£9.95
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Ovid's Heroines has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Ovid's Heroines Paperback – 30 May 2013

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.95
£3.54 £5.46
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.95 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Ovid's Heroines
  • +
  • Moss Witch: And Other Stories
  • +
  • All the Birds, Singing
Total price: £28.92
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Bloodaxe Books Ltd (30 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852249765
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852249762
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.5 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 451,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

In many ways Pollard, a wunderkind who wrote her first poetry collection while still at school, is a good match for the equally precocious Ovid...these are lively versions, seasoned with both agony and irony, reanimating Ovid's originals. --Josephine Balmer, The Times

Ovid died in exile, booted out of Rome for what he described as carmen et error - a poem and a mistake. These letters remind us that he, of all Latin love poets, understood the plight of the person left behind, waiting for news. He knew that even bad news was less excruciating than no news. And this breezy, witty translation should give new readers the chance to share this understanding. --Natalie Haynes, The Guardian

The themes are ancient - guilt, grief, the almost unbearable com-mingling of beauty and suffering but shown through contemporary globalised life in all its grossness and glory... Pollard's wit, honesty and recklessness. --Frances Leviston, Yorkshire Post

About the Author

Clare Pollard was born in Bolton in 1978 and lives in London. She has published four collections with Bloodaxe: The Heavy-Petting Zoo (1998), which she wrote while still at school, Bedtime (2002), Look, Clare! Look! (2005) and Changeling, which is a Poetry Book Society Recommendation. Her translation Ovid's Heroines was published by Bloodaxe in 2013. Her first play The Weather (Faber, 2004) premièred at the Royal Court Theatre. She works as an editor, broadcaster and teacher. Her documentary for radio, My Male Muse (2007), was a Radio 4 Pick of the Year. She is co-editor, with James Byrne, of the anthology Voice Recognition: 21 poets for the 21st century (Bloodaxe Books, 2009).


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Graham Mummery TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 19 July 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It’s hard to know whether to start with Clare Pollard, or Ovid, reviewing this assured collection of poems. In the introduction she states her intention to recreate modern versions of Ovid’s “Heroides” following the example of Ted Hughes in Tales from Ovid: Twenty-four Passages from the "Metamorphoses". An ambitious task, perhaps, yet what is done here is carried off with aplomb.

Having had her first collection of poems published in her teens, Pollard has always had an assured voice in her writings. Her public readings have considerable power, due as much to the quality of her writing as to her presence on the podium. Her mastery words is impressive. She has never be satisfied to rest on her laurels. The poems here, as with her previous collections, show her expanding her range, yet even if they are used here to convey the words of another poet’s voices. There is also something in her writing here that carries her poetic voiceprint, though maybe readers who have not heard her reading in public might not pick this up. The writing is so good, it will carry a new reader along with the words.

This brings us to the presence of Ovid. I have read and enjoyed the “Metamorphoses,” a work that has had considerable presence in Western Literature. It is a monumental work, such that any other work, even by the same poet might be overshadowed by in comparison. Pollard mentions in her fascinating introduction that the “Heroides” enjoyed a popularity that may have eclipsed even that great work. If this came as a surprise, a greater shock was the possibility that the “Heroides” came to be seen as an inferior work by scholars.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm afraid that the current trend for 'translation' by poets ignorant of the language from which they 'translate' has led to an unhappy result here. The fiasco produced by the judges' unfortunate awarding of the Stephen Spender prize last year to a work of plagiarism underlines the potentially disastrous consequences of the English "no need to know, read or understand the original" approach to poetry translation. My Latin is little better than O-Level, but enough to tell me that Ovid's old men do not 'babble' (where did that ageist crime come from?). The unevenness of register - the mixing of high style and formal vocabulary one moment with recent near-slang expressions like 'holler', (a US import not used yet much in British English), 'bag-lady', 'slag', 'asking for it', did not help the translation or the poetry. The question "what kind of job has been made of the translation as a translation?" is of equal first importance both to the original and the result. To produce a 'free verse' (what was it Eliot said about that?), very free version drawn from study of other translations simply doubly ensured that it was not just the poetry that was "lost in translation". Any would-be translator should first read Grant Showerman's superb (and entertaining) century-old essay in "The Unpopular Review" on the art (and immense difficulty) of translating poetry, even if he was at times unable to follow his own advice in producing his prose translation of the Heroides for Loeb (who stipulated prose). And then proceed with caution and humility. I admire Clare Pollard's poetry and her achievements. This is not her best work.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Some excellent dramatic monologues from the women of the classical world, whose voices we so rarely hear.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a joy to read as both poetry and translation and the books production values are high. Currently fighting my daughter for possession of it.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback