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The Paul Newman Collection [DVD] [1966] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.5 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 7
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000HWZ4DE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 290,537 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Based on a 1955 play by Gore Vidal directed by Robert Mulligan, The Death of Billy the Kid (which the dissatisfied writer remade for television with Val Kilmer in 1989 as Gore Vidal's Billy the Kid) and initially intended as a star vehicle for James Dean, Arthur Penn's breakthrough feature about the short life and disturbed times of Billy the Kid has not aged as well as memory serves.

Commonly regarded today as being rather less substantial than it first appeared, The Left-Handed Gun was one of the key demythologising Westerns of the fifties, contributing along with High Noon, The Searchers and 3:10 to Yuma to the increasingly revisionist approach to the traditional hero's psychological make-up. What once seemed bold and daring now seems more formulaic, with no great insights until it reaches the halfway point, where it becomes very clear that there is something seriously wrong with this boy.

Newman's schizophrenic performance is method acting inarticulacy at its most charismatic, rendering Billy's irrational explosions of violence all the more disturbing, although a little too charismatic to shift our sympathies away from him. It is left to Hurd Hatfield, who hangs around the fringes of the action, egging him on and then damning him for not being what he wants him to be and has remade him in his dime novels, to really define the schism in his nature. It doesn't help that the Lincoln County War between rival cattle barons is never really explained, leaving the background to events very fuzzy, while one is constantly distracted from John Dehner's solid performance as Pat Garrett by the fact that he has a bit too much eye-liner on.
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Format: DVD
Billy Bonney is taken in by kindly rancher John Tunstall, he starts to learn respect and education, but then Tunstall is cruelly murdered. Bonney having been robbed of the one man he respected, shows his darker side and vows to seek revenge on Tunstall's killers.

This was director Arthur Penn's debut feature film, and all the traits that were to mark his name in future pictures can be found in this very good, and troubling psychological western. Based upon a teleplay by Gore Vidal entitled The Death Of Billy The Kid, Penn ensures that any notions of William Bonney being a hero are well and truly vanquished with this damning portrayal of the legendary outlaw. That this point is rammed home is down to a quite wonderful performance from Paul Newman as Bonney, boyish ignorance and sadistic tendencies making odd bed fellows as Newman plays it weirdly perfect (the role had been earmarked for James Dean until his untimely death curtailed that happening). Backing Newman up is a fine performance from John Dehner as eventual nemesis of Bonney, Pat Garrett, showing nice touches of emotion from both sides of the coin. The rest of the cast do OK and nobody either harms or enhances the picture. This really is about its director and its leading man, both would go on to greater things, but this is a fine point of reference in their respective careers, a picture that both men can be rightly proud of. 7/10
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Don't be put off by the German writing this set released by Universal Germany includes The Sting,Slapshot and The Hudsucker Proxy all in anamorphic widescreen with a wide choice of language and subtitle options and is packed in a nice attractive looking hard plastic case.the first two films have mono sound but are nice and clear while Hudsucker is 5.1.the picture quality of all three is excellent.a real bargain for under 7 quid to get three excellent Paul Newman films.He's superb in them all.
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This was Arthur Penn's first feature film and is based on Gore Vidal's teleplay "The Death of Billy the Kid". It is one of a large number of films based on the teenage gunman William Bonney, better known by his pseudonym. The actual real life character did not have too many redeeming features. He unfortunately picked the losing side in the Lincoln County war, which lead to his eventual demise.

In this film Billy is portrayed by Paul Newman as an illiterate juvenile delinquent with a few issues. Penn used challenged characters like him in later films like "Bonnie and Clyde"(67) and "The Missouri Breaks" (76). Billy is taken on as a cowhand by the much older William Tunstall who becomes a Father figure to him. In real life Tunstall was only 24 years old. Shortly into the film Tunstall is murdered and Billy sets out to exact vengeance on the four killers. This leads to an eventual confrontation with Pat Garrett after Billy kills the last of the four at Garrett's wedding celebrations

Whilst this film is not the best about Billy the Kid, that accolade must surely go to Sam Peckinpah's "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid"(73) or the most memorable, Jane Russell's cleavage was hard to forget in "The Outlaw"(43), it is none the less a very interesting film. Newman at 33 was perhaps a bit old for the role, and he is hard to accept as a dimwitted Billy. Even in black and white you can see those intelligent and piercing blue eyes. They do not translate well to the inarticulate Billy in the film. Prior to this film Billy had either been portrayed as a misunderstood hero or the Devil incarnate, so it is groundbreaking in that respect.
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