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Oxford Murders [Blu-ray] [2010] [US Import]

2.6 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

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£12.67 Only 6 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by Newtownvideo_EU.

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: R (Restricted) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Magnolia Pict Hm Ent
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003X82CYS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 207,242 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

A woman is murdered in Oxford. Her body is discovered by two men who meet for the first time at that moment: Arthur Seldom, a prestigious professor of logic, and Martin, a young graduate student who has just arrived at the university hoping to study with Seldom. It quickly becomes clear that this is the first in a series of murders, all of which are announced by the murderer with strange mathematical symbols. Professor and student join forces to try and crack the code and thus begins an elaborate puzzle, in which nothing is at it seems, and the truth is elusive.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
In David Cronenberg's remake of The Fly, Jeff Goldblum demonstrates a problem with his telepod, as he transports a steak. The steak appears at the other end, but while it looks like a steak, fries like a steak and smells like a steak, the tastes makes one long to chew on fast-food Styrofoam boxes.

The Oxford Murders (2008) is much like that steak. Based on the novel of the same name by Argentine mathematician Guillermo Martinez, the movie stars Elijah Wood as an American maths student who becomes the protégé of an Oxford professor played by John Hurt, and the two of them get involved investigating a series of murders around campus seemingly connected to an obscure mathematics problem. Along the way, Elijah gets mixed up with two women, played by Leonor Watling and Julie Cox, both of whom appear as potential suspects, as well as Elijah's student rival Podorov, played by Torchwood's Burn Gorman. See? There's some talent there, the makings of a potentially good story, the director Alex de la Iglesia is an experienced man whom some cineastes might know from his cult film Accion Mutante (1993), and the screenplay is based on a best-selling novel from a well-established writer.

So, it looks like a good companion for the evening. But it ends up like a drunken, thieving date with more issues than the complete run of Superman comics. I watched it, rapt in wondering how bad this could get, how offensive and weird this movie could end up. And to my horror, it kept getting worse, like watching a snake slowly swallow a man on YouTube.

So how did it get this way?
Read more ›
4 Comments 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By Spider Monkey HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Mar. 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
`The Oxford Murders' is quite simply one of the worst films I have seen in years. A sad way to start any review, but true never the less. The acting is terrible, from all concerned, it is wooden and infuriating to watch. The Dialogue is sloppy, inauthentic, stilted and detracts from the meagre plot. You are brought crashing out of the weak storyline by the combination of poor dialogue and terrible acting, which could've have been delivered with more humanity by a wooden marionette puppet. The direction is jerky and tries too hard to be clever where you'd be happy with a coherent narrative and clear plot execution. The storyline and script is flawed in the extreme, there are so many holes in this film from the outset that it left me infuriated to watch it. It is hard to pinpoint one example as they were numerous and glaringly obvious. The police talk to the professor and student about case developments at regular intervals when they are also prime suspects for gods sake! This film is meant to be set in 1993 and yet the set designers and researchers feel it was appropriate to use 80's police cars and equipment and litter the film with other out of sync settings and props. I could go on, but suffice it to say that as far as murder mysteries go this is dire and as an afternoons viewing goes this is a waste of time and you can easily find anything to do that would be more productive than watch this flawed, infuriating and ridiculous film.

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By Bluebell TOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 Dec. 2008
Format: DVD
I rented this from Lovefilm and so am grateful that I didn't waste much money on this tedious and very disappointing film. The excellent cast is wasted. John Hurt has to spout long-winded, pretentious, philosophical pseudo-science that simply bores. To lift the tedium there are some rather unbelievable, frenetic sex scenes in which the young 'hero' effortlessly seduces women he's just met. If you want murder in Oxford--watch Morse. Colin Dexter knows how to write gripping murder stories.
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Format: DVD
The whodunit, like horror and science fiction, rarely inspires Oscar-nominated performances and this one is no exception. That should be no surprise of Elijah Wood, who always looks like a hobbit caught in the headlights (anyone who saw him in Green Street will have some idea what to expect) but John Hurt's scenery-chewing turn is more unexpected. As for the guy playing the Russian student, well, let's just say that ALL the acting here is truly, truly dreadful.

The plot, on the other hand, is pretty clever. The trouble is that the book on which this is based was obsessed with ideas, high-level concepts and its own cleverness, rather like a version of The Da Vinci Code for those with above-average IQs. It was inevitable that it would be unfilmable. What we end up with is so much intricate exposition spoken so quickly that most viewers will just give up and those who try to pay attention will lose all sympathy with the characters because, frankly, nobody talks like that.

So, yes, it's a terrible film - but I found it strangely watchable and the twist is really very ingenious. If you're feeling in an ironic mood and there's no Poirot on ITV3, you might actually want to give it a try!
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Format: DVD
I watched this film dreading it was going to turn out just like the reviews said so. I watched the first ten minutes and was interested in the idea of numbers having meaning etc etc already. I waited for the storyline to turn into a load of rubbish but it never happened.

I found the whole plot enticing and was always looking forward for the next piece of evidence to be revealed and the next mystery to be solved. It is like an elaborate crime thriller and I can see how it was compared to the Da Vinci code the whole feel of the film is very similar.

There were of course some negaitve points as there are with any film such as the somewhat unneccessary dubbing and perhaps the film could have stayed on the main storyline and not got as sidetracked. But other than that there are no other major problems.

I can't really tell you much about the storyline itself without giving away important pieces of the film. But the basic plot is that there is a series of murders happening in or around Oxford with Mathmatical symbols left at each one. A proffesor and a determined student of Maths try to uncover the mystery in order to prevent anyone else dying. Everyone could be a suspect and the whole idea of Trust no-one comes into play.

Overall I rate this film quite highly it is not a huge blockbuster but it does appeal to those interested in Philosophy, Maths and most importantly crime solving storylines. My advice is don't listen to all the people who lost interest after 5 minutes so decided to write an entire review on the whole movie based on the opening credits. Give it a try.
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