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Comment: Pan paperback - 21st print 1983. First time published as Perelandra, previous 20 printings in this edition were under the title Voyage to Venus.. Faint crease in spine. 206 pages.
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Perelandra Paperback – 12 Aug 1983

4.3 out of 5 stars 44 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Pan Books; New Ed edition (12 Aug. 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330281593
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330281591
  • Product Dimensions: 17.4 x 11 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,839,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Los Angeles Times"

Lewis, perhaps more than any other twentieth-century writer, forced those who listened to him and read his works to come to terms with their own philosophical presuppositions.



"The New Yorker"

If wit and wisdom, style and scholarship are requisites to passage through the pearly gates, Mr. Lewis will be among the angels.



"The New York Times" Mr. Lewis has a genius for making his fantasies livable.

"The New Yorker" If wit and wisdom, style and scholarship are requisites to passage through the pearly gates, Mr. Lewis will be among the angels.

"Commonweal" Writing of the highest order. "Perelandra" is, from all standpoints, far superior to other tales of interplanetary adventures.

"Los Angeles Times" Lewis, perhaps more than any other twentieth-century writer, forced those who listened to him and read his works to come to terms with their own philosophical presuppositions. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

That night he lay on the slopes between the stems of the ripple trees with the sweet-scented, wind-proof, delicately-whispering roof above his head, and when morning came he resumed his journey. At first he climbed through dense mists. When these parted, he found himself so high that the concave of the sea seemed to close him in on every side but one: and on that one he saw the rose-red peaks, no longer very distant, and a pass between the nearest ones through which he caught a glimpse of something soft and flushed. And now he began to feel a strange mixture of sensations – a sense of perfect duty to enter that secret place which the peaks were guarding with an equal sense of trespass. He dared not go up that pass: he dared not do otherwise.

In the second novel in C.S Lewis's classic sci-fi trilogy, Dr Ransom travels to the planet of Perelandra, a beautiful Eden-like world. He is horrified to find that his old enemy, Dr Weston, has also arrived and is intent upon evil plans once more. As the mad Weston's body is taken over by the forces of evil, Ransom engages in a desperate struggle to save the innocence of Perelandra.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
C. S. Lewis is said to have found "Perelandra" his favourite among his own books, and an improvement over "Out of the Silent Planet". Though a strong Lewis fan, I'm afraid I cannot agree. OOSP attempts one thing, and achieves it perfectly. Perelandra fails by being too ambitious.

"Out of the Silent Planet" is an almost perfect story. The description of Martian creatures and scenery is delightful, without the author having to ram home how terribly significant it all is; and the evil targeted for attack is limited, believable, and allowed to collapse under its own weight. (Ransom's translation of Weston's speech out of the Shavian-evolutionary into Malacandrian i.e. plain English is one of the funniest things I've read.) In Perelandra, on the other hand, the author is always TELLING you how beautiful everything is, instead of letting you find this out for yourself, and the appeal of every new fruit or creature is swept aside by its being used as the occasion for yet a further sermon on the nature of pleasure.

The central flaw is the problem of any writer in depicting evil: how do you make it obvious enough that it IS evil, but also account for its appeal? It is cheating, and ultimately self-defeating, first to depict the beliefs you dislike, and then to make them more obviously evil by adding a few extra unrelated vices. Weston (the devil figure in this book) is so plausible in his attempts to mislead the new Eve that Ransom does not know how to reply other than by physically removing him from the scene. However, Weston also amuses himself in his spare time by pointlessly mutilating frogs.
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Format: Paperback
To criticize C.S. Lewis is to incur the wrath of millions of his faithful. However, Perelandra simply drags. Where Out Of The Silent Planet was a breezy sci-fi allegory of humankind's failings, and That Hideous Strength is simply the penultimate Lewis tale, this middle chapter is overlong and overly dense. Ransom is taken to Perelandra by an eldil, where his mission is to thwart the devil's temptation of that planet's Eve. Once more, Lewis's description of a foreign environment is rich and brilliantly imagined. Once the devil arrives (in the body of Weston) things kick into low gear. While philosophically intriguing, the arguments of Satan and Ransom and the questions of Eve quickly begin to appear circular and meandering. The climactic chase and physical confrontaion with the devil is both much too long and rather illogical. The denouement is classic Lewis, setting up Ransom's position for the final chapter of the trilogy with magical and moving brilliance, though it is too little to redeem the rest of the novel. Perelandra is a slow and tedious read, worth it only for the wonderful payoff in the third book, That Hideous Strength.
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Format: Paperback
Ransom takes off for Perelendra (Venus ) with the help of his angelic Oyarsa and lands in an ocean world with floating islands, bubble trees, small tame dragons, and seemingly two other inhabitants. They are human(but green)and one, the man, is missing. The woman is astonishingly innocent.
Ransom's old nemesis, the evil physics professor, lands on Venus soon after Ransom and it is clear that he is possessed of an evil spirit and up to no good. Ransom and he battle over the women's soul and the fate of the planet through long, fascinating dialogue,that illuminates Lewis' theology. Ultimately, the battle becomes physical and deadly.
I enjoyed this book a great deal, not the least because a friend told me that he found himself always agreeing with the evil professor. He does make some compelling arguments.
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Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed "Out of the Silent Planet", and proceeded on to the sequel. I was enchanted by this world of floating islands, and the prospect of returning to the Garden of Eden with hopes that we might "get it right". This one had me reading into the wee hours more than once. It's as close as I've been to obsessed for a long time.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this in school and liked the story, despite it's being completely inaccurate from a scientific perspective. The original title was Voyage to Venus, so maybe the new title allows one to imagine a strange new planet, somewhere else?
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Format: Paperback
Perelandra is an amazing book. After having just finished it, and digesting it, I came to the conclusion that the word "beautiful" seems shallow and crude in describing this book. Its imagery is very enchanting and exotic, and the storyline very gripping and, while intense and suspenseful, also very calm inducing: Lewis's descriptions of the planet Venus allow you to feel the purity, calmness, peace, and innocence of its setting while still appriciating the stakes at risk. I have read Out of the Silent Planet, and I loved it. But now it seems harsh in comparison to Perelandra. Most say the Space Trilogy is an allegory. I see it rather as a fictional extension to the history of the Universe as told in the Bible. It is a very stimulating and imaginative book. Get this one.
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