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Panorama Import

2.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 Dec. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Silver Sounds
  • ASIN: B000002GX3
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 391,513 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
an interesting album, Ocasek probably wanting to assert the bands experimental side after selling multi platinum on the first two
yet the songs are not as strong, there's a respectable effort to keep the cars quirky as well as pop
"Touch and go" was a modest hit, guitarist Elliot Easton shows why he's new waves best lead player with the concise and beautiful lead on that one
"Gimme some slack" is good not great and the title track "Panorama" is somewhat dull yet shows the bands impeccable muscianship "getting through" and attempt at another "don't cha stop" falls flat and is dull
the second side has a left overs feel except for "Up and down" a pogo rock gem this and "touch and go" are the best tracks
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Format: Audio CD
"Panorama" followed the Cars' hugely successful 1978 debut album and its more adventurous follow-up "Candy-O". However, the well of inspiration was well and truly drying up when they came to record "Panorama".
The songs are pretty much cars-by-numbers and drift by without making much of an impression. Two tracks redeem the album, in my view: "Down Boys" has some of the ferocious energy that enabled what was really a straight American pop band to survive in the post-punk/new wave environment of the late 70s. "You Wear Those Eyes" is was a forerunner to "Drive" and showed that the band could turn in a respectable slowie if they chose to.
Elsewhere, however, things simply don't take off. The title track has to claim the record for most economical use of a single chord - its monotony is almost an art-form in itself!
I'd save your pennies for "Heartbeat City" or their initial brace of albums, unless you're a real die-hard Cars fan.
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Format: Audio CD
How a band with such a seemingly natural talent for producing quirky, catchy, melodic records came to record as strange an album as 'Panorama' is a mystery. Opener and title track is a monotonus and overly long 'epic' that sounds nothing at all like anything the band had previously recorded. First single 'Touch And Go' is likeable and does at least have 'swagger and atmosphere' but again sounds unlike the bands previous work. In fact, only the powerful 'Gimmie Some Slack' and 'Don't Tell Me No' (both U.S singles) sound anything like the Cars of the first two albums. 'Getting Through' is also fairly good but the rest of the tracks simply 'riff unmelodically by' the listener and are totally unmemorable. Thankfully, normal service was soon to be restored with the much better 'Shake It Up' album. A strange beast this and one for completists only I think.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x936e98a0) out of 5 stars 82 reviews
28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x931410b4) out of 5 stars Panorama worth many listens 25 Aug. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Panorama is indeed an under rated album. Some 20+ years after its release, it still sounds as forward and inventive as the day it was released. Having been in my early teens when this album was released, my first exposure to The Cars was with a series of Candy-O songs I'd heard on the radio. I was instantly hooked on the Candy-O title track. Then came Panorama and CITI FM played Gimme Some Slack, Touch and Go and Up and Down. All 3 of these songs really resonated with me then as they do today. Songs like You Wear Those Eyes, Panorama, Getting Through, etc. seem similar in that they all fall within the supposed "Dark" mood of the album, and yet they cover the spectrum of emotions, including quite humourous lyrics.
It seems that some like to criticize Ric Ocasek for much of his mainstream work although he can hardly be blamed for wanting to actually make a living selling music; one would really need to listen to the man's full body of work, including his solo work and rethink the mainstream label. Still, few musical composers could claim to have a musical style so unique that it is almost instantly recognizable, within a few notes, as sounding like nobody else. The fact that most songs on their other releases are catchy and likeable should be no source of shame...it's not like it sounds great because it's a repackage of someone else's material as is a common practice in the current mainstream scene. Ric Ocasek has performed in many musical genres, including his first major label release with an early 70's folk bank called Milkwood. A complete listen to the Cars library should greatly impress new listeners with the large collection of great songs, and Panorama proves the Cars to be a band that was willing to break out of the mainstream at the risk of losing the mainstream ear. For one album they almost joined the likes of Wall of Voodoo's Dark Continent album which is as clever as it is "unaccessable".
Let's not forget the music scene that bands like the Cars rescued us from in the late 70's. Thank you Cars for 23 years of great listening with Panorama.
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x94e02210) out of 5 stars Underrated; A true dark wonder 15 Oct. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Many bands of the eighties had obscure albums released, but I've heard none quite like this one. When I first saw the cover to the album, I figured it will be different from your average Cars album, for it didn't have a picture of a woman on it. The electronics dominate the atmosphere of the album, with great textural guitar parts in the background. The album has really three types of music in it. Hard Edged guitar rockers (Gimme Some Slack, Down Boys, Running to You, Up and Down)the electronic songs (Misfit Kid, You Wear Those Eyes, Getting Through) and album defining new wave type songs (Panorama, Touch and Go, Don't Tell Me No). In my opinion, the best Cars album, and probably their hardest rocking album. Definitly worth buying.
28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9504f678) out of 5 stars Some of their greatest work 29 May 2001
By C. Sargent - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I remember when this album came out, a reviewer labeled it as "what happens when Ric Ocasek runs out of ideas for songs". What did he know? While I am partial to the Cars, having been a major fan since their first album, I find Panorama to be a very important piece of work in their short career. I consider Candy-O to be my favorite album, and their best release, yet Panorama is a fantastic ride. This album is why headphones were invented--to drown out all other noise so you can focus entirely on the music. What a rich collection of sound and word, indeed. Anyone who is curious about the Cars needs to get this album, if none other.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x962f5c60) out of 5 stars Panorama still brings a tear to my eyes 9 Nov. 2008
By Teri - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I consider the first three The Cars albums as a soundtrack to my teenage life. I was introduced to their debut album The Cars by my first boyfriend and I can remember many nights listening to it in the quiet darkness of his car after a football game. Then Candy-O arrived and was given to me as a Christmas gift by that same boyfriend. By the time Panorama was released, I was nursing a broken heart after the end of that sweet relationship. Every single song on Panorama seemed to help me through the bad times and mirrored that darkness I was feeling. Panorama is something special indeed. The sounds, the lyrics, the experience of this album is mesmerizing. The lyrics are both funny and heart-wrenching. My personal favorites are You Wear Those Eyes, Up and Down, and Touch and Go. Perhaps Panorama means more to those of us who were there when it was first released because it is so tied to our memories. However, I believe any true The Cars fan will appreciate the artistry and beauty of this album.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9312290c) out of 5 stars Cool Cars get a little arty 19 May 2000
By jason m carzon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This, the Cars' third album, is their most unaccessable and probably my favorite one- it's a departure from the first two hit-drenched offerings. The only 'hit' here is the dreamy 'Touch And Go': the rest is quite progressive. Panorama is dark and moody: the influence of Devo, Suicide, Kraftwerk and the Velvet Underground is evident, yet Panorama sounds nothing like these influences. Ocasek's darkness shimmers in both his lyrics and his ultracool vocal delivery and Greg Hawkes' makes good use of those oh-so-sci-fi synthos. He is one of the few keyboardists I know of who made full effect of cheesy toy synths(yes, he used some actual toy casio keyboards). Elliot easton's solos are all memorable here, and Benjamin Orr's voice is always pretty slick. Yeah, some of David Robinson's syndrums sound rather dated now, but at one point these robotic quirk-n-jerk rhythms were the future. Great late night listening, not the party album most of thier other albums can be. Not head music either. The title track is definately not your usual album opener and sets the mood for some of the rest. 'Gimme Some Slack' chuggs along with an almost Rolling Stones-ish rhythm guitar. The one romantic song in the abrasive bunch, 'You Wear Those Eyes', is a spacey, dreamy one with Ben Orr vocals that are just too cool for words. This could be an ode to some sort of space princess. A punkier, robotic 'Up & Down' is possibly the best thing on the album, while 'Misfit Kid' pulsates with alienated coolness. Makes you wanna wear your sunglasses at night. By the time of the Heartbeat City tour, the Cars were just playing Touch & Go from this album. It got lambasted in the press when it came out, too, making it one of those semi-forgotten moments in a band's history. An enjoyable album, one I always return to. An equivelent to this one would probably be Ric's own solo album 'Quick Change World' from 1993, which has a similar darkness.
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