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A Plague of Crows (DS Thomas Hutton 2) by [Lindsay, Douglas]
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A Plague of Crows (DS Thomas Hutton 2) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 124 customer reviews
Book 2 of 3 in DS Thomas Hutton (3 Book Series)
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 864 KB
  • Print Length: 283 pages
  • Publisher: Blasted Heath (5 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908688564
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908688569
  • ASIN: B00GWGYIK4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 124 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #32,999 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
This is my first Hutton novel, but not my first Doug Lindsay book - that pleasure went to his most excellent creation, Barney Thomson.
For those of you who have read the work from the Barney series (and if you haven't you should), you'll be aware of the amazing shades of darkness that Lindsay can create as well as the tremendous use of humour and character that are as much part of the sandwich as the butter and the bread.
What's different about the Hutton story in `The Plague Of Crows' is that it exists in the more mainstream world of the police procedural, not that it's an entirely conventional setting.
For the fans of the police detective and the ins and outs of the process of finding a killer, there's plenty here that will satisfy the appetite. There's also a huge amount more that is likely to leave fans of the genre expecting something extra from their next choice, simply because of the extra layers and dimensions Lindsay offers.
Hutton has been rediscovering himself after a suspension from the force, a suspension brought on by his super-strong sexual desire, his lack of care for what others think about him, his love of danger and his hard-as-nails fists. He's spent his time in a tent in the Scottish countryside and has reached a place of inner-peace, giving up the women, the cigarettes and the booze. When he's called back into operation to help out on a very particular case, it's inevitable that he's going to find his way back to his old habits and that things will spiral out of control. Him being a war journalist who has seen plenty, it's also easy to find some sympathy with him for his unabridged behaviours.
The thing is, the case is hugely different to most you'll come across. More macabre and intelligent than the majority of those you'll find in other novels.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is even better than The Unburied Dead. DS Hutton is a gripping main character, with a past that influences everything he does. Just imagine Jackson Brodie (the TV series version)with an alcohol and sex-addiction problem and with a very black sense of humour. It says something about the writing that Hutton's life - watching it inevitably spiral out of control - made me turn the pages more than the crime. Great book, fantastic writing.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the second in the DS Thomas Hutton series. This takes places chronologically a little while after the first book ends, and Hutton is still struggling with memories of wartime atrocities in Bosnia. The finding of three victims of a particularly gruesome crime in woodland beings back those thoughts, which we learn much more of as the book and the case progresses.
I didn't enjoy this one quite as much as the first - I can imagine the scenario and crime scene would not be to everyone's taste. It's still a superbly crafted, but dark novel, but I'd recommend starting with the first in the series, and as an introduction to the author it might be wiser to stick with the superb Barney Thomson series.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I liked the Previous Thomas Hutton book well enough to buy the sequels. A gruesome killer named the plague of crows is on the loose and the Glasgow polis are on the case. The flawed detective Thomas Hutton is living off the grid and is asked to come back to help catch this killer. He's soon rediscovers his usual vices of smoking, vodka and women whilst being plagued by his own demons. Somehow between logic and fluke Hutton gets on the trail of the killer. I enjoyed the well paced story, but I couldn't work out whether Hutton had been a soldier or a journalist in Bosnia, maybe I missed something . I felt that the denouement was a bit predictable and could have been more drawn out and dramatic. However I thoroughly enjoyed the journey and am looking forward to reading the next episode.
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A Plague of Crows and The Blood That Stains Your Hands both have interesting plots, very different to each other, but equally engaging. Depends what you are looking for; CROWS is more gruesome and at the 'you have to be kidding me' end of the market, whilst BLOOD is more of the 'everyday life gone wrong' type of deal. Both great and I certainly appreciate that the plots were miles apart. No recycling here.

Enough about plot. Characters - ah yes! In CROWS, Lindsay starts to lift the corner of the duvet to give the reader a peep at the dirty, heaving blackness carried around on Hutton's back. We already know this man is severely damaged by something in his past...and here it is, in all its fetid glory.

And then more stuff happens to him. How much can any man take, you may wonder, as Hutton moves from coffee to vodka to woman after woman.

A warning - you will feel like taking Hutton into a dark corner and having 'a word with him' about his attitude to woman. Stick with it though - trust me, but I did think for a bit that Lindsay had gone a bit too far with objectification - was it it just salacious writing or was there some purpose behind all the tongue lolling, breast fantasising? You'll find out in Book 3.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Firstly I must say read the Thomas Hutton novel The Unburied Dead before you read this one. There is a natural development of the character which could be confusing if the books are not read in order. It is also a good read and is currently free on Kindle.
A Plague of Crows is a fantastic book which reintroduces us to DS Hutton, an irreverent, self centred cop who spends as much time looking for his next sexual conquest as he does seeking a serial murderer. He is a hilarious character handled brilliantly by Lindsay, I rarely laugh out loud when reading a book but this character hits my funny bone. The investigation is fast paced, entertaining and accurately reflects the frustrations of weak leadership and internal politics that blight serious Police investigations.
This was the third Lindsay book I have read and I have already started my fourth, surely that is, of itself, a strong recommendation.
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