£17.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Pierced for our transgres... has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pierced for our transgressions: Rediscovering the Glory of Penal Substitution Paperback – 16 Mar 2007

3.9 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£17.99
£9.09 £7.59
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£17.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • Pierced for our transgressions: Rediscovering the Glory of Penal Substitution
  • +
  • Your Will Be Done: Exploring Eternal Subordination, Divine Monarchy and Divine Humility
Total price: £25.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: IVP (16 Mar. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844741788
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844741786
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 0.7 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 442,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

From the Publisher

A fresh, positive re-articulation of a central doctrine, in
the context of current debates.

From the Back Cover

The doctrine of penal substitution states that God gave himself
in the person of his Son to suffer instead of us the death, punishment and
curse due to fallen humanity as the penalty for sin. The belief that Jesus
died for us, suffering the wrath of his own Father in our place, has been
the wellspring of the hope of countless Christians through the ages.

However, an increasing number of theologians and church leaders are
questioning this doctrine, claiming, for example, that it misunderstands
the nature of God's judgment; that it divides the Trinity; or that it
misreads crucial texts such as Isaiah 53 or Mark 10:45. The doctrine has
been provocatively described as `a form of cosmic child abuse'. In recent
years, the criticisms - including some from within the evangelical
constituency - have intensified. Furthermore, the debate is no longer
confined to the academy, and has now found its way into popular Christian
books and magazines.

In response, Jeffery, Ovey and Sach offer a fresh articulation and
affirmation of penal substitution. In Part 1 they make the case that the
doctrine is clearly taught in Scripture; that it has a central place in
Christian theology; that its neglect has serious pastoral consequences; and
that it has an impeccable pedigree in the history of the Christian church.

In Part 2, the authors then engage systematically with over twenty specific
objections that have been brought against penal substitution. Their clear
exposition and analysis, and charitable but firm responses, are accessible
to all with a serious concern for the issues.

`This extended declaration and defence of the penal substitutionary view of
Christ's atoning death responds to a plethora of current criticisms . . .
with a thoroughness and effectiveness that is without parallel anywhere . .
. I hail this treatise as an epoch-making tour de force.'
J. I. Packer

`This book deserves the widespread circulation achieved by corresponding
contributions a generation ago - those of Leon Morris, Jim Packer and John
Stott.'
D. A. Carson

` . . . I commend this book for its comprehensive and fair scrutiny of the
many objections brought against the doctrine of penal substitution in
recent years.'
I. Howard Marshall

` . . . probably the most significant book on the doctrine of the cross
since 'The Cross of Christ'. It is timely and urgently needed. Let the
exposition of this magnificent doctrine both inform your mind and warm your
heart.'
Mike Pilavachi

`The authors of this work compel us to take seriously an objective view of
the cross of Christ; one that is not simply dependent on how we feel and
what the culture around us promotes.'
Michael Nazir-Ali

`At a time when some people seem determined to snuff out this doctrine from
what is sung and
taught . . . there is a need for the vital doctrine of penal substitution
to be clearly, comprehensively and compellingly explained. This book does
the job admirably.' Stuart Townend

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have not read it all but many/most of the arguments for the doctrine are set out. It is not possible even in a book of this length to go deeply enough in exegesis of some critical verses. Romans 8:3 is one of these: 'condemned sin in the flesh' - what does Paul mean by 'flesh'. The 'old' NIV nails its colours to the mast by translating 'in the flesh' as 'in sinful man' in the text, with 'or in the flesh' as a footnote. The 'new' NIV (speaking from memory) backs off from this and has 'in the flesh' in the text. The discussion on the Trinity, which I admit I have not read in detail, does not seem at first glance to sufficiently explore the issue: does the death of Christ for our sins propitiate the Father (top of page 132) or does it propitiate God? Anyone following the long debate on Ian Paul's website will be aware that these issues are very much under debate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great for essay arguments, because these three really are out on a limb.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I picked up my copy on Tuesday and finished it today in three sittings. It's one of those books that you can read quickly and don't want to put down.

Four great things about this book

1. It is drenched in scripture. Some readers may associate Systematic Theology with abstract natural theology or random proof texting. This book shows how to be thoroughly Biblical whilst being systematic. It clearly demonstrates how Penal Substition is taught in all Scripture and how this relates to other doctrines

2. It offers a gracious but firm response to opponents of Penal Substition. It takes time to set out the objections so they can be properly heard and then it answers them.

3. It nails once and for all the lie that Penal Substition is a modern invention. Buy it if only for the section on Church history.

4. It is pastoral. It helps the reader apply doctrine to the real life. An appendix at the end provides useful advice to the Pastor-Teacher wishing to preach the doctrine.
Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book has been heralded with the kind of fanfare that earlier ages reserved for Kings returning gloriously from battle. Witness the 10 pages of endorsements at the front of the book.

What is the fuss about and does this book deserve this wave of acclamation?

Many people sensed that the banner for the age old message of the gospel had to be raised when well known British evangelical Steve Chalke described the doctrine of penal substitution, that Jesus bore the penalty for our sins on the cross, as `Cosmic Child abuse' in his book `The Lost Message of Jesus'. He was not making an original comment. The phrase was first used by feminist theologians. What was shocking was to hear it from someone thought to be part of the evangelical establishment.

It was not only the repudiation of traditional doctrine, but the manner in which it was made that was deeply unsettling. There was an atmosphere of emotional and moral blackmail about it. The traditional doctrine is nasty, nice people don't believe it.

It is to the credit of the three authors here that they steer well away from the attempts at emotional manipulation that pollute much theological debate at present. Instead they present their case in an objective manner, basing it on their chosen texts from the Bible.

However, while this book is good as far as it goes, I do not think that this is the book succeeds in putting forward a full biblical doctrine of the atonement that can answer present attacks.

The book is divided into two sections `Making the Case' and `Answering the Critics'. The first section is drawn far too narrowly and there is not enough room in the second section to answer the 27 criticisms addressed in sufficient depth.
Read more ›
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I've not finished this yet but felt like writing it up now. This is a very timely book, coming as it does after many in recent years have been challenging the doctrine of penal substitution. What has been (and to a large extent, still is) a defining doctrine for evangelicalism, there have been a number of challenges to its status by those who claim the term evangelical, on both sides of the Atlantic.

What is so good about this book, though, is not just that they mount a thorough defence of the doctrine, but as the subtitle implies, they revel in its wonder and grace. It makes, therefore, for an encouraging and heart-warming read - which is not something one can say for many (if not most) theological tomes.

The book is in 2 parts - the first an overview of the doctrine from a biblical and historical perspective. The second takes on the specific criticisms. Particularly helpful were ch4 (pastoral importance of the doctrine) and ch5 (the historical pedigree) - these (quite apart from all the biblical and systematic evidence) makes for a compelling case (although i concede that i was pretty convinced already!).

As for the second part, the encouragement was that while they were tackling the likes of Chalke & Mann, Green & Baker, their method was constructive and positive. Again two chapters stick out in my mind - on violence (ch9) and justice (ch10) - both very strong contemporary objections to the doctrine which (particularly the former) in my experience are not taken sufficiently seriously by many traditional evangelicals.

I was mildly amused by the number of endorsements that this book had received before going to press (10 whole pages worth, right at the very beginning!).
Read more ›
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category