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Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained by [John Milton]
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Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Kindle Edition, 18 Feb 2013
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Length: 253 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Review

"Offers an intensely filmic description of the events that countless artists have sought to visualise"

Synopsis

Presents the seventeenth-century English poet's epic works about creation, fall, and redemption of mankind.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1036 KB
  • Print Length: 253 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1530015502
  • Publisher: Waxkeep Publishing (18 Feb. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BILFSD4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #174,683 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
enjoyable classic
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
It pains me to think that 'Paradise lost' sat gathering dust, unappreciated, on my shelf for over 2 years. Having tried about 3 times to wade into it, I'd find myself beaten back by its immensly dense, flowery language. But to anyone who is even remotely put off by the 'thee's and the 'thou's or who thinks that Milton is inaccessable to all but the most learned scholars I would implore you, you simply MUST read this book. Once you've made your way through the first few pages you'll be amazed at just how accessible this piece of literary genius is.
For those who don't know, this is an adaptation of the 'Genesis' creation myth, centering around the temptation of Adam and Eve by a rather disgruntled Satan. The poem begins with the expulsion of Satan and his rebel hoardes from the kingdom of heaven, and as he and his crew writhe in 'tartarean sulphure and strange fire', Milton guides us into a dark mythical world where armies of winged serephin clash with fallen rebel angels in battles of truly epic proportions, and where the fate of mankind hangs in the balance. Absolutely everything about this poem is epic and monumental, the subject matter, the language. And although there are times when Milton tends to waffle (I can hear the sound of a thousand English professors aghast with rage...!) but with Milton, when its good, its REALLY good.
This certainly isn't a book that you can skim read over coffee, you do have to work at it,(a dictionary to hand is advisable) but the rewards are massive. I found 'Paradise Lost' a truly enriching experience that I cannot praise highly enough. Thankfully I have Paradise Regained to look foward to.
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By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 27 Dec. 2005
Format: Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent buy. Not only does this compilation contain '...regained', but it also has excellent illustrations. A worthwhile investment for anybody with even a passing interest in this area.
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Format: Hardcover
The item arrived and it is indeed a great piece of work, even though it is generally not very popular or regarded as highly as Paradise Lost.

What is disappointing and misleading is the photo of the cover. The book that I received is plain blue and there is no artwork on the cover or any external sleeve. Just a plain blue cover with golden letters on the side (there is nothing on the front or back).

I wanted this for a gift, hence I went for the hardcover, but I was looking for something a bit more nice looking that what I got.

So if you care about what the edition looks like, you might want to look for something else.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Classics don't need reviewing. Mystical and wondrous. A window into Miltons view on the world in another time FAB..
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So good to be able to build up a library of classic titles on my iPad - Kindle books are a godsend.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Milton is the second-greatest English poet (after Shakespeare of course)and Paradise Lost is his masterpiece. The sequel, Paradise Regained, is sadly inferior but still has plenty of good things about it. (This is a comically short review, as I am aware. See volumes and volumes of criticism by experts.)
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