FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Paper Men: With an in... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex Library Book with usual stamps and stickers. A slight tan to the page edges. Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Paper Men: With an introduction by Andrew Martin Paperback – 7 Nov 2013

3.7 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£3.27 £1.91
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Paper Men: With an introduction by Andrew Martin
  • +
  • The Pyramid: With an introduction by Penelope Lively
  • +
  • The Spire: With an introduction by John Mullan
Total price: £26.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (7 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571298486
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571298488
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 1.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 710,293 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

William Golding's The Paper Men is the story of Wilfred Barclay, a middle-aged novelist battling alcoholism and a dead-end marriage, and his would-be biographer, Professor Rick L. Tucker.

About the Author

William Golding (1911-1993) was a Booker and Nobel Prize-winning author, best known for his first novel, Lord of the Flies, published originally in 1954 and adapted for film in 1963. His other works include The Inheritors (1955), Pincher Martin (1956), The Spire (1964), Rites of Passage (1980), The Double Tongue (published posthumously in 1995) a now rare volume, Poems (1934) and the essay collections The Hot Gates and A Moving Target.

Golding was educated at Marlborough Grammar School and at Brasenose College, Oxford. Before his writing career, Golding was a schoolmaster. He was also a keen actor, musician and small-boat sailor.

In 2008, The Times ranked Golding third on their list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".


Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This novel was written after "Darkness Visible" and "Rites Of Passage," two of the novels for which Golding is most admired. It makes a very odd contrast. Golding was by then in his 70s, and the novels of his maturity are stark, dark and mystical. By contrast, "The Paper Men" is something of a cynical farce -- a sort of Portrait Of The Artist As An Old Dog.

We know from Judy Golding's wonderful memoir that, at this stage of his life in particular, the great author was besieged by admirers, students, would-be biographers and journalists. His relationship with these interested parties was complex. In part he was flattered, in part infuriated. As a very shy man, he was jealous of his privacy. As an accomplished actor, and a man able to overcome his diffidence and play the dancing bear, he could be very gracious to those he liked. As an artist fully aware of his own genius, he could be arrogant and brutal.

In all these responses, we can see echoes of Golding himself in Wilf Barclay, a celebrated novelist in full midlife crisis who is pursued by an American academic, Rick L. Tucker, who is determined to write the definitive biography.

The relationship between them, like Golding's own relationship to his pursuers, veers from knockabout farce to moments of lurid self-revelation. The important thing is that Tucker's questions, gauche and jejune as they are, force Barclay to consider himself objectively. In fact, both men are revealed to be frauds of various kinds. The ugly side of both is revealed in a procession of Deadly Sins, with resultant damage to the dignity of each.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have to confess to not finishing this book, which was chosen for our book club. After a while it became tedious and repetitive and I didn't particularly like the characters. Maybe I'll go back to it one day, but I'm in no hurry to do so.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
You know you have a problem when an introduction to a book - by Andrew Martin - speaks of its "density and mesmerising strangeness", which basically means here's a load of old tosh from an acknowledged master (a Nobel Prize in Literature winner no less) that I can't in all honesty find it in myself to praise. And, by gum, that would be right. The opening "comic" scene is one of the worst-written and unfunny interludes I've suffered in my reading life, and that includes some grievously poor stuff from Kingsley Amis. The description of a hangover is over-egged, inaccurate, and desperately strains for effect by being clever (a recurring flaw), and the first interaction between the main characters wouldn't have even made a Carry On film, though I can see Frankie Howerd playing the ludicrous Wilfred Barclay with some panache. Another reviewer has described the novel as "uninspired", and hits the nail on the head with that word, despite a bizarre Catholic-fuelled breakdown later on. I didn't manage to finish it but here's an odd thing: despite various hotel meals being described, nowhere does WG mention what was eaten, nor does he specify a single wine the protagonist tipples other than the obscure Swiss Dole. Surely a man of Barclay's wealth and passion for wine (he has a "splendid cellar") would have knocked back some fine clarets and burgundies? Forget those, though, readers, because this is unpalatable literary plonk.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By CPA on 16 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
One of my favourite books - ever. Hilarious in parts and very entertaining. It reads as if WG knocked it of in a couple of days, fluent and brilliant
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback