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Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc Hardcover – 10 Mar 2011

4.7 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: LEONAUR (10 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857064916
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857064912
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.9 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Twin's serious, impassioned, meticulously researched story about a compelling heroine, the Maid of Orleans. This is Twain's celebration of the ideal woman: gentle, selfless, and pure, but also brave, courageous, and eloquent. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910), best known to the world by his pen-name Mark Twain, was an author and humorist, noted for his novels The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), which has been called "the Great American Novel," and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876, among many others.


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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A master storyteller tells the tale of one of the most remarkable persons in known history. How a young, illiterate farm girl became commander-in-chief of France's armed forces at the age of 17; leading her army, which had become accustomed to defeat, to victory after victory, putting a reluctant king on his thrown and in the process, for a brief time, becoming the living embodiment of France to its people.
It is a story of Joan's courage, intelligence and most of all her unswerving faith in her destiny and in her God, and how in the last year of her brief life she stood totally alone against her persecutors, whose sole objective was to have her die by fire.
Twain's admiration for her shines through every page, and the more I learn about Joan of Arc, the more I share his admiration.
This is a great book, and a must read for anyone interested in Joan of Arc.
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Format: Paperback
For much of the world, it is George Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan" that typifies the French heroine of the Hundred Years' War. Overshadowed by the controversies surrounding "Huckleberry Finn", Twain's version of the Maid of Orleans is too infrequently read. Yet it was his own favourite among the rich production of his writings. The reason is clear: Twain shed all the feelings he held about monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church to write a portrayal in the best Romantic tradition. Whether the reader is aware of Twain's views or not, the way he tells Joan's story remains vivid and compelling.
Twain was fascinated by the brevity of Joan's effective career. In the short space of just over a year, this girl's sense of mission carried her, and her followers, through a succession of victories. As he relates in this tale, it was her inspiration that turned the French nation from a defeated people to one marked for liberation. He shows how the populace took to her almost from the day she launched her effort. Freeing her native land from "the English yoke" meant more than military prowess. It was her wit and persistence which won her followers and converted hardened soldiers to her cause. Behind the scenes, however, corrupt court officials and a Church holding her role in deep suspicion impaired her frequently. Twain makes her almost a genius at evading their machinations or turning them into her supporters.
Twain says "this untrained young creature's genius for war was wonderful". He has her proving it by leading her troops in frantic assaults without ever killing a man. His portrayal of the dichotomy of a general unable to kill is magnificent - no other word will do. He shows her compassion for wounded enemies and her employing a convicted deserter into her ranks.
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By A Customer on 3 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is a work of great beauty. It makes me very interested in Mark Twain himself, to choose this subject and create this wonderful masterpiece.
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By A Customer on 2 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
I had not read any books on Joan of Arc, and was not terribly interested to either. I just picked it up because I thought it was weird for Mark Twain to have written it, so different from all the other books he had written. It was his greatest achievement and that he knew it shows in every page. She is brought to life, and the incredible, impossible, improbable accomplishments of Joan are believable and simply told. I loved it.
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By A Customer on 19 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
Mark Twain's Joan of Arc is the best book I have ever read. It is remarkable to think that this young, uneducated teenager had the courage to convince the king to give her an army to save her country. The book is especially interesting, given Twain's usual disdain for religion.
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By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 July 2008
Format: Paperback
A paean to the bravery and spirit of Joan of Arc, this novel by Mark Twain is also his most scholarly, having taken twelve years to write. Clearly fascinated by Joan's "voices" and her sense of mission, Twain delves into her religious passion and her belief that God has chosen her to free France from England and restore the Dauphin to the throne. Often focusing on the arguments and trials in which Joan participates throughout her life, Twain shows her childhood attempt to "save the fairies," her struggle to become general of France, and ultimately, her defense against heresy and sorcery. Through these, Twain attempts to reconcile her spiritual commitment with the tumultuous temporal world in which she is engaged.

Born in Domremy in 1412, seventy-five years after the beginning of the Hundred Years War, Joan, an Armagnac, supports the isolated Dauphin, son of Charles VI; another faction supports the Duke of Burgundy, allied with the British. When Joan is fifteen, her angelic voices tell her she will lead God's armies, win back France, and restore the Dauphin. By the time she is seventeen she is General-in-Chief of France. After lifting the siege of Orleans, achieving many victories, and finally, standing beside the Dauphin at his coronation, she is, however, captured by the Burgundians. Sold to the English, she is later surrendered to an Inquisition in Rouen for trial as a heretic and sorceress. The Dauphin fails to intervene, and at age nineteen she is burned at the stake.

Twain creates a fast-paced story about this tumultuous period, creating a series of repeating characters who anchor Joan's story from the time of childhood until her death.
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