Buy used:
£15.00
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: 4DVD box set with exclusive disc of extras. Original UK Region 2 release as pictured.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Our Friends In The North (4 Disc Set) [DVD] [1996]

4.7 out of 5 stars 192 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
11 used from £13.69 1 collectible from £33.00

LOVEFiLM By Post


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Find all the best television shows from the other side of the pond in our US TV store and catch the latest shows in our 2014's Hottest TV page.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video


Product details

  • Actors: Daniel Craig, Steve Hillman, Judith Parker, Christopher Eccleston, Gina McKee
  • Directors: Simon Cellan Jones, Pedr James
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Bmg
  • DVD Release Date: 19 Aug. 2002
  • Run Time: 623 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (192 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000066NRN
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 77,462 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

DVD Special Features:

The entire BAFTA winning series
Comprehensive pop-up 'filmographies' for cast members
Complete soundtrack listing with chart history
Exclusive interviews especially for DVD with Gina McKee & Christopher Eccleston
Retrospective from the makers of the series including writer Peter Flannery and executive producer Michael Wearing
Photo Gallery
Precis and colour stills from an unscreened episode

From Amazon.co.uk

An epic saga stretching from 1964 to 1995, Our Friends in the North follows the lives of four young people in North-East England. Nicky Hutchinson (Christopher Eccleston) is initially courting Mary Soulsby (Gina McKee) but the relationship cools when it takes second place to his campaigning for Harold Wilson's Labour Party. She weds Tory Tosker Cox instead, but their marriage is a miserable one, living in a rot-infested high rise block built following a dubious new housing scheme. Meanwhile, "Geordie" Peacock, finally tiring of his drunken, abusive father, headbutts him and hitches down to London, where he ends up working for a surrogate "family" led by Malcolm McDowell's flash Soho sex club baron.

Over the years, the paths of these characters intertwine, diverge then cross again, albeit occasionally stretching the bounds of plausible coincidence. The drama takes place against the backdrop of local authority and police corruption in the 60s, the radical far-left militancy of the early 70s, Thatcher's election, the 1984 miner's strike and the subsequent "murder" of Northern communities. What's brilliant about Our Friends is its melding of the personal and the political, with the soap opera of family estrangement played out against a backdrop of social decline. Peter Vaughn, playing Nicky's Dad as a former Jarrow marcher stricken by Alzheimer's, is especially poignant. If you didn't see this the first time, do so now.

On the DVD: Our Friends in the North has a bonus disc featuring a discussion with writer Peter Flannery and the producers and directors in which the making of the programme is revealed to have been as epic and protracted a saga as the drama itself. There are interviews also with stars Christopher Eccleston and Gina McKee. --David Stubbs

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Johnentwistlespout VINE VOICE on 8 Mar. 2007
Format: DVD
If you saw this went it originally came out, loved it and are wondering how much it has dated in the past decade before buying or renting the DVD - don't worry, its still brilliant! The series is made up of nine episodes (three set in the sixties, three in the seventies, two in the eighties and one in the nineties) and is essentially the story of four characters from Newcastle set to a backdrop of labour politics and rock'n'roll. If that sounds a bit boring it isn't, it's actually the one of the BBCs best and most memorable moments and packed full of A-list actors from today (although it has to be said no-one would have guessed Daniel Craig would ever have been Bond after seeing him as the lovely but tragic Geordie!). In the end "Our Friends" is about how people fade in and out of our lives, how we misunderstand those around us and the endemic sadness of lost ideals and distant friends. The series closes to Oasis "Don't Look Back in Anger" and was actually aired on the day that classic went to No.1 in the UK; at the time it seemed like a brilliant and moving moment in my life. Watching back all these years later it's still a special moment, but now I am that little bit older it's tinged with melancholy sadness. Worth watching every year.
3 Comments 106 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 20 July 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When it was first screened in 1996, Our Friends in the North reflected back the social decay of the sixties and seventies, at a time when a further big change, the rise of New Labour and Tony Blair's seemingly inevitable journey to Downing Street was providing the pivot for mid-nineties, pre-millennial self-examination. Tracing the lives of 4 friends from Newcastle, bonded by often clumsy and socially awkward situations, the epic piece of drama that unfolds remains one of the standout recent works in it's genre.
It's an overtly political piece, but in a way that demonstrates how political changes inform social change. Nicky (Christopher Eccleston) is consumed by involvement in the grubby and incestuos world of sixties north-east Labour politics, dominated by the exotic Austen Donohue. As Donohue's corruption unfolds, and the hopes formed by the election of a Labour government at the end of the first instalment fade away, Nicky turns to radicalism and protest, spending the seventies as a political and social photo-journalist, eventually marrying his childhood companion, Mary - herself bruised by a violent and turbulent first marriage to their mutual friend Tosker, which decays with the passage of the seventies. Geordie meanwhile is drawn into the Soho strip-clubs, run by Malcolm McDowell's grimy, fragile Benny Barrett.
Throughout, their lives are underpinned by their 'friends in the north' - fixers like Eddie Wells, whose life of solid political service to Labour masters is blown away in the storms of 1987, as the political tide reaches the high watermark of Thatcherism. Geordie's escape from the vice dens of Soho is complicated by ongoing investigations into vice and corruption in the Met.
Read more ›
3 Comments 143 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I watched this first time round on television and have always wanted to watch it again. I have now done so.

I don't intend repeating what others have said, it is enough to say that it is superbly written, acted, directed and filmed. There have been adverse comments about the fashions, the drabness, and the significant events portrayed. All I can is yes, precisely that's the way they were. Obviously there have to be compromises because this is drama, but that's why we have writers

Incidentally the only one star comment is from somebody who placed 18 reviews of products the same day, so probably responsible for his completely differing comments.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
As a Geordie who wasn't around in the 60's during T Dan Smith's vision of a 'Brasilia of the north' for Newcastle, it was interesting to see how the city was corrupted by greedy politicians. Alun Armstrong's tremendous performance as Austin Donohue compares well to video footage of Smith that I've watched, and you're left feeling that they completely believed in what they were doing, and the pay-offs were just a by-product of building a better city.
First time round, I thought this was complete fiction, but watching it 8 years later I know that, in places, it's too close to the truth for comfort.
Down side? Too many fake accents. But don't let that put you off!
Comment 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One of the best dramas to appear in the 1990s, whether on TV or film. A hugely ambitious project to chart the life and loves of a group of friends from Newcastle in the 60's - the 90's, it manages to achieve it's aim by concentrating on a few specific times rather than skipping quickly from one event to the next; it makes to want to start the next episode just to you can work out not just what happens immediately after the end of the previous one but in the next few years.

Good casting, combining actors who are familiar with some who have since become more well known, with not a weak link among them.

If you're looking at building up a DVD collection or just a fan of very high quality drama, get it!
Comment 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This is a truly epic TV drama of the highest quality. Spanning 30 years in the lives of 4 friends from Newcastle, it shows them moving from idealistic teenagers with plans to change to world through their bitter confrontations with the realities of life and their settling into middle age. With a story woven around largely true events - the political corruption in the North East that lead to the building of so much substandard housing, the corruption in the Met and their close links with the late sixties gangland, the miners strike and the dubious tactics of police and government in fighting it, etc, etc, it's a captivating tale.

The four friends (Christopher Eccleston, Gina McKee, Mark Strong and Daniel Craig) carry the drama well, and give believable faces to the events. It is, however, the supporting cast who really take the acting honours. Peter Vaughn (previously only known to me as genial Harry Grout in Porridge) is an absolute blowaway as Felix. A man who stood up for what he believed in by going on the Jarrow march, he is disillusioned by the lack of tangible change that resulted from his efforts. As his character gets older he slips into Alzheimer's, and Vaughn's portrayal of this terrible disease is intensely moving. His evolution of the character through the 9 episodes is a marvel to watch. David Bradley as Eddie Wells, local activist who becomes MP, is similarly memorable, as is Alun Armstrong in one of his best performances as Austen Donahuem. Donahue is an early spin doctor, an oiler of the machinery of local government. He has a conscience and truly believes in what he is doing, and the that bribes and money that change hands (and ends up in his own pockets) are a necessary and good thing as they bring about real improvements for the populance.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
See all discussions...

Look for similar items by category


Feedback