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The Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction Hardcover – 9 Oct 1986

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (9 Oct. 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 052132078X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521320788
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,370,088 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

' … unusually good of its kind … The book has an impressive range and at least two, sometimes three, contrasting theories of each phenomenon are given full exposition and discussion. The richness of debate is thereby very well conveyed, and the books' systematic and sympathetic discussions are exemplary.' The Times Literary Supplement

'This is not 'philosophy made easy'. It is a very clever book indeed.' The Times Higher Education Supplement

Book Description

This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind.

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Format: Paperback
The book has a good structure and is well written. It argued for a point which I did not agree with, but was fairly persuasive and good reading if you wish to get a grounding in Philosophy of Mind. I'd recommend it for undergraduates about to study a course in philosophy, or to beginners who are simply interested in the subject.
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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good introductory book, if somewhat biased 19 Nov. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book offers a clear and well written introduction to a difficult topic. Reading it can be a rewarding experience as it explains the most important problems of the philosophy of mind with a clear language. The only problem that I could find in it is that it doesn't pursuit the consecuences of their functionalist theory in the last chapters; instead they try to give some "non-standard" definition of freedom, which is not at all clear or even near of the common concept of that word.
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