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Don Juan (Penguin Classics) Mass Market Paperback – 1 Feb 1973

3.6 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; Reprint edition (Feb. 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140422161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140422160
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 3.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 225,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Lord Byron was an English poet and the most infamous of the English Romantics, glorified for his immoderate ways in both love and money. Benefitting from a privileged upbringing, Byron published the first two cantos of Childe Harold s Pilgrimage upon his return from his Grand Tour in 1811, and the poem was received with such acclaim that he became the focus of a public mania. Following the dissolution of his short-lived marriage in 1816, Byron left England amid rumours of infidelity, sodomy, and incest.

In self-imposed exile in Italy Byron completed Childe Harold and Don Juan. He also took a great interest in Armenian culture, writing of the oppression of the Armenian people under Ottoman rule; and in 1823, he aided Greece in its quest for independence from Turkey by fitting out the Greek navy at his own expense.

Two centuries of references to, and depictions of Byron in literature, music, and film began even before his death in 1824. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Be careful ordering this book. Only order if all you want is the plain text. For that is all you get. There is no introduction and no notes. Just basic text.
I would have liked notes to help me better understand the text. However the price was quite good.
However I am now feeling like I want to buy the York notes to better understand the book and I could have avoided that if it just had notes!
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Format: Paperback
Basically i am writing this to contradict another review, the one called 'universal?' and dated january 1999. ive just finished studying this poem for my a levels, and i can safely say that absolutely everything in this poem is a parody or analogy about something or someone else, which is what makes it the masterpeice that it is. Juan's mother Inez is used by Byron to satirise both his own mother and his wife Annabella Milbanke. Juan's lover Haidee's father Lambro is used as a device to demonstrate the stifling effect society has on love etc etc. EVERYTHING in it is meant to mock something else. Byron writes little snippets in the style of Wordsworth then scoffs as at them to show how easy it is (for him anyway) to write that sort of poetry, and also lays into other contempories of his such as Coleridge and Southey. Byron says 'fools are my theme, let satire be my song.' which fools? the fools he knew from his life, who he wrote about in this poem. in order to get the most from this poem, it is probably best to read a biography of Byron in order to understand all of the reference he makes (most of which are extremely funny). i read Maurois and McCarthy, and i'd recomend the latter, 'Byron, life and legend,' by Fiona McCarthy as the best companion to Don Juan.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The introducing page-and-a-half verse dedication to Robert Southey - a not uninteresting part of the book, that's some quality mockery - is here reproduced with some faults. Three stanzas (1, 6 and 7) are cut in half, with the lower arcs of the y's and g's of the cut out parts still hanging out on the page... I'm going ahead and assuming this isn't intentional.
The other students in my course who'd bought the same edition also had the problem, so it isn't just an issue of my copy. I can't identify this printing error anywhere in the main parts of the poem, and it did seem coherent, so for now I'll just hope I didn't miss out on anything else.

The larger pages are a real benefit to reading comfort, but the leaving out bits is really sort of worrying.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This review is for the Penguin Kindle edition.

No link to the table of contents.
No notes or links to any within the text, which is rubbish as unless you have an encyclopaedic knowledge of the Regency period and its politics, classical mythology and Shakespeare (amongst other pools of learning) you will need to read this with access to the internet to decipher what you do not quite understand. Which will be a fair amount given that this is a 200 year old work. How can you be expected to read Don Juan without some guiding notes? - (October 2015, I found the notes at the end of the document but without a link to them within the body of the text means that to read them on a Kindle is one of the biggest pains I have ever come across. Unless of course you buy two Kindles and have the notes open on the other one, which ain't gonna happen really)

Byron's Don Juan is a great work of art and this particular edition by Penguin for Kindle appears to be a hastily cobbled together affair to make a few shekels. This is a shoddy presentation which should be given away for free.

The only saving grace is the introduction.

AVOID AT ALL COSTS!

This is the second Penguin classics transfer to Kindle that I have wasted my money on (the other being John Keats complete poems)

Byron 5
Penguin 0

Save your money and get a free copy from Project Gutenberg.
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By A Customer on 28 April 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Don Juan is one of those works that live forever. One of the greatest works of literature, Byron succeeds in encompassing everything in mock-epic. It has love, politics, passion and satire, to name but the few, and everyone should read it. Aeneid, Iliad, Metamorphoses and Don Juan, are in the same category, but the latter outshines them all!!
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