their best work in their early years and then become pale shadows of themselves in later years? It hasn't happened to Michael Connelly. In fact I'd say the reverse is true. "The Poet" was published in 1996 and the other 4 Connelly books I've read are from 2006 onwards. So it was quite a shock when I expected the same frenetic pacing and superb writing Connelly has shown in recent books to be completely absent in this, one of his best loved books. His latest "The Scarecrow" is the second book to feature Jack McEvoy, the hero of "The Poet", and was a fantastic, gripping read, paced well, written convincingly, and was a joy.

"The Poet" is a bulkier book at around 480 pages compared to his usual count of 400 pages but feels much longer. McEvoy plods through police reports, interviews with witnesses and colleagues, before meeting up with the FBI and Agent Rachel Walling. From there is a similarly slow moving "chase" across the country to find "The Poet" before he kills again.

The book hasn't dated well either. Many references to modems, asking receptionists to do searches through archives (the days before Google - how did we manage?), pagers (before the widespread use of cell phones), all show the mid 90s era of it. It's not really a bad thing, it's quite quaint, but it does take you out of the story and at times is unintentionally humourous.

One of the things I noticed was that in the 21st century Connelly, he doesn't bother with sex scenes. A simple sentence "And then they made love" suffices in recent books like "Echo Park" (2006) and "The Scarecrow" (2009) whereas in "The Poet" we get agonisingly bad sex scenes with descriptions of "from here to eternity kisses" (p.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
marred by a completely unnecessary, implausible, deus ex machina ending, which made me feel let down and cheated.

[The plot is described in any number of other reviews, so I'll go directly to my impression of the novel.]

Yes, a good book in its genre, and a very ably constructed one (notwithstanding a description of the FBI that probably is as far from reality as it could possibly be).
Why do we read? I think either to learn something, or for distraction. From this story youll'get the latter, in spades. It's very well written (you get to care for the two main characters), some grammatical mistakes notwithstanding, and a real page turner (I devoured it in two nights, and stayed awake until five AM to finish it). Unfortunately, it has two final twists, the first really excellent and somber, but the last out of the blue, possible but totally unexplained, and even ruining the first, which had been so carefully woven into the plot, to which it adds an unanswered question (how did the character surmount the emotional handicap?).
A real pity. If I were the author, for the second edition I would edit the story taking out the last few pages. They feel artificially tacked on, and I can't understand why he added them.

So, keeping in mind that this thriller is purely reading-to-pass-the-time, I'll rate it four stars without the last pages (say, until p. 473 of the MMP ed), and zero stars for the rest (say, from 474 to 501).

If you're able to stop at 473, by all means buy and enjoy the product. You read it to the real end at you peril.
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