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The Oxford Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology (Oxford Handbooks) Hardcover – 31 Mar 2011

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 1110 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1st Edition edition (31 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199212147
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199212149
  • Product Dimensions: 24.9 x 6.4 x 18.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,101,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

The most significant collection on the subject since David Wilson's... a once-in-a-generation collection. (Alex Burghart, Times Literary Supplement)

well written and well edited ... the scope and coverage of the Handbook mean that its discussions and evaluations will be current for many years to come. The volume sets out to provide a resource for the ongoing study of Anglo-Saxon archaeology and it has achieved that goal. (Zoe Devlin, European Journal of Archaeology)

offers a wealth of knowledge of all aspects of contemporary research into Anglo-Saxon archaeology, and will become a crucial reference as a starting point to anyone studying the period or a particular topic. (Matilda Holmes, Archaeological Review from Cambridge)

an invaluable resource for students and scholars of Anglo-Saxon England. (Thomas Pickles, Medieval Settlement Research)

scholarly and wide-ranging ... And copious it is, with every aspect of life, death and spirituality examined in ten parts, each introduced by a well-chosen voice in the field: (Madeleine Hummler, Antiquity)

This is still the only place where one can find the whole range of current scholarly debates grouped into one volume. Whether one wishes to use it as introductory reading or as an up-to-date bibliographical resource, anyone taking the study of the Anglo-Saxon period seriously ought to place a copy on their shelf. (Letty Ten Harkel, The English Historical Review.)

About the Author

Helena Hamerow is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology, Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford. David A. Hinton is Emeritus Professor, University of Southampton Sally Crawford is Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology, Birmingham University

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By Martin Turner HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Aug. 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Helena Hamerow accomplished one of the most painstaking tasks in Anglo-Saxon archaeology: unravelling the damaged artefacts of the Taplow Barrow. The same meticulous but ultimately satisfying approach is clear in this handbook, which she jointly edits with David Hinton and Sally Crawford.

I am slightly uncomfortable about the term 'handbook'. This is essentially a series of essays by experts summarising the latest scholarship in a range of important fields. It is not really the same kind of book as, say, the Handbook for Sound Engineers. Nonetheless, it is a fascinating, detailed and extensively referenced book which will save the archaeology undergraduate hundreds of hours tracking down journal articles in the library or sifting through JSTOR.

This is a superb summary of the current state of the field.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a relative newcomer to Anglo-Saxon studies, I have found this book immensely helpful. It is, as its over 1000 pages suggests, weighty in all senses of the word. Inevitably, there is some unevenness in terms of style and level of detail. Having said that, the book's organisation into ten key themes increases its manageability and enables a more coherent understanding of what is involved in ongoing debates such as the significance of place-names.

Highlights for me included: Catherine Hills on fundamental issues in A-S history and archaeology; Simon Esmonde Cleary's succinct statement of his latest views concerning the ending of Roman Britain; Susan Oosthuizen concerning Anglo-Saxon fields (and the whole section on food production more generally); the late Margaret Gelling on place-names in archaeology. Martin Carver's What Were They Thinking? prompts thoughtful reflection in the manner intended. Helena Hamerow's excellent chapters appear in very similar guise in her book Rural Settlements and Society in Anglo-Saxon England (2012) but an element of re-reading repays the attention given.

Any reservations? Well, depending on the definition of Handbook, it could have been helpful to have included extracts from excavation reports such as those on West Stow, Mucking or Wasperton. These would not have been new as such but would illustrate the basis on which of the observations in the book have been formed.

Overall, superb!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very pleased with item and service.
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