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PWA: Looking Aids in the Face Paperback – 25 Oct 1996

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 9999 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (25 Oct. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330351931
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330351935
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 399,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

Oscar Moore’s PWA (Person With Aids) column in the Guardian gave us moving and informative insights into what it’s like to live with the physical deterioration that Aids inevitably brings. Humane and witty and written with a tough-minded, dry humour, PWA proved to be a comfort to people, whether touched by illness or not. As Moore’s postbag shows . . . ‘You have talked about Aids without self-pity while continually reminding me of the important things in life that also make mine worth living’ V., Bristol ‘Thanks again for the humour you bring into our lives through your own frustrations and fears; maybe you can help us learn to appreciate and enjoy each moment of our lives, without the necessity to experience crisis’ T., Eastbourne ‘I have nothing in common with Oscar Moore. I’m writing to say “Don’t give in”. He won’t, of course. He doesn’t know how to’ E., Milton Keynes ‘Your fears, your vivid writing, your courage have given me great hope in the face of the ghastly, and seemingly unfair, experiences and symptoms we share. I hope that many, like me, have been fortified and humbled by your joie de vivre and courage’ H., Exmouth


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Top Customer Reviews

I really enjoyed this book. Oscar Moore certainly does look AIDS in the face and manages on most occasions to raise a smile. There are some dark moments, but most of the time Moore is laughing at himself as well as his illness without making light of it. Very inspiring
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The book arrived in good condition in a very short time. I have had a copy previously and lent it to someone a number of years ago and didn't get it back so decided to buy another. It's written very humorously and witty yet very near the knuckle at times but through all his pains/setbacks/awful symptoms his sense of humour shines through. Gives an idea of what some Aids sufferers have to go through, some of the sympoms I would never have imagined
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Oscar Moore was an HIV/AIDS long-term survivor. At a time when people could ail and die within weeks of being diagnosed with AIDS, Oscar Moore's battle with HIV and then AIDS between 1984 and 1996 was gradual, allowing him to share his experiences with a wider public. Moore was highly literate and made no attempts to hide his (somewhat dissolute) life style (described in more detail in his memoir, "thinly disguised as a novel", A Matter of Life and Sex,.

Originally published monthly in The Guardian, I then only caught the tale end of the series, and was gripped by the honesty and intimacy with which Moore shared his plight. Brought together into a book, it remains a tale of courage and humour in the face of adversity.

Without a month between installments, it becomes clear that Moore concentrated on those issues most dear to him, particularly his failing eyesight, and yes, the constant attempts at wordplay are a little tiresome, but I can forgive that and still find this work fascinating, moving and important, even in the current period when HIV has become a far more manageable affliction.
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A superb account of one man's humour struggle with this virus.

Excellent, well written
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By A Customer on 3 Jan. 2002
I really wanted to like this book: Oscar Moore obviously showed great bravery in the face of his fatal disease. But his style is far too flippant for my taste: anyone knowing nothing about AIDS might come away from this book wondering what all the fuss is about. That Moore was able to find a 'funny' side to his condition is remarkable, but these 'postcards from the front' (they were originally published in the UK newspaper The Guardian) convey very little of the pain and agony he must also have felt. Perhaps he didn't want to dwell on such things, but to leave them out, I feel, dimishes the book's impact. Nor did I take to Moore's style, littered as it is with bad puns and dated (then-)topical references. All in all, a very disappointing read: I'm sure there are better books on this subject.
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