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P J Harvey RID OF ME

4.7 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: too pure
  • ASIN: B00FZMU3KA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,005,326 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

P J Harvey RID OF ME

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Yes, that's right. Rid of Me has to be one of the hardest-rocking, most kick-ass, most anti-pop records I've ever heard. It is an absolute masterpiece of bile and anger, violence and hate. It's so extreme that it feels less like a rock album than a volcanic exorcism of personal demons. Rarely have I heard so much rage and power harnessed onto tape. It is truly exhilarating.
Rid of Me is PJ Harvey's second album, released just a year after her critically acclaimed 1992 debut Dry. Whereas Dry sounded naïve, youthful and almost innocent, the follow-up has a much harder edge to it. The sound is brutally raw, the lyrics are more bitter and wise, the anger is sharper and more pointed. It's a more thrillingly extreme affair all round. Steve Albini's in-your-room production is absolutely perfect for bringing out this nasty side of PJ. He's worked with Pixies and Nirvana; in an interview at the time, PJ explained that she wanted Albini to record them like a live band, so that you could feel the instruments pounding away before you with every hacking guitar riff and thunderous drum kick.
The shocking title track is a Fatal Attraction-style revenge fantasy about a scorned, obsessed lover tormenting her old flame. It starts slowly as a barely audible whisper before exploding into noise at the chorus ("Don't you wish you never never met her!") and building to an unforgettable climax of "Lick my legs I'm on fire, lick my legs I'm desire"), repeated over and over like an unholy mantra. 50Ft Queenie is a sneering, mocking cock-rock parody with a laugh-out-loud chorus of "Hey I'm the king of the world, you oughta hear my song/You come and measure me, I'm 20 inches long". The shrieking two-minute explosion of Snake tells the story of Adam and Eve from a fierce new perspective.
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Format: Audio CD
This is the blues! The blues plugged straight back into the electrifying jolt of it's originators, by-passing the soulless, staid, and indulgent meanderings of Clapton and his ilk. The blues made vital again.
Produced by underground hero Steve Alibini, who would later produce Nirvana' 'In Utero', Polly's voice and the guitars are pushed right to the front of the mix in a feral howl. The guitar parts are superb, the slide playing in particular used to strking effect as it had been decades earlier by Elmore James.
The music, all anguish, heartache and obsession, is for the most part echoed by the lyrics, but there's also a dark humour at work here, which too often goes ignored in (male) critics rush to stereotype PJ as the hysterical woman.
Purely and simply a fantastic album, and one that reclaimed a legacy for too long despoiled.
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Format: Audio CD
This is currently my favourite PJ Harvey album, though I think that says more about my current state of mind than the consistently high quality of all of Polly's recordings, my advice is to buy them all really. I think the line "I might as well be dead, but I could kill you instead" sums up Rid Of Me to me, the fine line between unbearable heartbreak and murderous hatred. This is music which is equally enjoyable whilst viciously stabbing pins into a voodoo doll, or exhaustedly crying yourself to sleep again. Polly understands the fine line between love and hate; "Did I tell you you're divine?" and "you snake, you dog, you flithy liar". This is frankly an essential album for anyone who has ever been hurt, in other words an essential album for everybody. Buy this, you will not regret it
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Format: Audio CD
After I had listened to the album succeeding this one, the lukewarm To Bring You My Love (which I loved initially but slowly grew to realise it is actually fairly dull), I decided to move backwards in time to one of Polly's more "raw" albums, as called so by many critics. And oh, i was not disappointed.
The album opens with the spectacular title track, which begins with the line "Tie yourself to me". A creepy but spectacular song, which ends with a voice screaming "lick my legs, I'm on fire". Although nothing throughout the rest of the album reaches the unhinged brillance of the title track (which supposedly caused a music journalist to crash her car), the album is filled with some great raw punk songs like "Snake", "Legs" and the string-led "Man Size Sextet" (which is somehow a punk song even with strings, although there is a guitar-based version minus the "sextet" part later in the album), as well as more conventional hard rock songs like "Missed", "Dry" and "Yuri-G".
My favourite song on the album is prehaps the heavy, femenist rocker "Rub Till it Bleeds", which features some of the coolest, most ominious guitar at the beginning, then explodes into a flood of defiance, as Harvey howls "can you believe me, I'm calling you weak?". A truly inspiring song, if you can ignore the sexual overtones.
This album isn't without it's faults, though. I find "Legs" to be fairly boring, and the cover of Bob Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited" does not do the original justice. The album redeems itself, though, pulling out a string of great songs in the second half which ends with the four minute "Ecstacy".
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