Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £2.99
includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
Read this title for free. Learn more
Read for £0.00
with Kindle Unlimited
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Outcasts (Crusades Book 1) by [Lake, Martin]
Kindle App Ad

Outcasts (Crusades Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£2.99

Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy unlimited access to over 1 million titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month, including this one. Learn more

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3754 KB
  • Print Length: 285 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AKDJWOM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,342 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
This is very much a dialogue driven plot in keeping with good script writing, which in turn renders it a fast-paced read. As with all mediaeval stories of Crusaders venturing to the Holy Land, "Outcasts" ranks well alongside all the novels and movies on the theme of Saladin versus Whomever and made it to movie status or started out at movies. Off-the-cuff "El Cid" leaps to mind, followed by "Arne Knight Templar" and "Kingdom of Heaven". Interestingly the author has set out to follow-on from "Kingdom of Heaven" post surrender of Jerusalem to Saladin. It's quite remarkable that any of the knights were allowed to leave, but that's a story in itself and well-handled within this novel. Defining the difference between the Templar Knights and the Knights of St John is never that easy to explain, except to say the latter were hospitaler knights and those of the Grand Order of Knights had to be of aristocratic bloodlines.

This story is about the ordinary folks, men, women and children who find themselves caught up in the mediaeval madness of Islam Versus Christianity. Whether as a would-be knight or merely a pilgrim to the holy sites of Jerusalem, the aftermath of the city under siege and the battles to save or destroy it has taken great toll on the people. Herded away like cattle slavery awaits for those who survive the long treks ahead. The journeys in themselves prove treacherous for differing reasons. Men are separated from their loved ones and women left vulnerable to the overseers, hence hearts and souls are torn asunder as each battle to survive in their own way.
Read more ›
2 Comments 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoy Martin's works, they are easy to read yet full of the detail needed to make the scenarios and regions come to life, it is easy to imagine that you are there. Outcasts, puts a slightly different slant on the era of the Crusades, and the reader has the opportunity to see the conflict from both sides. As usual I am left, impatiently waiting for the next episode, the true sign of a great storyteller.
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Loved this book as much as the King Edgar series. The storyline is so intense and gave me a real insight as to this period of history. Saladin has a fearsome reputation as a leader of the Saracens bit I was unaware of his unpopularity within the Muslim world as a whole. Also it seems that during this time and in this part of the world each different faction whether religious or regal, there was at least understanding and some tolerence as well as treachery and betrayal. I am normally an avid reader of Roman historical novels but this author has ignighted a spark in me to continue reading about the crusades and the conflict between muslim and christian worlds. This book in particular seems to suggest that in real terms they were not really as different as I had always suspected. When or are the sequelsavailble???
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another Martin Lake great read. A story of the crusades, but not of The Lionheart, or Henri of Champagne or any other well known crusader, but the men of Jerusalem knighted by Balien d'Ibelin. This book tells their stories, these unknown men who slipped behind the mists of time and forgotten. Although Balien is nothing like the Orlando Bloom version, he existed and knighted these men. Mr Lake has given them a voice in history. Of course we do not know what they thought or what they did, but at least we know they existed. Now we have to wait for book two. Let us hope it will not be too long.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If, like me, you enjoyed Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven then you will be aware of Balian leading the doomed defence of Jerusalem. In Martin Lake’s Outcasts we see Balian as not the young Orlando Bloom but as the historically accurate veteran crusader knight, respected by Muslim and Christian alike. I knew that I would enjoy this book; however, I ended up enjoying it in a totally different way than which I envisaged.
The author skilfully sculpts us an image of Jerusalem, as we see it through the eyes of the young pilgrims: a holy city full of hope and faith on one hand but an assault on the senses on the other. The author has done a good deal of research and we are lost in the heady sights, sounds and smells of this great city but soon this image is smashed and in ruins as the whole region is sent into chaos as war stokes the fires of fanaticism. The book is mainly dialogue driven, rather than describing sweeping dioramas of bloody battles between Crusaders and Saracens, but this enables us to get into the central characters’ heads, to fully empathise with them.
Reading Outcasts I was swept along in the story, eagerly turning the pages. It soon becomes clear that the title is very well chosen: the warriors knighted by Balian are despised by Christian aristocratic knights, their blood and sweat lost in the defence of Jerusalem counting for nothing. The characters we follow are cast adrift from family, from city, denied nationality and even their faith brought into question. They are stranded in a land between worlds, at the crossroads of trade routes and a meeting of peoples and religions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover