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Physics for Game Developers: Science, math, and code for realistic effects by [Bourg, David M, Bywalec, Bryan]
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Physics for Game Developers: Science, math, and code for realistic effects Kindle Edition

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Length: 578 pages

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Book Description

Science, math, and code for realistic effects

About the Author

David Bourg is a Naval Architect involved in various military and commercial proposal, design, and construction efforts. Since 1998, David has served as an independent consultant working for various regional clients engaged in both commercial and military shipbuilding where he provides design and analysis services including but not limited to concept design, proposal writing, detailed design and analysis, visualization, and software development among other services. He coordinated and led the winning design and proposal effort for the US Coast Guard Point Class (patrol boat) Replacement Program. In 2006, David joined fellow Naval Architect Kenneth Humphreys to form MiNO Marine, LLC, a naval architecture and marine professional services firm.

In addition to Physics for Game Developers, David has published two other books. He earned a PhD in Engineering and Applied Science in 2008 from the University of New Orleans. He has served as an Adjunct Professor at the University of New Orleans School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, where he has taught various courses since 1993.

Ever since his father read A Brief History of Time to him in middle school, Bryan Bywalec wanted to be an astrophysicist. While he will always have a passion for pure physics, he became more and more obsessed in high school with the application of those physical principles he was learning. Having been around sailboats his entire life, his decision to seek a degree in Naval Architecture at the University of New Orleans surprised few.

While working on his degree, Mr. Bywalec was employed as a network administrator for the College of Engineering. Having an office in an electronics lab, he explored the world of enterprise computing and became very interested in high performance clusters, remote administration of desktops, and robotics.

Upon graduating in 2007, he began his career at MiNO Marine, LLC and, under the guidance of David Bourg and Kenneth Humphreys, now focuses on finite element analysis of complex welded steel structures. His structural analysis work depends largely on the accurate approximations of non-linear physical systems. Bryan has completed several computational fluid dynamics simulations of exhaust gases from ship stacks and current flow around offshore structures.

In addition to his work as a naval architect, Bryan strives to create innovative ways to connect everyday objects to various control networks. From unlocking door locks via text message to developing a real time street car tracking program, he constantly searches for opportunities to integrate technology into his life.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6088 KB
  • Print Length: 578 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1449392512
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 2 edition (11 April 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CB30Y46
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #227,602 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Convincing physics is an essential ingredient to game design and development and this book provides a vast amount of information to help you understand what you need to think about for different kinds of interactions in your games. The book provides in depth explanations of various physics concepts and the maths around them. The book provides example code and numerous diagrams to explain the various concepts described in the book. There are also three appendices that provide code examples to help you develop your own physics classes.

The first six chapters provide a refresher on basics physics concepts including mass, inertia, and vectors; velocity, acceleration, and momentum; forces and pressure; kinetics and kinematics; collisions and projectiles. The second part of the book covers real-time simulations, including particles, rigid-body simulation, connections, collision handling, and physics engines. Part three of the book covers physics behaviours in a variety of common objects in games including vehicles such as cars. ships, and aircraft; guns, explosions, and projectiles; and ball sports such as golf and tennis. Part four of the book provides up-to-date content useful for developing games for mobile devices such as touch screens, accelerometers, using GPS data for interactions and developing games for consoles such as pressure sensors such as the Wii balance board, 3D displays, and optical tracking. The final chapter covers the rarely discussed topic of physics and sound.

The book is an extremely thorough and detailed, particularly on the mathematical side of the topic.
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