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Persuasion by [Austen, Jane]
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Persuasion Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 505 customer reviews

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Length: 170 pages Word Wise: Enabled Audible Narration:
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Review

"Critics, especially [recently], value "Persuasion" highly, as the author's 'most deeply felt fiction, ' 'the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list.' . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne's character 'perfection itself.'" -from the Introduction by Judith Terry<br ><br >"Critics, especially Ýrecently¨, value "Persuasion" highly, as the author's 'most deeply felt fiction, ' 'the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list.' . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne's character 'perfection itself.'" -from the Introduction by Judith Terry<br ><br >" Critics, especially [recently], value "Persuasion" highly, as the author's ' most deeply felt fiction, ' ' the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list.' . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne's character ' perfection itself.' " - from the Introduction by Judith Terry --jj

" Critics, especially [recently], value "Persuasion" highly, as the author' s ' most deeply felt fiction, ' ' the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list.' . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne' s character ' perfection itself.' " - from the Introduction by Judith Terry --jj

Critics, especially [recently], value "Persuasion" highly, as the author s most deeply felt fiction, the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list. . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne s character perfection itself. from the Introduction by Judith Terry" --Guardian

About the Author

One of England s most beloved authors, Jane Austen wrote such classic novels as Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Northanger Abbey. Published anonymously during her life, Austen s work was renowned for its realism, humour, and commentary on English social rites and society at the time. Austen s writing was supported by her family, particularly by her brother, Henry, and sister, Cassandra, who is believed to have destroyed, at Austen s request, her personal correspondence after Austen s death in 1817. Austen s authorship was revealed by her nephew in A Memoir of Jane Austen, published in 1869, and the literary value of her work has since been recognized by scholars around the world.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 407 KB
  • Print Length: 170 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1451539347
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0083Z6AH6
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 505 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #438 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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By Aletheuon TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At 19, Anne Elliot accepted Frederick Wentworth's proposal of marriage. Although a capable and ambitious naval officer, Wentworth had little money and no connections with an important family and Anne's family and friends persuaded her to reject him. Not only Sir Walter, Anne's snobbish father and her older sister, Elizabeth, disapproved of the match but also Anne's respected friend and mentor, Lady Russell, who was trying to give Anne the care that her deceased mother might have done. However, at 27, Anne has not found a more suitable husband and she is in danger of becoming too old to attract one.
Anne meets Wentworth again when Sir Walter is forced by financial mistakes to let out his beloved house, Kellynch. The tenants turn out to be Mr and Mrs Croft - and Mrs Croft is Frederick's sister.
Anne and her family move to Bath, where she is repelled by the superficiality of their social life. Wentworth has become a captain and is quite wealthy from his share in the spoil of sea victories over France in the Napoleonic wars. She finds that, had she followed her heart, he would have proved a very eligible and suitable husband. She has sacrificed her happiness and his good opinion for nothing. Still bitter against her, Wentworth openly declares that he is looking for a wife and subtly makes it plain that he won't be considering Anne Elliot. Fortunately, Anne has another admirer and Wentworth is forced to face the fact that he is jealous...
Jane Austen exposes the kind of pressure and inappropriate persuasion society placed on young women at that time. Austen had a much-loved niece and came to regret deeply that she had advised her not to enter into the same kind of protracted engagement as Frederick and Anne had planned.
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Format: Paperback
Less well-known than "Emma", "Pride and Prejudice" or "Sense and Sensibility", this is an absolute gem of a novel, and my favourite of all of Jane Austen's works. It has all the flair and comic brio of her other, more celebrated work, but a sadness and delicacy of tone that elevates it to a different level. Anne is a magnificent character, with an intelligence steeped in experience coupled with a good and true heart, and is at the centre of a novel that offers absolutely everything that you could wish for in a novel. Perfect. Absolutely perfect.
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Format: Paperback
"Persuasion" is a great literary work and, to my mind, Jane Austen's finest book. This was her final completed novel before her death, and was published posthumously. As is often the case with Ms. Austen's fiction, "Persuasion" deals with the social issues of the time and paints a fascinating portrait of Regency England, especially when dealing with the class system. Rigid social barriers existed - and everyone wanted to marry "up" to a higher station - and, of course, into wealth. This is also a very poignant and passionate story of love, disappointment, loss and redemption. The point Austen makes here, is that one should not ever be persuaded to abandon core values and beliefs, especially for ignoble goals. There are consequences, always.
Sir Walter Elliot, Lord of Kellynch Hall, is an extravagant, self-aggrandizing snob, and a bit of a dandy to boot. He has been a widower for many years and spends money beyond his means to increase his social stature. His eldest daughter, upon whom he dotes, is as conceited and spoiled as he is. The youngest daughter, Anne, is an intelligent, sensitive, capable, and unassuming woman in her late twenties when the story opens. She had been quite pretty at one time, but life's disappointments have taken their toll and her looks are fading. She and her sister are both spinsters. Anne had once been very much in love with a young, and as yet untried, navel officer. A woman who had been a close friend to Anne's mother, persuaded Anne to "break the connection," convincing her that she could make a much better match. After much consideration, Anne did not follow her heart or her better instincts, and she and her young officer, Frederick Wentworth, separated. She has never again found the mutual love or companionship that she had with him.
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By A Customer on 24 Jan. 1999
Format: Paperback
A Cinderella story from the pen of one of England's finest. Anne is saddled with a father whose ego is the size of a small caribbean island and two sisters whom you will certainly love to hate. Elizabeth makes her father look modest, whilst Mary possesses all the sense and sensitivity of Sir Toby Belch. The fairy godmother figure(her deceased mother's best friend)has unfortunately made a singular error - she advised the youthful Anne against marrying a certain Captain many years ago and as a result our heroine was persuaded to let the love of her life slip through her fingers. Now perched firmly on the shelf, Anne finds herself unexpectedly swept back into company with her erstwhile lover. No longer so young & blooming herself, Anne suffers the mortification of watching him courting another girl and knowing that she has nobody but herself to blame. Enter another suitor, stage left - will Anne allow herself to be swept away by this new charmer? Will her father realise that beauty is only skin deep? Will Mary's long-suffering husband try strangling his dreadful spouse? Will Elizabeth win herself a husband? Enjoy.
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