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Comment: Book Club Edition. Good, clean, tightly bound book. Slight wear to dust jacket.
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PENGUIN BOOKS THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS JOHN WYNDHAM COMPLETE UNABRIDGED Unknown Binding – 1956

4.5 out of 5 stars 286 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B000TYF3AY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (286 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,634,249 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Here I sit at 19, about to go back to university for my second year studying English and I find myself wondering how I can value a mid 20th century science fiction novel over all the classics and anything else on my bookshelf.

Then I look at the front cover and see the quote "One of those books that haunts you for the rest of your life" and realise that quote sums up in one sentence exactly why I love this book to the exclusion of all others.

I must have first read this at age 11/12 and having done so many times since it NEVER loses its appeal. A love story, a story of immense tragedy, of politics, of the fragility of modern life and above all of the undeniable essential nature of mankind Wyndham incorporates all these facets into a perfect tale.

Perhaps I am viewing it through rose tinted glasses because of the effect it had on me at such an impressionable age, but judging by everyone else's reviews I doubt this very much. I don't think I am being melodramatic when I say this novel opened my eyes to the true nature of the world. The characters are perfect, I felt like they were real people and at the end of every reading I am sad to close the last page and say good bye to them, if only for a short while.

My dog eared and much loved copy takes pride of place on my bookshelf. This is a novel for anybody out there who looked at the world around them and wondered... what if?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am presently duplicating my favourite books from my print library and downloaded this a few weeks ago. Yesterday I got around to reading it. I was horrified to discover that not only had the entire text been translated into US English but whole sections had been deleted!

This is a classic book. It was on the GCE curriculum. It is a desecration to mutilate it in this way. Furthermore, there is nothing to suggest that the book has been abridged
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Day of the Triffids is a favourite from my childhood that I revisit often. However, this is not the full text; some scenes seem to have been considered surplus to requirements: The suicidal doctor; Umberto and the exposition of the Triffids' origins and worldwide spread (I didn't read much further once I realised). They've made a mess of it too; Umberto is mentioned later in the text despite having been excised, for example. I could see no mention of the fact that this is an abridged version. Avoid.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Some of the best sci-fi has a long shelf-life because it's long-sighted, prescient - prophetic even. Day of the Triffids is a fine example of a science fiction tale that has as much to say about what worries and frightens people today as it did over 50 years ago. It all starts in a comfortable, well ordered, peaceful Britain, where a man who has suffered an accident at work is waiting in his hospital bed, to have the bandages removed from his eyes. As far as he knows, everything is fine, except the clock has struck 8 O'clock and he hasn't heard any sign of the medical staff. The quiet, orderly peacefulness is deceptive though. Politics, economics, technology and, most of all, hubris have the world balancing on a knife edge and it will only take a chance slip or two to plunge human civilisation into chaos. The situation:
1) There are satellite weapons hanging in the sky - out of sight and out of mind, but threatening the world with germ-warfare, nuclear attack and other ghastly inventions of amoral science;
2) A plant has been bred or genetically modified by the dastardly enemies of democracy, to provide a very useful type of oil that is going to make fish oil and a range of other profitable oils obsolete, thereby threatening certain Western economic interests.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This novel is the story of a disaster that is caused by ecological disaster, genetically altered plants and satellite warfare. These are such modern and relevant themes today it's amazing to consider how ahead of it's time this book was when it was written. The recent hugely successful movie 28 Days Later borrows most of it's ideas from this book, and the other "ruined earth" novels of this period by John Christopher, John Wyndham and (earlier) by HG Wells. This shows that this book, or at least it's ideas, can still be popular after all this time.
The hero and narrator Bill awakes in hospital following an accident. He finds that just about the entire population of London has gone blind following a comet and it seems that he is the only one who can still see. He emerges into the silent, ruined, confused & helpless world and begins his journey to survive. Now that no one can see there is no longer any order and blind people very quickly die or descend into anarchy. Meanwhile the Triffids, a new genetically modified stinging plant, become a very real and dangerous threat now that human superiority is gone.
The first couple of chapters of this novel have never been bettered in painting an electric atmosphere. The reader gets a very real sense of the isolation and danger in the new world. It's no surprise that "Wyndhamesque" is an adjective often used to describe gripping and eerie atmospheres in books and film. Reading the opening you are left biting your nails watching the action unfold as if you were actually there.
As well as a great story there is a great deal of thought behind this book. There is much discussion about what the new society of survivors need to survive, and some augments about religion, class and morals along the way.
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