FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Other God: Dualist Re... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by PAGETURNERS
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Usual signs of a well read book but good overall condition. Probably not suitable as a present unless hard to find elsewhere DAILY POSTING FROM UK. 30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Other God: Dualist Religions from Antiquity to the Cathar Heresy (Yale Nota Bene) Paperback – 2 Oct 2000

4.5 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.99
£6.96 £5.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Other God: Dualist Religions from Antiquity to the Cathar Heresy (Yale Nota Bene)
  • +
  • The Lost Teachings of the Cathars: Their Beliefs and Practices
  • +
  • The Perfect Heresy: The Life and Death of the Cathars
Total price: £31.65
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 476 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (2 Oct. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300082533
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300082531
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 122,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A book of prime importance for anyone interested in the history of religious dualism. The author's knowledge of relevant original sources is remarkable; and he has distilled them into a convincing and very readable whole." -- Sir Steven Runciman

"A splendid account of the decline of the dualist tradition in the East . . . both strong and accessible. . . . The most readable account of Balkan heresy ever." -- Jeffrey B. Russell, Journal of Religion

"The most fascinating historical detective story since Steven Runciman's Sicilian Vespers." -- Colin Wilson

"Well-written, fact-filled and fascinating...has in it the making of a classic." -- Harry T. Norris, Bulletin of SOAS

'Superbly erudite, this is a demanding but fascinating account' -- Phil Baker, The Sunday Times, 7 October 2001

About the Author

Stoyanov is a distinguished researcher based at the Warburg Institute, London University.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In a superb and scholarly work Yuri Stoyanov charts the descent and evolution of Dualism (the idea of cosmic conflict between good and evil) from the revelations of Zoroaster and the Orphics, via the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Mithraic mysteries and the great Gnostic teachers, to it's revival in medieval Europe. It reveals a mass of political and religious undercurrents that lie beneath the surface of official history, touching on the Knights Templars, the Rosicrucians and the early Freemasons. This is by far the best book available in English on the movement that became known, in its last major European incarnation, as 'Catharism'.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The "Da Vinci Code" was largely fiction. In "Holy Blood, Holy Grail", it wasn't clear what was fact and what was fiction. But "The Other God" is just fact (and some interpretation) and yet as fascinating as the other two works.

Based on some other reading I'd done in this area, I had low expectations for this book. As I read it, the beginning didn't grab me. I didn't see where it was leading. But every new 50 pages seemed better than the preceding 50, not because the preceding 50 wasn't good, but because the latest 50 tied all the earlier pages together. It just kept getting better and better.

If you like reading about the Cathars, "The Other God" is even better. It shows the roots of Catharism, way back to Armenia and before. It tells the Cathar history. It discusses the Cathar beliefs. It's all very scholarly, with the main 294 pages backed up by 126 pages of footnotes and a select bibliography of 32 pages. Items that get alluded to in other books on the Cathars get discussed in depth here, such as the contribution of the Bogamils to Catharism. Not to mention the earlier contributions of Zoroaster, Mani, and Mithraism. Stoyanov is thoroughness incarnate.

If you've read the "Da Vinci Code" or "Holy Blood, Holy Grail", you'll recall the claim that Mary Magdalene had been Jesus's wife. You might have read discussions about that without hearing where it originated. Stoyanov points out that the Cathars introduced that belief (which isn't found in Bogamilism). No evidence it was based on fact (just as a lot in the Bible doesn't have factual support) but the belief did have a function: it at the least gave a higher status to women, something that many women who read the "Da Vinci Code" resonated with.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The history of secret societies and sects will not be the same after the publication of this book. The amount of new and frequently astonishing information concerning ancient and medieval underground societies is so great and so well-documented that one will need to read the book again and again to select the section of history he wants to explore and understand. The book fortifies with some dramatic new evidence the all-pervading importance of stellar myths and correlations in ancient Egypt, Babylonia and Iran, as emphasized in some recent books, and then traces these and related esoteric trends in late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Stoyanov's final discussion of Cathar secret doctrines and myths, including the teaching of a marriage between Jesus Christ and Mary Magdalene ('described as a 'great secret')and their sources is a tour de force and one has the feeling that he does not reveal all the material at his disposal, hinting that it is reserved for a book yet to come for which I will wait with some impatience.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With everyone before me having scored this book with top marks, I wonder whether I have been reading the same work.

Whilst some apparently deep scholarship has gone into this book (fully one-third of the 467 or so pages in this book comprises the notes and bibliography) and yet it is written so as to be easily accessible to the general reader, it's ultimately deeply unsatisfying.

Why so? Well firstly, there are factual mistakes and misattributions. To take examples over a couple of pages: Diocletian abdicated in 305 so was not publishing edicts in 307; Julian became emperor in 360 not 361; the Persian rock relief alluded to in Taq-e Bostan is regarded by most scholars as in fact depicting the first Sassanid king Ardashir I and his son Shapur I along with their 'guardian angel' Izad Bahran standing over the body of the deposed last Parthian king Artabanes IV, rather than Shapur II and Mithra standing over Julian; the edict outlawing other religions in 380 was not a Theodosian edict, but a joint edict of Theodosius, Gratian and Valentinian II (admittedly the latter of these three was powerless and emperor in name only, but Gratian was just as religiously zealous as Theodosius in his Catholicism). Granted, these kind of errors are not directly relevant to the subject of the book, but it just makes one wonder about the accuracy of the scholarship in general when even basic facts are incorrect.
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback